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Is anyone familiar with working with this library: https://github.com/eloquent/enumeration

I am having trouble converting the instance of the constant back to the constant value.

class TestEnum extends AbstractEnumeration
{
    const THING1 = 'test1';
    const THING2 = 'test2';
}

class DoStuff 
{
    public function action(TestEnum $test)
    {
        if($test === 'test1') {
            echo 'THIS WORKS';
        }
    }
}

$enumTest = TestEnum::THING1();
$doStuff = new DoStuff();
$doStuff->action($enumTest);

My goal is to have the method action print 'THIS WORKS'. Because $test is an instance of TestEnum, this would not evaluate to true.

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This works, although I'm not sure it's what you're after. –  scrowler Aug 26 '14 at 0:39
    
I know that without the parenthesis it works, but that's not quite what I am after. The goal is to keep the type hinting in action(). Thanks anyhow! @scrowler –  theamydance Aug 26 '14 at 0:41
    
Yeah - the parenthesis is telling PHP to look for a function though... –  scrowler Aug 26 '14 at 0:42
    
With the library, the parenthesis means that TestEnum::THING1() is an instance of TestEnum class. If you're using phpstorm it'll freak out. –  theamydance Aug 26 '14 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're close, but there are two problems:

  1. Case matters. Thing1 != THING1
  2. $test, when treated as a string, evaluates to its key THING1. You want its value $test->value()

Example:

class TestEnum extends AbstractEnumeration
{
    const THING1 = 'test1';
    const THING2 = 'test2';
}

class DoStuff
{
    public function action(TestEnum $test)
    {
        if($test->value() === 'test1') {
            echo 'THIS WORKS';
        }
    }
}

$enumTest = TestEnum::THING1();
$doStuff = new DoStuff();
$doStuff->action($enumTest);

Output:

THIS WORKS
share|improve this answer
    
The case thing was a typo. Thanks for catching that. So I understand that the ->value() part is my goal. Is that a built in php function? In my case, if I were to write out a separate function to determine the value, the code will get messy and excessive. @derp –  theamydance Aug 26 '14 at 12:29
    
jk. just found it in the documentation. Thanks! –  theamydance Aug 26 '14 at 12:35

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