Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running the following code, which should be basic basemap stuff:

from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#basic stuff from the examples
plt.close('all')
m = Basemap(projection='merc',llcrnrlat=-80,urcrnrlat=80,\
            llcrnrlon=-180,urcrnrlon=180,lat_ts=20,resolution='l')
m.drawcoastlines()
m.fillcontinents(color='white',lake_color='aqua')
# draw parallels and meridians.
m.drawparallels(np.arange(-90.,91.,30.))
m.drawmeridians(np.arange(-180.,181.,60.))
m.drawmapboundary(fill_color='aqua')

lon=[
 -44.897539694478894,
 -79.56264363246461,
 -108.31264586027467,
 -129.5832433799378,
 -149.11755440233293,
 173.04624586158417,
 57.26114485166647,
 26.06650557322952,
 6.8910540489469785,
 -15.059586144625898]

lat=[
 -23.30021206811055,
 -22.174848810053106,
 -6.169632450760373,
 18.199421172044598,
 45.95724594253466,
 72.89364342463014,
 69.39230460744983,
 41.88542137864501,
 14.50656439517308,
 -8.974170076274387]

m.plot(lon,lat,latlon=True,c='orange')
m.plot(lon[0:5],lat[0:5],latlon=True,c='green')
m.plot(lon[5:-1],lat[5:-1],latlon=True,c='blue')

plt.show()

As you can see, I am drawing a basic map, then plotting stuff on it by latitude and longitude. A whole set of points is drawn in orange, then subsets of those same points are drawn in green and blue. Hence I would expect the orange plot to coincide essentially with the blue and green ones. Instead, here is what I get:sample output

From what I understand, the correct plot is the blue and green one. The same things does not happen with different choices of points. It seems like plot() get confused when the line to plot wraps around the map border in some sense.

Am I doing something wrong, or is this a basemap bug?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is interesting. An example with further illustration of the problem:

from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

m = Basemap(projection='merc',llcrnrlat=-80,urcrnrlat=80,\
            llcrnrlon=-180,urcrnrlon=180,lat_ts=20,resolution='l')
m.drawparallels(np.arange(-90.,91.,30.))
m.drawmeridians(np.arange(-180.,181.,60.))

lon=[
 -44.897539694478894,
 -79.56264363246461,
 -108.31264586027467,
 -129.5832433799378,
 -149.11755440233293,
 173.04624586158417,
 57.26114485166647,
 26.06650557322952,
 6.8910540489469785,
 -15.059586144625898]

lat=[
 -23.30021206811055,
 -22.174848810053106,
 -6.169632450760373,
 18.199421172044598,
 45.95724594253466,
 72.89364342463014,
 69.39230460744983,
 41.88542137864501,
 14.50656439517308,
 -8.974170076274387]

m.plot(lon, lat, 'ro', markersize=14, mec='none', latlon=True)
m.plot(lon[:-1], lat[:-1], 'bo', markersize=10, mec='none', latlon=True)
m.plot(lon[1:], lat[1:], 'go', markersize=6, mec='none', latlon=True)

The data is the same, but just omitting a sample from some point will offset the points:

enter image description here

The red, green and blue graphs should coincide. It looks really odd but it seems as if the X and Y coordinates were offset with respect to each other in some of the series.

Even the red points do not seem to be where they should be. Either this is a bug or there is something odd in the documentation. (I have matplotlib 1.3.1 and basemap 1.0.6.)

However, the projection conversion itself seems to work flawlessly:

c = m(lon, lat)
cp = m(lon[:-1], lat[:-1])

plt.plot(c[0], c[1], 'kx')
plt.plot(cp[0], cp[1], 'o', mfc='none', mec='k')

This creates:

enter image description here

Now the points are in the correct place (rings and crosses), and the selection of points to draw does not change the position of the points.

It can be seen that the X coordinates (latitudes) are correct in all pictures, but for some reason the longitudes seem almost random. Strange. (Anyway, the workaround is above.)


Update: I think I found the bug. The plot method of Basemap first shifts the data so that it starts from the edge of the plot. For example:

In [27]: m.shiftdata(lon)
Out[27]: 
array([ 173.04624586,   57.26114485,   26.06650557,    6.89105405,
        -15.05958614,  -44.89753969,  -79.56264363, -108.31264586,
       -129.58324338, -149.1175544 ])

This is quite ok, as now lines will be contiguous. Unfortunately, the latitude data is not shifted, and the results are exactly what is shown above.

If you shift both latitudes and longitudes by:

lons, lats = m.shiftdata(lon, lat)

and use the shifted version to plot the data, everything is fine.

To my eye it seems that there is some hassle with the decorator _transform1d used around plot and scatter methods. Monkey-patching this (__init.py__, lines 3239 and 3277 in today's git) by changing the decorator into _transform should help, but it may break other functionality in plot and scatter.

I think the best solution is to sort the data before plotting by using shiftdata as above. (And of course to file a bug report.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the excellent analysis. I ended up doing the conversion manually, too. I'll file a bug report. –  Federico Poloni Aug 25 at 10:51
    
For reference, here is the bug report. –  Federico Poloni Aug 25 at 10:57
    
I have copied the section with the explanation to the issue, please leave a note over there if you have any other comments. –  tcaswell Aug 25 at 17:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.