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I know that PHP doesn't have native Enumerations. But I have become accustomed to them from the Java world. I would love to use enums as a way to give predefined values which IDEs' auto completion features could understand.

Constants do the trick, but there's the namespace collision problem and (or actually because) they're global. Arrays don't have the namespace problem, but they're too vague, they can be overwritten at runtime and IDEs rarely (never?) know how to autofill their keys.

Are there any solutions/workarounds you commonly use? Does anyone recall whether the PHP guys have had any thoughts or decisions around enums?

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1  
I created a work around function that enumerates constants as bitwise or not. Didn't notice you asked this before, but I have a better solution than class variables here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3836385/… –  Savagewood Apr 6 '13 at 21:41
    

24 Answers 24

up vote 745 down vote accepted

Depending upon use case, I would normally use something simple like the following:

abstract class DaysOfWeek
{
    const Sunday = 0;
    const Monday = 1;
    // etc.
}

$today = DaysOfWeek::Sunday;

However, other use cases may require more validation of constants and values. Based on the comments below about reflection, and a few other notes, here's an expanded example which may better serve a much wider range of cases:

abstract class BasicEnum {
    private static $constCacheArray = NULL;

    private static function getConstants() {
        if (self::$constCacheArray == NULL) {
            self::$constCacheArray = [];
        }
        $calledClass = get_called_class();
        if (!array_key_exists($calledClass, self::$constCacheArray)) {
            $reflect = new ReflectionClass($calledClass);
            self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass] = $reflect->getConstants();
        }
        return self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass];
    }

    public static function isValidName($name, $strict = false) {
        $constants = self::getConstants();

        if ($strict) {
            return array_key_exists($name, $constants);
        }

        $keys = array_map('strtolower', array_keys($constants));
        return in_array(strtolower($name), $keys);
    }

    public static function isValidValue($value) {
        $values = array_values(self::getConstants());
        return in_array($value, $values, $strict = true);
    }
}

By creating a simple enum class that extends BasicEnum, you now have the ability to use methods thusly for simple input validation:

abstract class DaysOfWeek extends BasicEnum {
    const Sunday = 0;
    const Monday = 1;
    const Tuesday = 2;
    const Wednesday = 3;
    const Thursday = 4;
    const Friday = 5;
    const Saturday = 6;
}

DaysOfWeek::isValidName('Humpday');                  // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('Monday');                   // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('monday');                   // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('monday', $strict = true);   // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidName(0);                          // false

DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(0);                         // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(5);                         // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(7);                         // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue('Friday');                  // false

As a side note, any time I use reflection at least once on a static/const class where the data won't change (such as in an enum), I cache the results of those reflection calls, since using fresh reflection objects each time will eventually have a noticeable performance impact (Stored in an assocciative array for multiple enums).

Now that most people have finally upgraded to at least 5.3, and SplEnum is available, that is certainly a viable option as well--as long as you don't mind the traditionally unintuitive notion of having actual enum instantiations throughout your codebase. In the above example, BasicEnum and DaysOfWeek cannot be instantiated at all, nor should they be.

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33  
I love this. The briefness is beautiful for its purpose. –  Zolomon Jan 2 '11 at 15:08
52  
I use this too. You might also consider making the class abstract and final, so it can't be instantiated or extended. –  ryeguy Mar 7 '11 at 18:17
17  
You can make a class both abstract and final? I know in Java this is not allowed. You can do that in php? –  corsiKa Apr 13 '11 at 21:46
14  
@ryeguy It seems you cannot make it both abstract and final. In that case, I'd go for abstract. –  NickC Jun 22 '11 at 16:15
32  
About abstract or final; I make them final and give them an empty private constructor –  Lex Mar 20 '12 at 11:46

There is a native extension, too. The SplEnum

SplEnum gives the ability to emulate and create enumeration objects natively in PHP.

http://www.php.net/manual/class.splenum.php

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2  
Here's an example with splenum: dreamincode.net/forums/topic/201638-enum-in-php –  Nordes Apr 6 '11 at 12:00
    
I rolled back, I like it better when I can see the link. It gives me context information. –  markus Jul 26 '11 at 21:58
    
@markus, ~native, as it requires installing custom extension –  takeshin Jul 29 '11 at 21:38
1  
SplEnum gives the ability to emulate and create enumeration objects natively in PHP. –  markus Jul 30 '11 at 1:40
1  
I rolled back again. I don't want you guys to edit out the link. –  markus Feb 27 at 20:58

What about class constants?

<?php

class YourClass
{
    const SOME_CONSTANT = 1;

    public function echoConstant()
    {
        echo self::SOME_CONSTANT;
    }
}

echo YourClass::SOME_CONSTANT;

$c = new YourClass;
$c->echoConstant();
share|improve this answer

I use interface instead of class:

interface DaysOfWeek
{
    const Sunday = 0;
    const Monday = 1;
    // etc.
}

var $today = DaysOfWeek::Sunday;
share|improve this answer
2  
To prevent instances? –  thomthom Dec 21 '12 at 20:19
2  
class Foo implements DaysOfWeek { } and then Foo::Sunday ... what? –  Dan Lugg Apr 4 '13 at 10:08
2  
Author of question asks for a solution for two things: namespace and auto-completion by IDEs. As the top-rated answer suggested, the easiest way is by using class (or interface, which is just a matter of preference). –  Andi T Sep 11 '13 at 15:02

Well, for a simple java like enum in php, I use:

class SomeTypeName {
 private static $enum = array(1 => "Read", 2 => "Write");

 public function toOrdinal($name) {
  return array_search($name, self::$enum);
 }

 public function toString($ordinal) {
  return self::$enum[$ordinal];
 }
}

And to call it: SomeTypeName::toOrdinal("Read"); SomeTypeName::toString(1);

But I'm a PHP beginner, struggling with the syntax so this might not be the best way. I experimented some with Class Constants, using Reflection to get the constant name from it's value, might be neater.

