Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following array.

dates = ["6/23/2014", "8/5/2014", "8/19/2014", "6/26/2014", "8/19/2014", "8/19/2014",
"7/8/2014", "6/3/2014", "7/30/2014", "7/3/2014", "6/3/2014", "6/26/2014"]

Our array stores 10 string objects. In order to sort them my way, I need to re-arrange each element.

"2014/8/5", "2014/8/19", "2014/8/19", etc.

This way, 1/1/2014 doesn't come before 12/13/1994 for example.

I tried the following

dates.sort_by {|date|date.split(/[\/]/).rotate(-1).join('/')}

I would like to sort this array by date, with the newest dates first.

Actual Output

8/5/2014
8/19/2014
8/19/2014
8/19/2014
7/8/2014
7/30/2014
7/3/2014
6/3/2014
6/3/2014
6/26/2014

Expected Output

8/19/2014
8/19/2014
8/19/2014
8/5/2014
7/30/2014
7/3/2014
6/26/2014
6/3/2014
6/3/2014

The solution involves utilizing the Ruby Array Class sort_by method. I would like to sort with the date format, where newer dates come before earlier dates.

My question is, how would I sort the array based on the date.

My apologies if this is a stupid question, but I've searched this site, and couldn't find any results.

Thank you in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know why your expected output contains only 9 out of 12 entries, and that you mention an array of size 10, but I believe your want to sort all 12. My preference would be to do it the way @BroiSatse has, but I will offer a way that does not use methods from the class Date. I include it because it has some interesting aspects for those new to Ruby.

dates = ["6/23/2014", "8/5/2014",  "8/19/2014", "6/26/2014",
         "8/19/2014", "8/19/2014", "7/8/2014",  "6/3/2014",
         "7/30/2014", "7/3/2014",  "6/3/2014",  "6/26/2014"]

dates.sort_by { |d| d.split(?/).rotate(-1).map { |e| -e.to_i } }
  #=> ["8/19/2014", "8/19/2014", "8/19/2014", "8/5/2014",
  #    "7/30/2014", "7/8/2014",  "7/3/2014",  "6/26/2014",
  #    "6/26/2014", "6/23/2014", "6/3/2014", "6/3/2014"]

Here's what's happening.

enum = dates.sort_by
  #=> #<Enumerator: ["6/23/2014", "8/5/2014",  "8/19/2014", "6/26/2014",
  #                  "8/19/2014", "8/19/2014", "7/8/2014",  "6/3/2014",
  #                  "7/30/2014", "7/3/2014",  "6/3/2014",  "6/26/2014"]:sort_by>

As you see, enum is an enumerator. The first value that it passes into its block is "6/23/2014", which it assigns to the block variable:

d = "6/23/2014"

a = d.split(?/)
  #=> ["6", "23", "2014"]
b = a.rotate(-1)
  #=> ["2014", "6", "23"]
c = b.map { |e| -e.to_i }
  #=> [-2014, -6, -23]

Similarly, the third element of enum is converted to:

"8/19/2014".split(?/).rotate(-1).map { |e| -e.to_i }
  #=> [-2014, -8, -19]

sort_by uses Array#<=> to compare pairs of elements. After reading that doc you'll understand why:

[-2014, -6, -23] <=> [-2014, -8, -19]
  #=> 1

meaning that "8/19/2014" should precede "6/23/2014" in the sort.

Incidentally, it was necessary to convert months and days from strings to integers because those strings did not contain leading zeros for single-digit values. If we had left them as strings, "8" > "15", which is not what we want. Since we are converting to integers anyway, it was easier to make them negative than to leave them positive and apply reverse to the sorted array.

share|improve this answer

Try:

dates.sort_by {|s| Date.strptime(s, '%m/%d/%Y')

If you want it starting from the newest date:

dates.sort_by {|s| Date.strptime(s, '%m/%d/%Y').reverse
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.