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Basically we need to change the end of line characters for a group of files.

Is there a way to accomplish this with a batch file? Is there a freeware utility?

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Advice from someone who has been fighting this for decades: don't. Do not convert data files between different formats, fix your programs to accept either format. –  Dour High Arch Mar 30 '10 at 19:09
    
The problem is with third-party tools that don't. –  T.E.D. Mar 30 '10 at 19:17
    
@T.E.D. The only way to win is to not use such tools. –  Dour High Arch Mar 30 '10 at 19:28
    
Does Oracle accept both formats? –  Pato Moschcovich Mar 31 '10 at 18:09

4 Answers 4

dos2unix

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You'll probably want a regex with that like terminal$> dos2unix *.extension –  rlb.usa Mar 30 '10 at 18:59
1  
You mean a glob? –  Ken Mar 30 '10 at 19:02

It could be done with somewhat shorter command.

    find ./ -type f | xargs -I {} dos2unix {}
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You should be able to use tr in combination with xargs to do this.

On the Unix side at least, this should be the simplest way. However, I tried doing it that way once on a Windows box over a decade ago, but discovered that the Windows version of tr was translating my terminators right back to Windows format for me. :-( However, I think in the interveneing decade the tools have gotten smarter.

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Combine find with dos2unix/fromdos to convert a directory of files (excluding binary files).

Just add this to your .bashrc:

DOS2UNIX=$(which fromdos || which dos2unix) \
  || echo "*** Please install fromdos or dos2unix"
function finddos2unix {
# Usage: finddos2unix Directory
find $1 -type f -exec file {} \; | grep " text" | cut -d ':' -f1 | xargs $DOS2UNIX
}

First, DOS2UNIX finds whether you have the utility installed, and picks one to use

Find makes a list of all files, then file appends the ": ASCII text" after each text file.

Finally, grep picks the text files, Cut removes all text after ':', and xargs makes this one big command line for DOS2UNIX.

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