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Good answer, most of the other answers are using classes. You can't have nested classes though. –  Keyo Sep 26 '11 at 23:35
    
This has the benefit of being able to iterate through the values with foreach. And the detriment that an illegal value is not caught. –  BobStein-VisiBone Feb 16 '13 at 22:03
    
No auto completion in the IDE though, so would stimulate guess work. The constants would enable auto completion, sounds better. –  Greggg Jul 15 at 21:15

I used classes with constants:

class Enum {
    const NAME       = 'aaaa';
    const SOME_VALUE = 'bbbb';
}

print Enum::NAME;
share|improve this answer
1  
add const before NAME and SOME_VALUE –  wesamly Aug 31 '10 at 22:12
1  
We don't want user/developper to be able to change the value of the Enum. That is why you must put a const before –  Nordes Apr 6 '11 at 11:57

The top answer above is fantastic. However, if you extend it in two different ways, then whichever extension first results in a call to the functions will create the cache. This cache which will then be used by all subsequent calls, no matter whichever extension the calls are initiated by ...

To solve this, replace the variable and first function with:

    private static $constCacheArray = null;

    private static function getConstants() {
        if (self::$constCacheArray === null) self::$constCacheArray = array();

        $calledClass = get_called_class();
        if (!array_key_exists($calledClass, self::$constCacheArray)) {
            $reflect = new \ReflectionClass($calledClass);
            self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass] = $reflect->getConstants();
        }

        return self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass];
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Had this very issue. Brian or someone with edit privileges should touch on it in the accepted answer. I solved it in my code using the 'static::' method instead of 'self::' in the getConstants() function and re-declaring the $constCache in the child enums. –  Sp3igel Aug 18 at 23:47
    
Thanks a lot, Neil! Can't believe that it wasn't noticed all the years :/ –  coeing Aug 26 at 11:17
    
Added your answer to the top ranked one. –  raoulsson Sep 12 at 15:00

If you need to use enums that are globally unique (i.e. even when comparing elements between different Enums) and are easy to use, feel free to use the following code. I also added some methods that I find useful. You will find examples in the comments at the very top of the code.

<?php

/**
 * Class Enum
 * 
 * @author Christopher Fox <christopher.fox@gmx.de>
 *
 * @version 1.0
 *
 * This class provides the function of an enumeration.
 * The values of Enum elements are unique (even between different Enums)
 * as you would expect them to be.
 *
 * Constructing a new Enum:
 * ========================
 *
 * In the following example we construct an enum called "UserState"
 * with the elements "inactive", "active", "banned" and "deleted".
 * 
 * <code>
 * Enum::Create('UserState', 'inactive', 'active', 'banned', 'deleted');
 * </code>
 *
 * Using Enums:
 * ============
 *
 * The following example demonstrates how to compare two Enum elements
 *
 * <code>
 * var_dump(UserState::inactive == UserState::banned); // result: false
 * var_dump(UserState::active == UserState::active); // result: true
 * </code>
 *
 * Special Enum methods:
 * =====================
 *
 * Get the number of elements in an Enum:
 *
 * <code>
 * echo UserState::CountEntries(); // result: 4
 * </code>
 *
 * Get a list with all elements of the Enum:
 *
 * <code>
 * $allUserStates = UserState::GetEntries();
 * </code>
 *
 * Get a name of an element:
 *
 * <code>
 * echo UserState::GetName(UserState::deleted); // result: deleted
 * </code>
 *
 * Get an integer ID for an element (e.g. to store as a value in a database table):
 * This is simply the index of the element (beginning with 1).
 * Note that this ID is only unique for this Enum but now between different Enums.
 *
 * <code>
 * echo UserState::GetDatabaseID(UserState::active); // result: 2
 * </code>
 */
class Enum
{

    /**
     * @var Enum $instance The only instance of Enum (Singleton)
     */
    private static $instance;

    /**
     * @var array $enums    An array of all enums with Enum names as keys
     *          and arrays of element names as values
     */
    private $enums;

    /**
     * Constructs (the only) Enum instance
     */
    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->enums = array();
    }

    /**
     * Constructs a new enum
     *
     * @param string $name The class name for the enum
     * @param mixed $_ A list of strings to use as names for enum entries
     */
    public static function Create($name, $_)
    {
        // Create (the only) Enum instance if this hasn't happened yet
        if (self::$instance===null)
        {
            self::$instance = new Enum();
        }

        // Fetch the arguments of the function
        $args = func_get_args();
        // Exclude the "name" argument from the array of function arguments,
        // so only the enum element names remain in the array
        array_shift($args);
        self::$instance->add($name, $args);
    }

    /**
     * Creates an enumeration if this hasn't happened yet
     * 
     * @param string $name The class name for the enum
     * @param array $fields The names of the enum elements
     */
    private function add($name, $fields)
    {
        if (!array_key_exists($name, $this->enums))
        {
            $this->enums[$name] = array();

            // Generate the code of the class for this enumeration
            $classDeclaration =     "class " . $name . " {\n"
                        . "private static \$name = '" . $name . "';\n"
                        . $this->getClassConstants($name, $fields)
                        . $this->getFunctionGetEntries($name)
                        . $this->getFunctionCountEntries($name)
                        . $this->getFunctionGetDatabaseID()
                        . $this->getFunctionGetName()
                        . "}";

