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How does the negative bit work?

Why does the negative bit allow negative numbers to have an absolute value 1 greater than positive ones (two's compliment)?

Why isn't this bit read in as 2^x, where c is the number of bits?

I just don't understand, can someone help me?

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2 Answers 2

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Everything that is stored in computers is just a bunch of bits. It is the conventions established by humans that attributes meaning to those bits. For example, 01000001 may represent an A according to the ASCII standard.

As another example, 10100100 may be interpreted as ¤ (the generic currency sign) in ISO-8859-1 or as (the Euro sign) in ISO-8859-15.

Analogously, the first bit of a number may be interpreted as a negative-sign bit if those bits are supposed to store a signed number in two's complement form. We could choose to treat 10100100 as either an unsigned byte (one hundred sixty-four) or as a signed byte (negative ninety-two).

Specifically, interpreting 10100100 as an unsigned number is straightforward:

1 * 2^7 + 0 * 2^6 + 1 * 2^5 + 0 * 2^4 + 0 * 2^3 + 1 * 2^2 + 0 * 2^1 + 0 * 2^0

To interpret 10100100 as a signed number in two's complement form, note that by convention, the first bit indicates that the number is negative, so the following process kicks in:

  • Invert the bits, to 01011011.
  • 0 * 2^7 + 1 * 2^6 + 0 * 2^5 + 1 * 2^4 + 1 * 2^3 + 0 * 2^2 + 1 * 2^1 + 1 * 2^0 = 91
  • Negate and subtract one: -91 - 1 = -92.
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So if a variable is signed the first bit signifies negative or positive. If it is unsigned, it is just 2^x based on how many bits? –  user3897320 Aug 23 at 18:11
1  
Yes, that is the convention. –  200_success Aug 23 at 18:12
    
Thanks, this looks like a good answer. –  user3897320 Aug 23 at 18:20

From wikipedia :

With two complement, you do not have two representations of 0 :

Say, for example, you have a signed integer coded on 3 bits :

  • 000 => 0
  • 001 => 1
  • 010 => 2
  • 011 => 3
  • 100 => -4
  • 101 => -3
  • 110 => -2
  • 111 => -1

With one complement, 000 and 111 would both represent 0, and your bounds would be -3:3

  • 000 => 0
  • 001 => 1
  • 010 => 2
  • 011 => 3
  • 100 => -3
  • 101 => -2
  • 110 => -1
  • 111 => -0 (wich is actually 0)
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How to the last two work? How is 1000 = 8? Shouldn't it be 0100? Same with the 1111 = -1. That ones just completely confusing. –  user3897320 Aug 23 at 18:12
    
I will update this example with 3 bits so you understand better. When you reach your positive boundary, you start from your negative boundary. –  Logar Aug 23 at 18:23

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