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I have a planning structure on two tables to store available slots by day, and sessions.

A slot is defined by a range of time in the day.

CREATE TABLE slot (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT
, `date` date
, `start` time
, `end` time
);

Sessions can't overlap themselves and must be wrapped in a slot.

CREATE TABLE session (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT
, `date` date
, `start` time
, `end` time
);

I need to generate a list of available blocks of time of a certain duration, in order to create sessions.

Example:

INSERT INTO slot
  (date, start, end)
VALUES
  ("2010-01-01", "10:00", "19:00")
, ("2010-01-02", "10:00", "15:00")
, ("2010-01-02", "16:00", "20:30")
;

INSERT INTO slot
  (date, start, end)
VALUES
  ("2010-01-01", "10:00", "19:00")
, ("2010-01-02", "10:00", "15:00")
, ("2010-01-02", "16:00", "20:30")
;

2010-01-01

   <##><####>                               <- Sessions
 ------------------------------------       <- Slots
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20

2010-01-02

         <##########>          <########>   <- Sessions
 --------------------    ------------------ <- Slots
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20

I need to know which spaces of 1 hour I can use:

+------------+-------+-------+
| date       | start | end   |
+------------+-------+-------+
| 2010-01-01 | 13:00 | 14:00 |
| 2010-01-01 | 14:00 | 15:00 |
| 2010-01-01 | 15:00 | 16:00 |
| 2010-01-01 | 16:00 | 17:00 |
| 2010-01-01 | 17:00 | 18:00 |
| 2010-01-01 | 18:00 | 19:00 |
| 2010-01-02 | 10:00 | 11:00 |
| 2010-01-02 | 11:00 | 12:00 |
| 2010-01-02 | 16:00 | 17:00 |
+------------+-------+-------+
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Are you sure your example is stated correctly? You never populate session. –  MaxGuernseyIII Mar 30 '10 at 19:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you're life is going to be a lot easier if you approach this algorithmically rather than using a query. That could be using a sproc and that could mean writing an algorithm in the middle tier.

My recommendation is to just do it in the middle tier. Make the database responsible for storing the slots and sessions and leave the computations to something better suited to the task.

Databases are for persisting knowledge, not hosting business logic.

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I was trying to use MySQL exclusively because it allows easier manipulations and maintenance after finding the blocks of time. In fact I already made a php algorithm for this purpose, but it was quite heavy. I think you are right, I'm going to try to redo one. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Mar 31 '10 at 7:40

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