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So I'm familiar with the fields pragma in Perl that can be used to restrict the fields that are stored in a class:

package Fruit;
use fields qw( color shape taste );

sub new {
  my ( $class, $params ) = @_;
  my $self = fields::new( $class ) unless ref $class;
  foreach my $name ( keys %$params ) {
    $self->{ $name } = $params->{ $name };
  }
  return $self;
}

Once I've declared the fields at the top, how I can get the list back, say because I want to generate accessors dynamically? Is keys %FIELDS the only way?

Secondarily, is there a more efficient way to pre-populate the fields in the constructor than looping through and assigning each parameter as I am doing above?

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1  
Why are you using fields? –  Sinan Ünür Mar 31 '10 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are working in Perl 5.10 and up (really 5.9 and up, but I don't count development releases), fields creates a restricted hash. See Hash::Util for info on restricted hashes.

To get all the fields available to a restricted hash, use the legal_keys or legal_ref_keys functions:

use Hash::Util qw( legal_ref_keys );

my $froot = Fruit->new();
my @attribs = legal_ref_keys($froot);

You could do a number of things to generate your methods automatically:

  1. Create a temporary object during construction and query it for legal keys so that you can create attributes --- UGLY
  2. AUTOLOAD attributes by querying the object for a list of legal keys. CODE SMELL ALERT: this assumes that all subclasses will use the same underlying data structure.
  3. Access the %FIELDS hash in the module to generate methods at compile time or through AUTOLOAD. MORE PROBLEMS - assumes that an unpublished bit of fields pragma will remain.
  4. Define an array of attributes at compile time and autogenerate methods and set fields based on the value.
  5. Give up on writing all this boilerplate and use Moose.

Option 4:

package Fruit;
use strict; 
use warnings;

my @ATTRIBUTES;
BEGIN { @ATTRIBUTES =  qw( color shape taste ); }

use fields @ATTRIBUTES;

for my $attrib ( @ATTRIBUTES ) {
    my $getset = sub {
        my $self = shift;

        if( @_ ) {
            $self->{$attrib} = shift;
        }

        return $self->{$attrib};
    };

    {    no strict 'refs';
         *{$attrib} = $getset;
    }
}


sub new {
  my ( $class, $params ) = @_;
  my $self = fields::new( $class ) unless ref $class;
  foreach my $name ( keys %$params ) {
    $self->{ $name } = $params->{ $name };
  }
  return $self;
}

Option 5.

package Fruit;
use Moose;

has 'color' => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'Str',
);

has 'shape' => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'Str',
);

has 'taste' => (
    is => 'rw',
    isa => 'Str',
);
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1  
If they're all identical property accessors, you can pass an arrayref into moose: package Fruit; use Moose; my @attrs = qw/color taste shape/; has \@attrs => ( is => 'rw', isa => 'Str', ); no Moose; –  Oesor Mar 31 '10 at 10:43
1  
Class::Accessor in conjunction with the fields pragma is nice, but in the modern era I'd just chuck all that and go with Moose. –  Ether Mar 31 '10 at 15:10
    
Second and third the "Give up on Fields and use Moose." –  Robert P Mar 31 '10 at 15:54
    
Not a big fan of Moose, but you did answer my question. :) –  makenai Mar 31 '10 at 16:27
    
Eh, I did say you answered it and I awarded you the answer though? –  makenai Apr 1 '10 at 1:41

Every object created where the fields pragma is in use will have those fields (and only those fields) defined, even if you don't initialize them. So you don't have to worry about the %FIELDS table being deprecated.

  DB<1> $apple = Fruit->new( {qw(color red shape apple taste like-an-apple)} )

  DB<2> p join' ',keys %$apple
color taste shape
  DB<3> $kiwi = Fruit->new()

  DB<4> p join' ',keys %$kiwi
color taste shape
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Hey mobrule - what are you using in your example? It looks like an interactive perl shell like irb for ruby? –  makenai Mar 31 '10 at 7:10
    
Hm.. just noticed I don't get the same behavior as you under 5.10.1 - calling keys on %$self or %$apple gives me an undefined value unless I've specifically set something. :( –  makenai Mar 31 '10 at 7:24
    
That's the perl debugger –  Dave Sherohman Mar 31 '10 at 9:41

Right now the best working solution I have is something like this:

# Return the fields for this object
sub fields {
    my ( $self ) = @_;
    my $class = ref( $self ) || $self;
    return [ keys %{ "${class}::FIELDS" } ];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd suggest returning a list rather than a listref, but otherwise yes, that works. –  Ether Mar 31 '10 at 15:11

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