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I have created data sources from my objects in my project, some of which have other objects as members. When I want to bind a some objects to a data grid I would like to display some of the values from the member objects in the data grid as well but the examples I have come across seem to use an entire other datagrid or controls to display these member object values.

How can I combine these values into one data grid? (Preferably without creating a wrapping class) Can I achieve this with LINQ somehow?

Your help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

P.S. C# or VB examples will do.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's no clean way to do this in WinForms. You have a couple of options, ranging from easiest to hardest:

LINQ

(Specifically here anonymous types).

You can do something like this:

dataGridView.DataSource = from x in dataSource
                          select new
                          {
                              Property = x.Property,
                              SubProperty = x.ObjectProperty.SubProperty // etc.
                          };

This is by far the simplest approach, but it's also one-way binding; you cannot update data using this mechanism. This will also give you no design-time support for the grid, as the property names can't be discovered at design time.

Wrapper Class

This, I'm assuming, you're familiar with. You create a class that wraps your actual data-bound class, passing through the properties and bringing up the "sub-properties" to the class level. For example:

public string SubProperty
{
    get { return yourObject.ObjectProperty.SubProperty; }
    set { yourObject.ObjectProperty.SubProperty = value; }
}

This will give you design-time support for the grid (assuming that you use a BindingSource component and properly set up an object data source for this object) and will allow for two-way binding. It does, however, require that you roll a wrapper class and create every property that you want to bind to.

Custom Type Descriptor

This is the most difficult, but it's also the most flexible, fastest, and cleanest (from an external API perspective). I won't go into the ins and outs of how to do this in this post, but there are articles available on this. I would link to the MSDN page on custom TypeDescriptors, but it's a little daunting and extends beyond the scope of what you're trying to do.

In short, you create a custom TypeDescriptor class that provides a list of PropertyDescriptor instances. These allow you complete control over the binding experience, rather than relying on reflection (as would be the case in either of the above two cases). This is a non-trivial amount of code, though, so you'll need to decide if this is what you really want to do before you set out to do it.

This is a pretty good introduction to the TypeDescriptor class and what it does. What you're interested here is the PropertyDescriptorCollection. You just need to return a PropertyDescriptor for every property you want to interact with, including nested properties.

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Thanks Adam, this is what I feared. A link for the Custom Type Descriptor may actually be useful, if not now for future reference. Thanks again. –  ChrisAU Mar 31 '10 at 2:36
    
@clawson: See edit. –  Adam Robinson Mar 31 '10 at 2:54
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I faced the same problem recently, and solved it using the third approach suggested above. The DeepBindingList below is similar to a regular BindingList, but with two enhancements:

1) It traverses the sub-properties of each property and exposes them all as bindable properties.

2) It adds support for sorting.

Use in any way you like, I hope it's useful.

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace DeepBindingList
{
    /// Extends the BindingList to provide sorting and deep property
    /// binding (e.g. Address.Street).
    public class DeepBindingList<T> : BindingList<T>, ITypedList
    {
        //-----------------------------------------------------------------------
        #region ** IBindingList overrides (to provide sorting)

        PropertyDescriptor _sort;
        ListSortDirection _direction;

        protected override bool IsSortedCore
        {
            get { return _sort != null; }
        }
        protected override void RemoveSortCore()
        {
            _sort = null;
        }
        protected override ListSortDirection SortDirectionCore
        {
            get { return _direction; }
        }
        protected override PropertyDescriptor SortPropertyCore
        {
            get { return _sort; }
        }
        protected override bool SupportsSortingCore
        {
            get { return true; }
        }
        protected override void ApplySortCore(PropertyDescriptor pd, ListSortDirection direction)
        {
            // get list to sort
            var items = this.Items as List<T>;

            // apply the sort
            if (items != null)
            {
                var pc = new PropertyComparer<T>(pd, direction);
                items.Sort(pc);
            }

            // save new settings and notify listeners
            _sort = pd;
            _direction = direction;
            this.OnListChanged(new ListChangedEventArgs(ListChangedType.Reset, -1));
        }

        // PropertyComparer (used to sort the list)
        class PropertyComparer<TC> : IComparer<TC>
        {
            PropertyDescriptor _pd;
            ListSortDirection _direction;
            public PropertyComparer(PropertyDescriptor pd, ListSortDirection direction)
            {
                _pd = pd;
                _direction = direction;
            }
            public int Compare(TC x, TC y)
            {
                try
                {
                    var v1 = _pd.GetValue(x) as IComparable;
                    var v2 = _pd.GetValue(y) as IComparable;

                    int cmp =
                        v1 == null && v2 == null ? 0 :
                        v1 == null ? +1 :
                        v2 == null ? -1 :
                        v1.CompareTo(v2);

                    return _direction == ListSortDirection.Ascending ? +cmp : -cmp;
                }
                catch 
                {
                    return 0; // comparison failed...
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion

