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1) I am using scipy's hcluster module.

so the variable that I have control over is the threshold variable. How do I know my performance per threshold? i.e. In Kmeans, this performance will be the sum of all the points to their centroids. Of course, this has to be adjusted since more clusters = less distance generally.

Is there an observation that I can do with hcluster for this?

2) I am realize there are tons of metrics available for fclusterdata. I am clustering of text documents based on tf-idf of key terms. The deal is, some document are longer than others, and I think that cosine is a good way to "normalize" this length issue because the longer a document are, its "direction" in a n-dimensional field SHOULD stay the same if they content is consistent. Are there any other methods someone can suggest? How can I evaluate?

Thx

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1 Answer 1

One can calculate average distances |x - cluster centre| for x in cluster, just as for K-means. The following does this brute-force. (It must be a builtin in scipy.cluster or scipy.spatial.distance but I can't find it either.)

On your question 2, pass. Any links to good tutorials on hierarchical clustering would be welcome.

alt text

#!/usr/bin/env python
""" cluster cities: pdist linkage fcluster plot
    util: clusters() avdist()
"""

from __future__ import division
import sys
import numpy as np
import scipy.cluster.hierarchy as hier  # $scipy/cluster/hierarchy.py
import scipy.spatial.distance as dist
import pylab as pl
from citiesin import citiesin  # 1000 US cities

__date__ = "27may 2010 denis"

def clusterlists(T):
    """ T = hier.fcluster( Z, t ) e.g. [a b a b a c]
        -> [ [0 2 4] [1 3] [5] ] sorted by len
    """
    clists = [ [] for j in range( max(T) + 1 )]
    for j, c in enumerate(T):
        clists[c].append( j )
    clists.sort( key=len, reverse=True )
    return clists[:-1]  # clip the []

def avdist( X, to=None ):
    """ av dist X vecs to "to", None: mean(X) """
    if to is None:
        to = np.mean( X, axis=0 )
    return np.mean( dist.cdist( X, [to] ))

#...............................................................................
Ndata = 100
method = "average"
t = 0
crit = "maxclust"
    # 'maxclust': Finds a minimum threshold `r` so that the cophenetic distance
    # between any two original observations in the same flat cluster
    # is no more than `r` and no more than `t` flat clusters are formed.
    # but t affects cluster sizes only weakly ?
    # t 25: [10, 9, 8, 7, 6
    # t 20: [12, 11, 10, 9, 7
plot = 0
seed = 1

exec "\n".join( sys.argv[1:] )  # Ndata= t= ...
np.random.seed(seed)
np.set_printoptions( 2, threshold=100, edgeitems=10, suppress=True )  # .2f
me = __file__.split('/') [-1]

    # biggest US cities --
cities = np.array( citiesin( n=Ndata )[0] )  # N,2

if t == 0:  t = Ndata // 4

#...............................................................................
print "# %s  Ndata=%d  t=%d  method=%s  crit=%s " % (me, Ndata, t, method, crit)

Y = dist.pdist( cities )  # n*(n-1) / 2
Z = hier.linkage( Y, method )  # n-1
T = hier.fcluster( Z, t, criterion=crit )  # n

clusters = clusterlists(T)
print "cluster sizes:", map( len, clusters )
print "# average distance to centre in the biggest clusters:"
for c in clusters:
    if len(c) < len(clusters[0]) // 3:  break
    cit = cities[c].T
    print "%.2g %s" % (avdist(cit.T), cit)
    if plot:
        pl.plot( cit[0], cit[1] )

if plot:
    pl.title( "scipy.cluster.hierarchy of %d US cities, %s t=%d" % (
        Ndata, crit, t) )
    pl.grid(False)
    if plot >= 2:
        pl.savefig( "cities-%d-%d.png" % (Ndata, t), dpi=80 )
    pl.show()
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