            // Create the class for this enumeration
            eval($classDeclaration);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Returns the code of the class constants
     * for an enumeration. These are the representations
     * of the elements.
     * 
     * @param string $name The class name for the enum
     * @param array $fields The names of the enum elements
     *
     * @return string The code of the class constants
     */
    private function getClassConstants($name, $fields)
    {
        $constants = '';

        foreach ($fields as $field)
        {
            // Create a unique ID for the Enum element
            // This ID is unique because class and variables
            // names can't contain a semicolon. Therefore we
            // can use the semicolon as a separator here.
            $uniqueID = $name . ";" . $field;
            $constants .=   "const " . $field . " = '". $uniqueID . "';\n";
            // Store the unique ID
            array_push($this->enums[$name], $uniqueID);
        }

        return $constants;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the code of the function "GetEntries()"
     * for an enumeration
     * 
     * @param string $name The class name for the enum
     *
     * @return string The code of the function "GetEntries()"
     */
    private function getFunctionGetEntries($name) 
    {
        $entryList = '';        

        // Put the unique element IDs in single quotes and
        // separate them with commas
        foreach ($this->enums[$name] as $key => $entry)
        {
            if ($key > 0) $entryList .= ',';
            $entryList .= "'" . $entry . "'";
        }

        return  "public static function GetEntries() { \n"
            . " return array(" . $entryList . ");\n"
            . "}\n";
    }

    /**
     * Returns the code of the function "CountEntries()"
     * for an enumeration
     * 
     * @param string $name The class name for the enum
     *
     * @return string The code of the function "CountEntries()"
     */
    private function getFunctionCountEntries($name) 
    {
        // This function will simply return a constant number (e.g. return 5;)
        return  "public static function CountEntries() { \n"
            . " return " . count($this->enums[$name]) . ";\n"
            . "}\n";
    }

    /**
     * Returns the code of the function "GetDatabaseID()"
     * for an enumeration
     * 
     * @return string The code of the function "GetDatabaseID()"
     */
    private function getFunctionGetDatabaseID()
    {
        // Check for the index of this element inside of the array
        // of elements and add +1
        return  "public static function GetDatabaseID(\$entry) { \n"
            . "\$key = array_search(\$entry, self::GetEntries());\n"
            . " return \$key + 1;\n"
            . "}\n";
    }

    /**
     * Returns the code of the function "GetName()"
     * for an enumeration
     *
     * @return string The code of the function "GetName()"
     */
    private function getFunctionGetName()
    {
        // Remove the class name from the unique ID 
        // and return this value (which is the element name)
        return  "public static function GetName(\$entry) { \n"
            . "return substr(\$entry, strlen(self::\$name) + 1 , strlen(\$entry));\n"
            . "}\n";
    }

}


?>
share|improve this answer
1  
I do like this, a lot. However, one of the primary complaints is the ability of the IDE to pick up the values for auto-complete. I'm not sure this would be able to do that without a custom addon for the IDE. Not that it couldn't be done, it just would take some work. –  corsiKa Apr 13 '11 at 21:49
    
Using eval() just so you can declare new Enums runtime? Eek. I'm not feeling it. How do you prevent other classes from creating an incorrect Enum class before you get to define the proper one? Aren't the Enums known before runtime? And as @corsiKa implied, no IDE autocompletion. Only benefit I see is lazy coding. –  Greggg Jul 15 at 21:10

I like enums from java too and for this reason I write my enums in this way, I think this is the most similiar behawior like in Java enums, of course, if some want to use more methods from java should write it here, or in abstract class but core idea is embedded in code below


class FruitsEnum {

    static $APPLE = null;
    static $ORANGE = null;

    private $value = null;

    public static $map;

    public function __construct($value) {
        $this->value = $value;
    }

    public static function init () {
        self::$APPLE  = new FruitsEnum("Apple");
        self::$ORANGE = new FruitsEnum("Orange");
        //static map to get object by name - example Enum::get("INIT") - returns Enum::$INIT object;
        self::$map = array (
            "Apple" => self::$APPLE,
            "Orange" => self::$ORANGE
        );
    }

    public static function get($element) {
        if($element == null)
            return null;
        return self::$map[$element];
    }

    public function getValue() {
        return $this->value;
    }

    public function equals(FruitsEnum $element) {
        return $element->getValue() == $this->getValue();
    }

    public function __toString () {
        return $this->value;
    }
}
FruitsEnum::init();

var_dump(FruitsEnum::$APPLE->equals(FruitsEnum::$APPLE)); //true
var_dump(FruitsEnum::$APPLE->equals(FruitsEnum::$ORANGE)); //false
var_dump(FruitsEnum::$APPLE instanceof FruitsEnum); //true
var_dump(FruitsEnum::get("Apple")->equals(FruitsEnum::$APPLE)); //true - enum from string
var_dump(FruitsEnum::get("Apple")->equals(FruitsEnum::get("Orange"))); //false

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1  
I'm doing pretty much the same thing, with two small additions though: I've hidden the static values behind static getters. One reason is, that I visually prefer FruitsEnum::Apple() over FruitsEnum::$Apple, but the more important reason is to prevent anyone else from setting $APPLE, thus breaking the enum for the entire application. The other is a simple private static flag $initialized that makes sure that calling init() becomes no-op after calling it for the first time (so no one can mess with that either). –  Martin Büttner Sep 26 '13 at 16:48

Here is a github library for handling type-safe enumerations in php:

This library handle classes generation, classes caching and it implements the Type Safe Enumeration design pattern, with several helper methods for dealing with enums, like retrieving an ordinal for enums sorting, or retrieving a binary value, for enums combinations.

The generated code use a plain old php template file, which is also configurable, so you can provide your own template.

