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If I have a method for calculating the greatest common divisor of two integers as:

public static int GCD(int a, int b)
{
    return b == 0 ? a : GCD(b, a % b);
}

What would be the best way to attach that to the System.Math class?

Here are the three ways I have come up with:

public static int GCD(this int a, int b)
{
    return b == 0 ? a : b.GCD(a % b);
}

// Lame...

var gcd = a.GCD(b);

and:

public static class RationalMath
{
    public static int GCD(int a, int b)
    {
        return b == 0 ? a : GCD(b, a % b);
    }
}

// Lame...

var gcd = RationalMath.GCD(a, b);

and:

public static int GCD(this Type math, int a, int b)
{
    return b == 0 ? a : typeof(Math).GCD(b, a % b);
}

// Neat?

var gcd = typeof(Math).GCD(a, b);

The desired syntax is Math.GCD since that is the standard for all mathematical functions.

Any suggestions? What should I do to get the desired syntax?

share|improve this question
    
Your code would also work with var gcd = typeof(string).GCD(a, b) - it just needs an instance of Type... I don't think what you want to do is actually possible. – Dean Harding Mar 30 '10 at 12:51
    
Clearly, yeah. But I want people to understand that the GCD function is just-another-math-function. – John Gietzen Mar 30 '10 at 12:52
2  
the best you can do imho is define GCD in a MoreMath class, or similar – jk. Mar 30 '10 at 13:04
1  
@Adam is right. This is impossible. You can not add a static method to the Math class without having the source code of Math and rebuilding the assembly that contains it. – Erv Walter Mar 30 '10 at 13:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would prefer the one with RationalMath. You really don't need extension methods here, because their aim is to mimic instance methods of objects of you can't modify. But here one should use plain old static method.

share|improve this answer
    
I would name it like <companyName>Math. If really want, you can write wrappers for all the Math functions and then tell all developers to use only <companyName>Math ... but thats probably overkill. – TheSean Mar 30 '10 at 13:06
1  
@TheSean: I just posted that as an answer as well . . . although I agree that it probably isn't worth it. – Tim Goodman Mar 30 '10 at 13:14

You cannot. Extension methods are just syntactic sugar for calling a static function and passing an instance of a particular type. Given that, they operate only on instances, as they must be defined by passing a this parameter of the type you want to attach to.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Nick: You can call any extension method directly. What's your point? – Adam Robinson Mar 30 '10 at 12:52
1  
So, how do i get my desired syntax? That is the question at hand, not necessarily using extension methods directly... Right now, this answer is not helpful. I already fully realize that the extension methods cannot apply to classes themselves... – John Gietzen Mar 30 '10 at 12:54
2  
@John: Again, what you're asking for is impossible with any version of C# (or any other .NET language). There is not an answer to your question other than "you can't." – Adam Robinson Mar 30 '10 at 12:54
2  
@John: We're going in circles. Your desired syntax is System.Math.GCD. I said this is impossible. You said you know that. I asked why you asked the question. You said to get the syntax that you know is impossible. ??? = profit. – Adam Robinson Mar 30 '10 at 12:59
4  
@John, you're being a tad difficult! You cannot extend System.Math. You already know your options: extension method on int, or a static (whatever)Math class of your own. And, as Adam pointed out, if you opt for My.Math, then you'll have to fully qualify System.Math whenever you need it. Personally, I would go for a static math utility class named something like MathUtility. – Anthony Pegram Mar 30 '10 at 13:20

Given the fact that you cannot extend the static Math class I would go for sample #2. It follows the pattern used by Math, does not clutter the int method space, and is simple and clean to invoke. #3 is plain horrible :)

share|improve this answer
    
I know it is. That's why I'm here. :) – John Gietzen Mar 30 '10 at 12:57

Personally, I wouldn't do it the way you want. System.Math is just one static class that contains some mathematical functions . . . there's no reason it has to contain every mathematical function you'd ever want to use.

However, if you really want this, I suppose you could write your own static Math class that's a sort of wrapper for System.Math . . . basically just implement every function in System.Math by passing it along to the actual System.Math class. Like this:

public static class Math
{

  public static int GCD(int a, int b)
  {
     return b == 0 ? a : GCD(b, a % b);
  }

  // Implement the System.Math methods
  public static double Pow(double x, double y)
  {
    return System.Math.Pow(x, y);
  }
  // etc.
}

This seems like a real pain in the neck though for not much benefit. (Kind of an anti-syntactic sugar.) But it would let you call Math.GCD(a,b) and, say, Math.Pow(x,y) from the same class, which is what it sounds like you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Yay for real suggestions! I agree that this is overkill, tho. – John Gietzen Mar 30 '10 at 13:15

Ok, one other way I thought of:

namespace My
{
    public static class Math
    {
    }
}


namespace MainApp
{
    ...
    var gcd = My.Math.GCD(a, b);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

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