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Hi I'm working on a project about Data structures. In the first , I wrote everything in main but it sounds like C . But as I learned, I tried to thinkk OOP and do as little as possible in my main() methods.

I've implemented some opertation in my class like add,delet,find.it's too easy to implement its .

class ARB
{
        private:
                struct BT
                {
                        int data;
                        BT *l;
                        BT *r;
                };
                struct BT *p;
       public
                ARB();
                ~ARB();
                void del(int n);
                void add(int n); 
};

    void ARB::del(int num)
{
//The code ,don't care about it 

  };  

main()
{
// 
    BTR T;
    T.add(3);
    T.add(5);

};

But I arrived to the big program How can I define a methode which have to use a binary tree and to get a stack

STACK ARB::MyFunct(BT* p)
{
// The code don't care about it 
}

How can I apply it in the main programme

main()
{
// 
    BT T;
    T.add(3);
    T.add(5);
    STACK S;
    BT* p
    S=T.MyFunct(p); // error C2664 cannot convert parametre 1

};

**mention :I implement STACK class

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There's a few issues here. For one thing, add() is a member function of ARB, not BT. And, BT is a private subclass of ARB, so it can't be accessed from main(). p is a private member of ARB (as it should be), but it should really be a direct variable, not a pointer, so it will be automatically created and destroyed with ARB. As is, p is never initialized and there's no way to do so from outside ARB.

I'm guessing here that ARB uses its internal BT p for internal storage, so the implementations of add() and del() both operate on p, and that MyFunct() is supposed to take that BT and generate a stack from it. If so, MyFunct() should take no parameters and simply reference p directly.

So main() would look something like:

ARB arb;
arb.add(3)
arb.add(5)
STACK s = arb.myFunct(); // which should maybe be makeStack() or such

This is all assuming I've correctly deduced your intentions here.

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Thank you for your answer Absolutly , yes I'd like to do something like that . I'm trying to implement what you said,Should I use This to convert Look to this function i41.tinypic.com/25qrzbs.png what should I modify ! –  T_Geek Mar 31 '10 at 2:11
    
Should I use "This" –  T_Geek Mar 31 '10 at 2:12
    
You don't need to use "this". Simply take out myfunction()'s p parameter, so that the declaration looks like LLC ARB::myfunction(). p is already a member variable, so you can simply use it in member functions without passing it in. –  ceo Mar 31 '10 at 17:36

I assume you are trying to traverse the tree and build a stack out of it? I don't understand why you're passing in p. From your example, it looks like you've simply created a pointer to a BT object and then you're trying to pass it in.

It seems like this would make more sense:

S=T.MyFunct();

Couldn't you use this to build your tree? I guess I'm not sure what it is you're trying to do.

Assuming that you're trying to implement a function for the BT object that converts the BT into a stack, then you don't really need to pass anything in (because MyFunct is a member function of BT). You already have access to the tree within your member function, so all you need to do is traverse the tree and build a stack.

Note: My C++ is pretty rusty.

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Absolutly , yes I'd like to do something like that . I'm trying to implement what you said,Should I use This to convert Look to this function i41.tinypic.com/25qrzbs.png what should I modify ! My C++ is pretty rusty;Idon't think that –  T_Geek Mar 31 '10 at 1:54

That looks like it could be the STACK classes 'copy assign operator' is not correctly defined, eg:

class STACK {
public:
    ...
    STACK& operator=(STACK& right); // copy assign
    ...
};

in this case, the copy constructor is requiring that it can modify right, but the STACK returned from ARB::MyFunct() is a temporary, and cannot be modified. Try changing the copy constructor to STACK(STACK const& right), so C++ knows you will not modify it. If you are using a compiler supporting R-value references (eg, Visual Studio 2010), then you can define a 'move constructor' as well as the copy constructor:

class STACK {
public:
    STACK& operator=(STACK const& right); // copy assign: note 'const'
    STACK& operator=(STACK&& right); // move assign: note no 'const', double '&'.
    ...
};

This will only be called with temporary values, which it is allowed to modify.

The same rules apply to constructors:

class STACK {
public:
    STACK();
    STACK(STACK const& right); // copy construct
    STACK(STACK&& right); // move construct
    STACK& operator=(STACK const& right); // copy assign
    STACK& operator=(STACK&& right); // move assign
    ...
};

int main() {
    STACK S = T.MyFunct(p); // move construct S (right side is temporary)
    S = T.MyFunct(p); // move assign S (right side is temporary)

    STACK K = S; // copy construct K (right side is not temporary)
    K = S; // copy assign K (right side is not temporary)
}
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First off, it might help if line 5 and 6 are changed.

/* CODE : inside main
1 BT T;
2 T.add(3);
3 T.add(5);
4 STACK S;
5 BT* p
6 S=T.MyFunct(p); // error C2664 cannot convert parametre 1
*/

Line 5:      BT *p; -> BT *p = &T;
Line 6:      S=T.MyFunct(p) -> S=ARB::MyFunct(p);
Now assuming that MyFunct does what its suppose to do, it should work. The main problem with the program was that the pointer p wasn't initialized in effect reducing the parameter to void. Also, I'm assuming that MyFunct has no object relation, so it doesn't make a lot of sense to reference T in this case. That is why I would suggest instead the later version.

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why do you assume ARB::MyFunct() is static? Also, while he should be initializing p, it would not cause a compile error. –  Simon Buchan Mar 31 '10 at 1:48

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