It is full test covered with phpunit.

php-enums on github (feel free to fork)

Usage: (@see usage.php, or unit tests for more details)

<?php
//require the library
require_once __DIR__ . '/src/Enum.func.php';

//if you don't have a cache directory, create one
@mkdir(__DIR__ . '/cache');
EnumGenerator::setDefaultCachedClassesDir(__DIR__ . '/cache');

//Class definition is evaluated on the fly:
Enum('FruitsEnum', array('apple' , 'orange' , 'rasberry' , 'bannana'));

//Class definition is cached in the cache directory for later usage:
Enum('CachedFruitsEnum', array('apple' , 'orange' , 'rasberry' , 'bannana'), '\my\company\name\space', true);

echo 'FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::APPLE(): ';
var_dump(FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::APPLE()) . "\n";

echo 'FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::ORANGE(): ';
var_dump(FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::ORANGE()) . "\n";

echo 'FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof Enum: ';
var_dump(FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof Enum) . "\n";

echo 'FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof FruitsEnum: ';
var_dump(FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof FruitsEnum) . "\n";

echo "->getName()\n";
foreach (FruitsEnum::iterator() as $enum)
{
  echo "  " . $enum->getName() . "\n";
}

echo "->getValue()\n";
foreach (FruitsEnum::iterator() as $enum)
{
  echo "  " . $enum->getValue() . "\n";
}

echo "->getOrdinal()\n";
foreach (CachedFruitsEnum::iterator() as $enum)
{
  echo "  " . $enum->getOrdinal() . "\n";
}

echo "->getBinary()\n";
foreach (CachedFruitsEnum::iterator() as $enum)
{
  echo "  " . $enum->getBinary() . "\n";
}

Output:

FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::APPLE(): bool(true)
FruitsEnum::APPLE() == FruitsEnum::ORANGE(): bool(false)
FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof Enum: bool(true)
FruitsEnum::APPLE() instanceof FruitsEnum: bool(true)
->getName()
  APPLE
  ORANGE
  RASBERRY
  BANNANA
->getValue()
  apple
  orange
  rasberry
  bannana
->getValue() when values have been specified
  pig
  dog
  cat
  bird
->getOrdinal()
  1
  2
  3
  4
->getBinary()
  1
  2
  4
  8
share|improve this answer

I have taken to using the approach below as it gives me the ability to have type safety for function parameters, auto complete in NetBeans and good performance. The one thing I don't like too much is that you have to call [extended class name]::enumerate(); after defining the class.

abstract class Enum {

    private $_value;

    protected function __construct($value) {
        $this->_value = $value;
    }

    public function __toString() {
        return (string) $this->_value;
    }

    public static function enumerate() {
        $class = get_called_class();
        $ref = new ReflectionClass($class);
        $statics = $ref->getStaticProperties();
        foreach ($statics as $name => $value) {
            $ref->setStaticPropertyValue($name, new $class($value));
        }
    }
}

class DaysOfWeek extends Enum {
    public static $MONDAY = 0;
    public static $SUNDAY = 1;
    // etc.
}
DaysOfWeek::enumerate();

function isMonday(DaysOfWeek $d) {
    if ($d == DaysOfWeek::$MONDAY) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

$day = DaysOfWeek::$MONDAY;
echo (isMonday($day) ? "bummer it's monday" : "Yay! it's not monday");
share|improve this answer
    
Nothing is preventing you from redefining the enum values: DaysOfWeek::$MONDAY = 3; –  Greggg Jul 15 at 20:50

I've commented on some of the other answers here, so I figured I would weigh in too. At the end of the day, since PHP doesn't support typed enumerations, you can go one of two ways: hack out typed enumerations, or live with the fact that they're extremely difficult to hack out effectively.

I prefer to live with the fact, and instead use the const method that other answers here have used in some way or another:

abstract class Enum
{

    const NONE = null;

    final private function __construct()
    {
        ; // non-constructable
    }

    final private function __clone()
    {
        ; // non-cloneable
    }

    final public static function toArray()
    {
        return (new \ReflectionClass(get_called_class()))->getConstants();
    }

    final public static function isValid($value)
    {
        return in_array($value, static::toArray());
    }

}

An example enumeration:

final class ResponseStatusCode extends Enum
{

    const OK                         = 200;
    const CREATED                    = 201;
    const ACCEPTED                   = 202;
    // ...
    const SERVICE_UNAVAILABLE        = 503;
    const GATEWAY_TIME_OUT           = 504;
    const HTTP_VERSION_NOT_SUPPORTED = 505;

}

Using Enum as a base class from which all other enumerations extend allows for helper methods, such as toArray, isValid, and so on. To me, typed enumerations (and managing their instances) just end up too messy.


Hypothetical

If, there existed a __getStatic magic method (and preferably an __equals magic method too) much of this could be mitigated with a sort of multiton pattern.

(The following is hypothetical; it won't work, though perhaps one day it will)

final class TestEnum
{

    private static $_values = [
        'FOO' => 1,
        'BAR' => 2,
        'QUX' => 3,
    ];
    private static $_instances = [];

    public static function __getStatic($name)
    {
        if (isset(static::$_values[$name]))
        {
            if (empty(static::$_instances[$name]))
            {
                static::$_instances[$name] = new static($name);
            }
            return static::$_instances[$name];
        }
        throw new Exception(sprintf('Invalid enumeration value, "%s"', $name));
    }

    private $_value;

    public function __construct($name)
    {
        $this->_value = static::$_values[$name];
    }

    public function __equals($object)
    {
        if ($object instanceof static)
        {
            return $object->_value === $this->_value;
        }
        return $object === $this->_value;
    }

}

$foo = TestEnum::$FOO; // object(TestEnum)#1 (1) {
                       //   ["_value":"TestEnum":private]=>
                       //   int(1)
                       // }

$zap = TestEnum::$ZAP; // Uncaught exception 'Exception' with message
                       // 'Invalid enumeration member, "ZAP"'

$qux = TestEnum::$QUX;
TestEnum::$QUX == $qux; // true
'hello world!' == $qux; // false
share|improve this answer

I know this is an old thread, however none of the workarounds I've seen really looked like enums, since almost all workarounds requires you to manually assign values to the enum items, or it requires you to pass an array of enum keys to a function. So I created my own solution for this.

