Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
create table empl 
(
     empid number primary key,
     empname varchar(25),
     email varchar(25) not null unique,
     doj date not null,
     sal number not null check (sal > 0),
     deptid number FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES dept(deptid) 
);
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Andrew Medico, marc_s, ArtB, Maheswaran Ravisankar, Kate Gregory Aug 24 '14 at 14:15

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
there should be a little bit of context and an actual question. Like this the post means nothing. – Nicola Miotto Aug 24 '14 at 13:36
    
@NicolaMiotto . . . I actually found the question understandable. Too succinct, but quite understandable. The error message is in the title and the code is the question. A little text like: "I run this statement and get such-and-such error message. How can I fix it?" would make the question better. – Gordon Linoff Aug 24 '14 at 13:40

Remove the FOREIGN KEY:

create table empl (
    empid number primary key,
    empname varchar(25),
    email varchar(25) not null unique,
    doj date not null,
    sal number not null check (sal>0),
    deptid number REFERENCES dept(deptid)
);

SQL Fiddle is here.

When defining a column, the foreign key relationship is established by the keyword references. You use foreign key when you want to introduce it as a constraint after the columns are defined. So you could also write:

create table empl (
    empid number primary key,
    empname varchar(25),
    email varchar(25) not null unique,
    doj date not null,
    sal number not null check (sal>0),
    deptid number,
    foreign key (deptid) REFERENCES dept(deptid)
);

By the way, when using Oracle, one usually uses varchar2() instead of varchar().

share|improve this answer
    
What might be worth mentioning is that this depends on the database system. Microsoft SQL Server does allow FOREIGN KEY even for column constraints. – hvd Aug 24 '14 at 13:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.