        //-----------------------------------------------------------------------
        #region ** ITypedList (to expose inner properties)

        public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetItemProperties(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
        {
            var list = new List<PropertyDescriptor>();
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor pd in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(T)))
            {
                AddProperties(pd, null, list);
            }
            return new PropertyDescriptorCollection(list.ToArray());
        }
        void AddProperties(PropertyDescriptor pd, PropertyDescriptor parent, List<PropertyDescriptor> list)
        {
            // add this property
            pd = new DeepPropertyDescriptor(pd, parent);
            list.Add(pd);

            // and subproperties for non-value types
            if (!pd.PropertyType.IsValueType && pd.PropertyType != typeof(string))
            {
                foreach (PropertyDescriptor sub in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(pd.PropertyType))
                {
                    AddProperties(sub, pd, list);
                }
            }
        }
        public string GetListName(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
        {
            return null;
        }

        // property descriptor with support for sub properties (e.g. Address.Street)
        class DeepPropertyDescriptor : PropertyDescriptor
        {
            PropertyDescriptor _pd;
            PropertyDescriptor _parentPD;

            public DeepPropertyDescriptor(PropertyDescriptor pd, PropertyDescriptor parentPd)
                : base(pd.Name, null)
            {
                _pd = pd;
                _parentPD = parentPd;
            }
            public override string Name
            {
                get
                {
                    return _parentPD != null
                        ? string.Format("{0}.{1}", _parentPD.Name, _pd.Name)
                        : _pd.Name;
                }
            }
            public override bool IsReadOnly
            {
                get { return _pd.IsReadOnly; }
            }
            public override void ResetValue(object component)
            {
                _pd.ResetValue(component);
            }
            public override bool CanResetValue(object component)
            {
                return _pd.CanResetValue(component);
            }
            public override bool ShouldSerializeValue(object component)
            {
                return _pd.ShouldSerializeValue(component);
            }
            public override Type ComponentType
            {
                get { return _pd.ComponentType; }
            }
            public override Type PropertyType
            {
                get { return _pd.PropertyType; }
            }
            public override object GetValue(object component)
            {
                if (_parentPD != null)
                {
                    component = _parentPD.GetValue(component);
                }
                return _pd.GetValue(component);
            }
            public override void SetValue(object component, object value)
            {
                _pd.SetValue(_parentPD.GetValue(component), value);
                OnValueChanged(component, EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }
}
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Oops... I meant

        public override void SetValue(object component, object value)
        {
            if (_parentPD != null)
            {
                component = _parentPD.GetValue(component);
            }
            _pd.SetValue(component, value);
            OnValueChanged(component, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
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I found Bernardo's DeepBindingList to be a life-saver, and now I'd like to give something back by pointing out that the code has trouble with cycles. Meaning, if T has a member that's of type T, or that itself has a member of type T, then the recursion in GetItemProperties() will cause the stack to blow up.

There are different ways to deal with a problem like that, but the one I implemented takes advantage of the fact that I always know in advance which properties will be used as the columns of my grid. So, I created a method to get the properties for just those columns:

private PropertyDescriptorCollection propertyDescriptors;

public void SetItemProperties(IList<string> names)
{
    var list = new List<PropertyDescriptor>();
    foreach (var name in names)
        AddProperty(name, list);
    propertyDescriptors = new PropertyDescriptorCollection(list.ToArray());
}

private void AddProperty(string name, List<PropertyDescriptor> list)
{
    Type propType = typeof (T);
    PropertyDescriptor parent = null;
    foreach (var part in name.Split('.'))
    {
        PropertyDescriptor prop = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(propType).Cast<PropertyDescriptor>().FirstOrDefault(pd => pd.Name == part);
        if (prop == null)
            return;
        list.Add(new DeepPropertyDescriptor(prop, parent));
        propType = prop.PropertyType;
        parent = prop;
    }
}

(I didn't bother avoiding duplicate PropertyDescriptors that can arise when two-or-more "grandchildren" share the same parent, as in T.a.b and T.a.c. They haven't caused me any trouble so I left that for the next person to fix.)

I added a test to the beginning of GetItemProperties(), so:

public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetItemProperties(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
{
    if (propertyDescriptors != null)
        return propertyDescriptors;

That way it does nothing if I've already called SetItemProperties().

I also found that the constructor that takes a list argument was too limiting, so I replaced

public DeepBindingList(IList<T> list)
    : base(list)
{
}

with

public DeepBindingList(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    foreach (var t in list)
    {
        Add(t);
    }
}

I hope someone finds this useful.

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