To create an enum class using my solution one can simply extend this Enum class below, create a bunch of static variables (no need to initialize them), and make a call to yourEnumClass::init() just below the definition of your enum class.

edit: This only works in php >= 5.3, but it can probably be modified to work in older versions as well

/**
 * A base class for enums. 
 * 
 * This class can be used as a base class for enums. 
 * It can be used to create regular enums (incremental indices), but it can also be used to create binary flag values.
 * To create an enum class you can simply extend this class, and make a call to <yourEnumClass>::init() before you use the enum.
 * Preferably this call is made directly after the class declaration. 
 * Example usages:
 * DaysOfTheWeek.class.php
 * abstract class DaysOfTheWeek extends Enum{
 *      static $MONDAY = 1;
 *      static $TUESDAY;
 *      static $WEDNESDAY;
 *      static $THURSDAY;
 *      static $FRIDAY;
 *      static $SATURDAY;
 *      static $SUNDAY;
 * }
 * DaysOfTheWeek::init();
 * 
 * example.php
 * require_once("DaysOfTheWeek.class.php");
 * $today = date('N');
 * if ($today == DaysOfTheWeek::$SUNDAY || $today == DaysOfTheWeek::$SATURDAY)
 *      echo "It's weekend!";
 * 
 * Flags.class.php
 * abstract class Flags extends Enum{
 *      static $FLAG_1;
 *      static $FLAG_2;
 *      static $FLAG_3;
 * }
 * Flags::init(Enum::$BINARY_FLAG);
 * 
 * example2.php
 * require_once("Flags.class.php");
 * $flags = Flags::$FLAG_1 | Flags::$FLAG_2;
 * if ($flags & Flags::$FLAG_1)
 *      echo "Flag_1 is set";
 * 
 * @author Tiddo Langerak
 */
abstract class Enum{

    static $BINARY_FLAG = 1;
    /**
     * This function must be called to initialize the enumeration!
     * 
     * @param bool $flags If the USE_BINARY flag is provided, the enum values will be binary flag values. Default: no flags set.
     */ 
    public static function init($flags = 0){
        //First, we want to get a list of all static properties of the enum class. We'll use the ReflectionClass for this.
        $enum = get_called_class();
        $ref = new ReflectionClass($enum);
        $items = $ref->getStaticProperties();
        //Now we can start assigning values to the items. 
        if ($flags & self::$BINARY_FLAG){
            //If we want binary flag values, our first value should be 1.
            $value = 1;
            //Now we can set the values for all items.
            foreach ($items as $key=>$item){
                if (!isset($item)){                 
                    //If no value is set manually, we should set it.
                    $enum::$$key = $value;
                    //And we need to calculate the new value
                    $value *= 2;
                } else {
                    //If there was already a value set, we will continue starting from that value, but only if that was a valid binary flag value.
                    //Otherwise, we will just skip this item.
                    if ($key != 0 && ($key & ($key - 1) == 0))
                        $value = 2 * $item;
                }
            }
        } else {
            //If we want to use regular indices, we'll start with index 0.
            $value = 0;
            //Now we can set the values for all items.
            foreach ($items as $key=>$item){
                if (!isset($item)){
                    //If no value is set manually, we should set it, and increment the value for the next item.
                    $enum::$$key = $value;
                    $value++;
                } else {
                    //If a value was already set, we'll continue from that value.
                    $value = $item+1;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
abstract class Enumeration
{
    public static function enum() 
    {
        $reflect = new ReflectionClass( get_called_class() );
        return $reflect->getConstants();
    }
}


class Test extends Enumeration
{
    const A = 'a';
    const B = 'b';    
}


foreach (Test::enum() as $key => $value) {
    echo "$key -> $value<br>";
}
share|improve this answer

I found this library on github and I think it provides a very decent alternative to the answers here.

PHP Enum implementation inspired from SplEnum

  • You can type-hint: function setAction(Action $action) {
  • You can enrich the enum with methods (e.g. format, parse, …)
  • You can extend the enum to add new values (make your enum final to prevent it)
  • You can get a list of all the possible values (see below)

Declaration

<?php
use MyCLabs\Enum\Enum;

/**
 * Action enum
 */
class Action extends Enum
{
    const VIEW = 'view';
    const EDIT = 'edit';
}

Usage

<?php
$action = new Action(Action::VIEW);

// or
$action = Action::VIEW();

type-hint enum values:

<?php
function setAction(Action $action) {
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

The most common solution that I have seen to enum's in PHP has been to create a generic enum class and then extend it. You might take a look at this.

