Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a standard .NET windows service written in C#.

Can it install itself without using InstallUtil? Should I use the service installer class? How should I use it?

I want to be able to call the following:

MyService.exe -install

and it will have the same effect as calling:

InstallUtil MyService.exe

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 116 down vote accepted

Yes, that is fully possible (i.e. I do exactly this); you just need to reference the right dll (System.ServiceProcess.dll) and add an installer class...

Here's an example.

share|improve this answer
13  
+1d, see also stackoverflow.com/questions/1449994/… –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 29 '10 at 9:22
    
@Adil works fine from here –  Marc Gravell Oct 12 '12 at 5:24
    
Its my fault, forgot that my kind proxy would be stopping me from https, I will delete my comments and request you to delete yours as they are not useful. –  Adil Oct 12 '12 at 5:33

Take a look at the InstallHelper method of the ManagedInstaller class. You can install a service using:

string[] args;
ManagedInstallerClass.InstallHelper(args);

This is exactly what InstallUtil does. The arguments are the same as for InstallUtil.

The benefits of this method are that it involves no messing in the registry, and it uses the same mechanism as InstallUtil.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for being very simple –  romkyns Nov 28 '09 at 14:02
1  
+1d, see also stackoverflow.com/questions/1449994/… –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 29 '10 at 9:22
6  
Why do you suggest this when the docs say this is not meant to be called by user code? –  Leeks and Leaks Apr 15 '10 at 19:50
5  
I use this method because 1. it is simple 2. it is exactly what InstallUtil does 3. you don't need to change the installer when on x86/x64 4. it hasn't changed in several versions of .Net - if it does, it will be picked up in testing and I will fix it then. –  adrianbanks Jan 15 '11 at 23:48

You can always fall back to the good old WinAPI calls, although the amount of work involved is non-trivial. There is no requirement that .NET services be installed via a .NET-aware mechanism.

To install:

  • Open the service manager via OpenSCManager.
  • Call CreateService to register the service.
  • Optionally call ChangeServiceConfig2 to set a description.
  • Close the service and service manager handles with CloseServiceHandle.

To uninstall:

  • Open the service manager via OpenSCManager.
  • Open the service using OpenService.
  • Delete the service by calling DeleteService on the handle returned by OpenService.
  • Close the service and service manager handles with CloseServiceHandle.

The main reason I prefer this over using the ServiceInstaller/ServiceProcessInstaller is that you can register the service with your own custom command line arguments. For example, you might register it as "MyApp.exe -service", then if the user runs your app without any arguments you could offer them a UI to install/remove the service.

Running Reflector on ServiceInstaller can fill in the details missing from this brief explanation.

P.S. Clearly this won't have "the same effect as calling: InstallUtil MyService.exe" - in particular, you won't be able to uninstall using InstallUtil. But it seems that perhaps this wasn't an actual stringent requirement for you.

share|improve this answer

Here is a class I use when writing services. I usually have an interactive screen that comes up when the service is not called. From there I use the class as needed. It allows for multiple named instances on the same machine -hence the InstanceID field

Sample Call

  IntegratedServiceInstaller Inst = new IntegratedServiceInstaller();
  Inst.Install("MySvc", "My Sample Service", "Service that executes something",
                    _InstanceID,
// System.ServiceProcess.ServiceAccount.LocalService,      // this is more secure, but only available in XP and above and WS-2003 and above
  System.ServiceProcess.ServiceAccount.LocalSystem,       // this is required for WS-2000
  System.ServiceProcess.ServiceStartMode.Automatic);
  if (controller == null)
  {
    controller = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceController(String.Format("MySvc_{0}", _InstanceID), ".");
                }
                if (controller.Status == System.ServiceProcess.ServiceControllerStatus.Running)
                {
                    Start_Stop.Text = "Stop Service";
                    Start_Stop_Debugging.Enabled = false;
                }
                else
                {
                    Start_Stop.Text = "Start Service";
                    Start_Stop_Debugging.Enabled = true;
                }

The class itself

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace MySvc
{
    class IntegratedServiceInstaller
    {
    	public void Install(String ServiceName, String DisplayName, String Description,
            String InstanceID,
    		System.ServiceProcess.ServiceAccount Account, 
    		System.ServiceProcess.ServiceStartMode StartMode)
    	{
    		//http://www.theblacksparrow.com/
    		System.ServiceProcess.ServiceProcessInstaller ProcessInstaller = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceProcessInstaller();
    		ProcessInstaller.Account = Account;

    		System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller SINST = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller();

            System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext Context = new System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext();
    		string processPath = Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
    		if (processPath != null && processPath.Length > 0)
    		{
                System.IO.FileInfo fi = new System.IO.FileInfo(processPath);

                String path = String.Format("/assemblypath={0}", fi.FullName);
                String[] cmdline = { path };
                Context = new System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext("", cmdline);
    		}

    		SINST.Context = Context;
            SINST.DisplayName = String.Format("{0} - {1}", DisplayName, InstanceID);
            SINST.Description = String.Format("{0} - {1}", Description, InstanceID);
    		SINST.ServiceName = String.Format("{0}_{1}", ServiceName, InstanceID);
    		SINST.StartType = StartMode;
    		SINST.Parent = ProcessInstaller;

            // http://bytes.com/forum/thread527221.html
            SINST.ServicesDependedOn = new String[] { "Spooler", "Netlogon", "Netman" };

    		System.Collections.Specialized.ListDictionary state = new System.Collections.Specialized.ListDictionary();
    		SINST.Install(state);

            // http://www.dotnet247.com/247reference/msgs/43/219565.aspx
            using (RegistryKey oKey = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(String.Format(@"SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\{0}_{1}", ServiceName, InstanceID), true))
            {
                try
                {
                    Object sValue = oKey.GetValue("ImagePath");
                    oKey.SetValue("ImagePath", sValue);
                }
                catch (Exception Ex)
                {
                    System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(Ex.Message);
                }
            }

    	}
    	public void Uninstall(String ServiceName, String InstanceID)
    	{
    		//http://www.theblacksparrow.com/
    		System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller SINST = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller();

    		System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext Context = new System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext("c:\\install.log", null);
    		SINST.Context = Context;
            SINST.ServiceName = String.Format("{0}_{1}", ServiceName, InstanceID);
            SINST.Uninstall(null);
    	}
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's about thedavejay.com/2012/04/… ? –  Kiquenet Jun 10 at 7:43

In the case of trying to install a command line application as a Windows service try the 'NSSM' utility. Related ServerFault details found here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.