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How can I get the difference between two timestamps in days? Should I be using a datetime column for this?


I switched my column to datetime. Simple subtraction doesn't seem to give me a result in days.

mysql> SELECT NOW(), last_confirmation_attempt, NOW() - last_confirmation_attempt AS diff  FROM DateClubs HAVING diff IS NOT NULL ;
+---------------------+---------------------------+-----------------+
| NOW()               | last_confirmation_attempt | diff            |
+---------------------+---------------------------+-----------------+
| 2010-03-30 10:52:31 | 2010-03-16 10:41:47       | 14001084.000000 |
+---------------------+---------------------------+-----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

I don't think diff is in seconds, because when I divide diff by number of seconds in a day ( 86,400 ), I don't get a sensical answer:

mysql> SELECT NOW(), last_confirmation_attempt, ( NOW() - last_confirmation_attempt) / 86400 AS diff  FROM DateClubs HAVING diff IS NOT NULL ;
+---------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
| NOW()               | last_confirmation_attempt | diff           |
+---------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
| 2010-03-30 10:58:58 | 2010-03-16 10:41:47       | 162.0568402778 |
+---------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
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What datatype are your columns/values at the moment? –  Andy Shellam Mar 30 '10 at 14:41
    
I was using timestamps, but I just changed one column to datetime. –  user151841 Mar 30 '10 at 14:48
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4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

If you're happy to ignore the time portion in the columns, DATEDIFF() will give you the difference you're looking for in days.

SELECT DATEDIFF('2010-10-08 18:23:13', '2010-09-21 21:40:36') AS days;
+------+
| days |
+------+
|   17 |
+------+
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CREATE TABLE t (d1 timestamp, d2 timestamp);

INSERT INTO t VALUES ('2010-03-11 12:00:00', '2010-03-30 05:00:00');
INSERT INTO t VALUES ('2010-03-11 12:00:00', '2010-03-30 13:00:00');
INSERT INTO t VALUES ('2010-03-11 00:00:00', '2010-03-30 13:00:00');
INSERT INTO t VALUES ('2010-03-10 12:00:00', '2010-03-30 13:00:00');
INSERT INTO t VALUES ('2010-03-10 12:00:00', '2010-04-01 13:00:00');

SELECT d2, d1, DATEDIFF(d2, d1) AS diff FROM t;

+---------------------+---------------------+------+
| d2                  | d1                  | diff |
+---------------------+---------------------+------+
| 2010-03-30 05:00:00 | 2010-03-11 12:00:00 |   19 |
| 2010-03-30 13:00:00 | 2010-03-11 12:00:00 |   19 |
| 2010-03-30 13:00:00 | 2010-03-11 00:00:00 |   19 |
| 2010-03-30 13:00:00 | 2010-03-10 12:00:00 |   20 |
| 2010-04-01 13:00:00 | 2010-03-10 12:00:00 |   22 |
+---------------------+---------------------+------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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I know is quite old, but I'll say just for the sake of it - I was looking for the same problem and got here, but I needed the difference in days.

I used SELECT (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(DATE1) - UNIX_TIMESTAMP(DATE2))/60/60/24 Unix_timestamp returns the difference in seconds, and then I just divide into minutes(seconds/60), hours(minutes/60), days(hours/24).

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Does this properly handle leap years? –  user151841 Mar 26 '12 at 21:14
1  
Yes, because the timestamp handles the leap years. The timestamp difference returns the difference between two dates in seconds. If you divide until day, you are fine (every single day every year has the same amount of seconds). –  Enrico May 11 '12 at 11:57
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SELECT DATEDIFF( now(), '2013-06-20' );

here datediff takes two arguments 'upto-date', 'from-date'

What i have done is, using now() function, i can get no. of days since 20-june-2013 till today.

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