UPDATE: Alternatively, I found this from phpclasses.org.

share|improve this answer
1  
Although the implementation is slick and would probably do the job, the downside of this is that IDEs probably don't know how to autofill the enums. I couldn't inspect the one from phpclasses.org, because it wanted me to register. –  Henrik Paul Oct 31 '08 at 19:31
3  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  La-comadreja Jun 13 at 15:15

The accepted answer is the way to go and is actually what I am doing for simplicity. Most advantages of enumeration are offered (readable, fast, etc.). One concept is missing, however: type safety. In most languages, enumerations are also used to restrict allowed values. Below is an example of how type safety can also be obtained by using private constructors, static instantiation methods and type checking:

class DaysOfWeek{
 const Sunday = 0;
 const Monday = 1;
 // etc.

 private $intVal;
 private function __construct($intVal){
   $this->intVal = $intVal;
 }

 //static instantiation methods
 public static function MONDAY(){
   return new self(self::Monday);
 }
 //etc.
}

//function using type checking
function printDayOfWeek(DaysOfWeek $d){ //compiler can now use type checking
  // to something with $d...
}

//calling the function is safe!
printDayOfWeek(DaysOfWeek::MONDAY());

We could even go further: using constants in the DaysOfWeek class might lead to misusage: e.g. one might mistakenly use it this way:

printDayOfWeek(DaysOfWeek::Monday); //triggers a compiler error.

which is wrong (calls integer constant). We can prevent this using private static variables instead of constants:

class DaysOfWeeks{

  private static $monday = 1;
  //etc.

  private $intVal;
  //private constructor
  private function __construct($intVal){
    $this->intVal = $intVal;
  }

  //public instantiation methods
  public static function MONDAY(){
    return new self(self::$monday);
  }
  //etc.


  //convert an instance to its integer value
  public function intVal(){
    return $this->intVal;
  }

}

Of course, it is not possible to access integer constants (this was actually the purpose). The intVal method allows to convert a DaysOfWeek object to its integer representation.

Note that we could even go further by implementing a caching mechanism in instantiation methods to save memory in the case enumerations are extensively used...

Hope this will help

share|improve this answer

This is my take on "dynamic" enum... so that i can call it with variables, ex. from a form.

look at updated verison below this codeblock...

$value = "concert";
$Enumvalue = EnumCategory::enum($value);
//$EnumValue = 1

class EnumCategory{
    const concert = 1;
    const festival = 2;
    const sport = 3;
    const nightlife = 4;
    const theatre = 5;
    const musical = 6;
    const cinema = 7;
    const charity = 8;
    const museum = 9;
    const other = 10;

    public function enum($string){
        return constant('EnumCategory::'.$string);
    }
}

UPDATE: Better way of doing it...

class EnumCategory {

    static $concert = 1;
    static $festival = 2;
    static $sport = 3;
    static $nightlife = 4;
    static $theatre = 5;
    static $musical = 6;
    static $cinema = 7;
    static $charity = 8;
    static $museum = 9;
    static $other = 10;

}

Call with

EnumCategory::${$category};
share|improve this answer
3  
The problem with this being; EnumCategory::$sport = 9;. Welcome to the sports museum. const is the better way of doing it. –  Dan Lugg Apr 4 '13 at 10:03
    
@Bracketworks, great & funny comment! I would give it much more votes if I could! –  nightcoder Jun 9 '13 at 15:37

Yesterday I wrote this class on my blog. I think it's maybe be easy for use in php scripts:

final class EnumException extends Exception{}

abstract class Enum
{
    /**
     * @var array ReflectionClass
     */
    protected static $reflectorInstances = array();
    /**
     * Массив конфигурированного объекта-константы enum
     * @var array
     */
    protected static $enumInstances = array();
    /**
     * Массив соответствий значение->ключ используется для проверки - 
     * если ли константа с таким значением
     * @var array
     */
    protected static $foundNameValueLink = array();

    protected $constName;
    protected $constValue;

    /**
     * Реализует паттерн "Одиночка"
     * Возвращает объект константы, но но как объект его использовать не стоит, 
     * т.к. для него реализован "волшебный метод" __toString()
     * Это должно использоваться только для типизачии его как параметра
     * @paradm Node
     */
    final public static function get($value)
    {
        // Это остается здесь для увеличения производительности (по замерам ~10%)
        $name = self::getName($value);
        if ($name === false)
            throw new EnumException("Неизвестая константа");
        $className = get_called_class();    
        if (!isset(self::$enumInstances[$className][$name]))
        {
            $value = constant($className.'::'.$name);
            self::$enumInstances[$className][$name] = new $className($name, $value);
        }

        return self::$enumInstances[$className][$name];
    }

    /**
     * Возвращает массив констант пар ключ-значение всего перечисления
     * @return array 
     */
    final public static function toArray()
    {
        $classConstantsArray = self::getReflectorInstance()->getConstants();
        foreach ($classConstantsArray as $k => $v)
            $classConstantsArray[$k] = (string)$v;
        return $classConstantsArray;
    }

    /**
     * Для последующего использования в toArray для получения массива констант ключ->значение 
     * @return ReflectionClass
     */
    final private static function getReflectorInstance()
    {
        $className = get_called_class();
        if (!isset(self::$reflectorInstances[$className]))
        {
            self::$reflectorInstances[$className] = new ReflectionClass($className);
        }
        return self::$reflectorInstances[$className];
    }

    /**
     * Получает имя константы по её значению
     * @param string $value
     */
    final public static function getName($value)
    {
        $className = (string)get_called_class();

        $value = (string)$value;
        if (!isset(self::$foundNameValueLink[$className][$value]))
        {
            $constantName = array_search($value, self::toArray(), true);
            self::$foundNameValueLink[$className][$value] = $constantName;
        }
        return self::$foundNameValueLink[$className][$value];
    }

    /**
     * Используется ли такое имя константы в перечислении
     * @param string $name
     */
    final public static function isExistName($name)
    {
        $constArray = self::toArray();
        return isset($constArray[$name]);
    }

    /**
     * Используется ли такое значение константы в перечислении
     * @param string $value
     */
    final public static function isExistValue($value)
    {
        return self::getName($value) === false ? false : true;
    }   


    final private function __clone(){}

    final private function __construct($name, $value)
    {
        $this->constName = $name;
        $this->constValue = $value;
    }

    final public function __toString()
    {
        return (string)$this->constValue;
    }
}

Usage:

class enumWorkType extends Enum
{
        const FULL = 0;
        const SHORT = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
And so? What's wrong? –  Arturgspb Feb 21 '11 at 9:32
2  
But it's good class and functions name's is native. And also translate.google.ru maybe help. –  Arturgspb Feb 22 '11 at 13:24
2  
Use chrome guys and translate it, if you're programmers, you read code! –  markus Mar 7 '11 at 18:12
7  
In general, it's always better to include the code within the answer, rather than linking to an external resource that may or may not be there in 'n' months/years, etc. –  middaparka Mar 7 '11 at 18:15
    
My class so big and I think that reading this post will be inconvenient. –  Arturgspb Mar 8 '11 at 7:49

Pointed out solution works well. Clean and smooth.

