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I have the following three class defined in a .h file:

class Base
{ // number of pure virtual functions };

class Derived1 : public Base
{ // number of pure virtual functions };

class Derived2 : public Base
{ // number of pure virtual functions };

I want users of this header file to only subclass Derived1 or Derived2. I want to prevent users from subclass'ing Base. I "could" have used the keyword "final" for class Base, but that would prevent me from subclassing in my header file. I need to have all the above classes in the header file as a user needs to provide definitions of methods in Base and DerivedX classes.

I am thinking of something like limiting the scope of inheritance to within a header file (similar to a static variable). Any suggestions or ideas would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
7  
You could make the Base constructor private and have those two classes friends – Marco A. Aug 22 '14 at 14:11
7  
I really dislike this kind of thinking. Base classes have no concept or notion of the derived classes that inherit from them, so why why why should they be able to ban the derived classes' existence?! – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 22 '14 at 14:49
    
+1 on Lightness, I would change something in the design if I were you. But it's probably off-topic for the question – Marco A. Aug 22 '14 at 14:58
3  
I get the sense that you are trying to use the wrong approach to solve something. How are Derevied1 and Derived2 benefitting by deriving from Base and what harm would arise if other classes derived from Base? – R Sahu Aug 22 '14 at 15:03
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Don't base classes already need to have a notion of allowing derived classes? e.g. providing virtual destructors, or if the base class derives from another class, possibly using virtual inheritance in case someone creates a diamond later... – jamesdlin Aug 22 '14 at 19:41

You could make the Base constructor private and have those two classes friends, e.g.

#include <iostream>

class Base
{
private:
    Base() {}
    friend class Derived1;
    friend class Derived2;
};

class Derived1 : public Base
{
};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
};

int main() {

    Derived1 obj;
    Base obj2; // Error

    return 0;
}

http://ideone.com/NUWad0

Also notice: copy/move constructor of base class should probably also be private. I'm not adding the code to focus on the main proposal but you should think about it too.


Edit with regard to friend constructors.

First off: you cannot reference the members of an incomplete type before its definition is seen by the compiler (it works as a one-time pass and there might be some overload resolution involved). This means the following won't work:

class Derived1;
class Derived2;

class Base
{
private:
    Base() {}
    friend Derived1::Derived1(); // Error - incomplete type 'Derived1' in nested name specifier
};

class Derived1 : public Base
{
    public:
    Derived1() {};
};

...    

and you cannot forward declare a base class (you wouldn't know how much space to allocate for a derived object):

class Base;

class Derived1 : public Base // Error: base class has incomplete type
{
    public:
    Derived1() {};
};

class Base
{
private:
    Base() {}
    friend Derived1::Derived1();
};

...

therefore in your specific case you'd better off with a friend class access unless you want to modify something in your design.

share|improve this answer
5  
This is how I'd do it too. Just a note though, I'd remove using namespace std since it's bad practice and doesn't do anything in this code anyway. – Rapptz Aug 22 '14 at 14:14
    
@Rapptz I agree, it was just a quick code snippet but it's good to avoid that. Thanks – Marco A. Aug 22 '14 at 14:15
3  
@omid that is correct, I just tried it out. I can define "class Derived3 : public Base { }; ". I would have liked it if the compiler would have / could have flagged this as an error. However, the compiler does generate an error if I try to instantiate Derived3. I guess this is good enough. – Ahmed A Aug 22 '14 at 14:23
1  
@omid But it does prevent creating an instance of any other derived class... – Angew Aug 22 '14 at 14:26
1  
Copy/move constructor of base class should also be private. – Jarod42 Aug 22 '14 at 15:01

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