However, if you want strongly typed enumerations, you can use this:

class TestEnum extends Enum
{
    public static $TEST1;
    public static $TEST2;
}
TestEnum::init(); // Automatically initializes enum values

With an Enum class looking like:

class Enum
{
    public static function parse($enum)
    {
        $class = get_called_class();
        $vars = get_class_vars($class);
        if (array_key_exists($enum, $vars)) {
            return $vars[$enum];
        }
        return null;
    }

    public static function init()
    {
        $className = get_called_class();
        $consts = get_class_vars($className);
        foreach ($consts as $constant => $value) {
            if (is_null($className::$$constant)) {
                $constantValue = $constant;
                $constantValueName = $className . '::' . $constant . '_VALUE';
                if (defined($constantValueName)) {
                    $constantValue = constant($constantValueName);
                }
                $className::$$constant = new $className($constantValue);
            }
        }
    }

    public function __construct($value)
    {
        $this->value = $value;
    }
}

This way, enum values are strongly typed and

TestEnum::$TEST1 === TestEnum::parse('TEST1') // true statement

share|improve this answer

Some good solutions on here!

Here's my version.

  • It's strongly typed
  • It works with IDE auto-completion
  • Enums are defined by a code and a description, where the code can be an integer, a binary value, a short string, or basically anything else you want. The pattern could easily be extended to support orther properties.
  • It asupports value (==) and reference (===) comparisons and works in switch statements.

I think the main disadvantage is that enum members do have to be separately declared and instantiated, due to the descriptions and PHP's inability to construct objects at static member declaration time. I guess a way round this might be to use reflection with parsed doc comments instead.

The abstract enum looks like this:

<?php

abstract class AbstractEnum
{
    /** @var array cache of all enum instances by class name and integer value */
    private static $allEnumMembers = array();

    /** @var mixed */
    private $code;

    /** @var string */
    private $description;

    /**
     * Return an enum instance of the concrete type on which this static method is called, assuming an instance
     * exists for the passed in value.  Otherwise an exception is thrown.
     *
     * @param $code
     * @return AbstractEnum
     * @throws Exception
     */
    public static function getByCode($code)
    {
        $concreteMembers = &self::getConcreteMembers();

        if (array_key_exists($code, $concreteMembers)) {
            return $concreteMembers[$code];
        }

        throw new Exception("Value '$code' does not exist for enum '".get_called_class()."'");
    }

    public static function getAllMembers()
    {
        return self::getConcreteMembers();
    }

    /**
     * Create, cache and return an instance of the concrete enum type for the supplied primitive value.
     *
     * @param mixed $code code to uniquely identify this enum
     * @param string $description
     * @throws Exception
     * @return AbstractEnum
     */
    protected static function enum($code, $description)
    {
        $concreteMembers = &self::getConcreteMembers();

        if (array_key_exists($code, $concreteMembers)) {
            throw new Exception("Value '$code' has already been added to enum '".get_called_class()."'");
        }

        $concreteMembers[$code] = $concreteEnumInstance = new static($code, $description);

        return $concreteEnumInstance;
    }

    /**
     * @return AbstractEnum[]
     */
    private static function &getConcreteMembers() {
        $thisClassName = get_called_class();

        if (!array_key_exists($thisClassName, self::$allEnumMembers)) {
            $concreteMembers = array();
            self::$allEnumMembers[$thisClassName] = $concreteMembers;
        }

        return self::$allEnumMembers[$thisClassName];
    }

    private function __construct($code, $description)
    {
        $this->code = $code;
        $this->description = $description;
    }

    public function getCode()
    {
        return $this->code;
    }

    public function getDescription()
    {
        return $this->description;
    }
}

Here's an example concrete enum:

<?php

require('AbstractEnum.php');

class EMyEnum extends AbstractEnum
{
    /** @var EMyEnum */
    public static $MY_FIRST_VALUE;
    /** @var EMyEnum */
    public static $MY_SECOND_VALUE;
    /** @var EMyEnum */
    public static $MY_THIRD_VALUE;

    public static function _init()
    {
        self::$MY_FIRST_VALUE = self::enum(1, 'My first value');
        self::$MY_SECOND_VALUE = self::enum(2, 'My second value');
        self::$MY_THIRD_VALUE = self::enum(3, 'My third value');
    }
}

EMyEnum::_init();

Which can be used like this:

<?php

require('EMyEnum.php');

echo EMyEnum::$MY_FIRST_VALUE->getCode().' : '.EMyEnum::$MY_FIRST_VALUE->getDescription().PHP_EOL.PHP_EOL;

var_dump(EMyEnum::getAllMembers());

echo PHP_EOL.EMyEnum::getByCode(2)->getDescription().PHP_EOL;

And produces this output:

1 : My first value

array(3) {
[1]=>
object(EMyEnum)#1 (2) {
["code":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
int(1)
["description":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
string(14) "My first value"
}
[2]=>
object(EMyEnum)#2 (2) {
["code":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
int(2)
["description":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
string(15) "My second value"
}
[3]=>
object(EMyEnum)#3 (2) {
["code":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
int(3)
["description":"AbstractEnum":private]=>
string(14) "My third value"
}
}

My second value

share|improve this answer

Four years later I came across this again. My current approach is this as it allows for code completion in the IDE as well as type safety:

Base class:

abstract class TypedEnum
{
    private static $_instancedValues;

    private $_value;
    private $_name;

    private function __construct($value, $name)
    {
        $this->_value = $value;
        $this->_name = $name;
    }

    private static function _fromGetter($getter, $value)
    {
        $reflectionClass = new ReflectionClass(get_called_class());
        $methods = $reflectionClass->getMethods(ReflectionMethod::IS_STATIC | ReflectionMethod::IS_PUBLIC);    
        $className = get_called_class();

        foreach($methods as $method)
        {
            if ($method->class === $className)
            {
                $enumItem = $method->invoke(null);

                if ($enumItem instanceof $className && $enumItem->$getter() === $value)
                {
                    return $enumItem;
                }
            }
        }

        throw new OutOfRangeException();
    }

    protected static function _create($value)
    {
        if (self::$_instancedValues === null)
        {
            self::$_instancedValues = array();
        }

        $className = get_called_class();

        if (!isset(self::$_instancedValues[$className]))
        {
            self::$_instancedValues[$className] = array();
        }

        if (!isset(self::$_instancedValues[$className][$value]))
        {
            $debugTrace = debug_backtrace();
            $lastCaller = array_shift($debugTrace);

            while ($lastCaller['class'] !== $className && count($debugTrace) > 0)
            {
                $lastCaller = array_shift($debugTrace);
            }

            self::$_instancedValues[$className][$value] = new static($value, $lastCaller['function']);
        }

        return self::$_instancedValues[$className][$value];
    }

    public static function fromValue($value)
    {
        return self::_fromGetter('getValue', $value);
    }

    public static function fromName($value)
    {
        return self::_fromGetter('getName', $value);
    }

    public function getValue()
    {
        return $this->_value;
    }

    public function getName()
    {
        return $this->_name;
    }
}

Example Enum:

final class DaysOfWeek extends TypedEnum
{
    public static function Sunday() { return self::_create(0); }    
    public static function Monday() { return self::_create(1); }
    public static function Tuesday() { return self::_create(2); }   
    public static function Wednesday() { return self::_create(3); }
    public static function Thursday() { return self::_create(4); }  
    public static function Friday() { return self::_create(5); }
    public static function Saturday() { return self::_create(6); }      
}

Example usage:

function saveEvent(DaysOfWeek $weekDay, $comment)
{
    // store week day numeric value and comment:
    $myDatabase->save('myeventtable', 
       array('weekday_id' => $weekDay->getValue()),
       array('comment' => $comment));
}

// call the function, note: DaysOfWeek::Monday() returns an object of type DaysOfWeek
saveEvent(DaysOfWeek::Monday(), 'some comment');

Note that all instances of the same enum entry are the same:

$monday1 = DaysOfWeek::Monday();
$monday2 = DaysOfWeek::Monday();
$monday1 === $monday2; // true

You can also use it inside of a switch statement:

function getGermanWeekDayName(DaysOfWeek $weekDay)
{
    switch ($weekDay)
    {
        case DaysOfWeek::Monday(): return 'Montag';
        case DaysOfWeek::Tuesday(): return 'Dienstag';
        // ...
}

You can also create an enum entry by name or value:

$monday = DaysOfWeek::fromValue(2);
$tuesday = DaysOfWeek::fromName('Tuesday');

Or you can just get the name (i.e. the function name) from an existing enum entry:

$wednesday = DaysOfWeek::Wednesday()
echo $wednesDay->getName(); // Wednesday
share|improve this answer

I use a construction like the following for simple enums. Typically you can use them for switch statements.

<?php 
  define("OPTION_1", "1");
  define("OPTION_2", OPTION_1 + 1);
  define("OPTION_3", OPTION_2 + 1);

  // Some function...
   switch($Val){
    case OPTION_1:{ Perform_1();}break;
    case OPTION_2:{ Perform_2();}break;
    ...
  }
?>

It is not as conviniet as a native enum like in C++ but it seems to work and requires less maintenance if you later would like to add an option in between.

share|improve this answer
2  
You are missing the point entirely. Java Enumerations are part of their OOP. The question was whether there is an alternativ in PHP besides constants, and your solution does neither use OOP, nor avoid constants. –  Sven Oct 19 '12 at 22:19

My attempt to create an enum with PHP...it's extremely limited since it doesn't support objects as the enum values but still somewhat useful...

class ProtocolsEnum {

    const HTTP = '1';
    const HTTPS = '2';
    const FTP = '3';

    /**
     * Retrieve an enum value
     * @param string $name
     * @return string
     */
    public static function getValueByName($name) {
        return constant('self::'. $name);
    } 

    /**
     * Retrieve an enum key name
     * @param string $code
     * @return string
     */
    public static function getNameByValue($code) {
        foreach(get_class_constants() as $key => $val) {
            if($val == $code) {
                return $key;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Retrieve associate array of all constants (used for creating droplist options)
     * @return multitype:
     */
    public static function toArray() {      
        return array_flip(self::get_class_constants());
    }

    private static function get_class_constants()
    {
        $reflect = new ReflectionClass(__CLASS__);
        return $reflect->getConstants();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it's limited in many directions and the existing answers offer far more over it. I'd say this is not really adding anything useful. –  hakre Oct 4 '12 at 13:34

protected by obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Aug 23 '13 at 4:12

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