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Let's make this very easy. What I want:

@array = qw/one two one/;
my @duplicates = duplicate(@array);
print "@duplicates"; # This should now print 'one'.

Thanks =)

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It's not clear exactly what you are trying to accomplish, can you clarify? –  Robert Gamble Oct 31 '08 at 22:21
    
Everyone want's to remove duplicate values from a array/hash, and that's fine. But I want to KEEP that duplicate value... –  Lasse A Karlsen Oct 31 '08 at 22:32
    
@Robert Gamble: it's not clear exactly what you find not clear, can you clarify? :) –  ysth Nov 2 '08 at 2:44
    
@Ysth: the question was edited to make it clear ;-) –  Leon Timmermans Nov 2 '08 at 23:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted
sub duplicate {
    my @args = @_;
    my %items;
    for my $element(@args) {
        $items{$element}++;
    }
    return grep {$items{$_} > 1} keys %items;
}
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I think there is a semicolon missing after the hash declaration. –  Svante Nov 1 '08 at 2:21
    
You're right, I've added it now. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 1 '08 at 2:47
# assumes inputs can be hash keys
@a = (1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5);

# keep count for each unique input
%h = ();
map { $h{$_}++  } @a;

# duplicate inputs have count > 1
@dupes = grep { $h{$_} > 1 } keys %h;

# should print 3, 4
print join(", ", sort @dupes), "\n";
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Write $h{$_}++ for @a; instead of using map in void context. –  Aristotle Pagaltzis Nov 2 '08 at 4:04

The extra verbose, extra readable version of what you want to do:


sub duplicate {
   my %value_hash;
   foreach my $val (@_) {
     $value_hash{$val} +=1;
   }
   my @arr;
   while (my ($val, $num) = each(%value_hash)) {
     if ($num > 1) {
        push(@arr, $val)
     }
   }
  return @arr;
}

This can be shortened considerably, but I intentionally left it verbose so that you can follow along.

I didn't test it, though, so watch out for my typos.

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@array = qw/one two one/ is a perfectly acceptable way of writing that. –  Alnitak Nov 1 '08 at 0:57
    
I wrote that before Brian D Foy fixed up the original question. He had scalars there originally.. but I've now removed the "first off" comment, since it no longer makes sense. –  SquareCog Nov 3 '08 at 0:11

Use a dictionary, put the value in the key, and the count in the value.

Ah, just noticed you've tagged as perl

while ([...]) {
 $hash{[dbvalue]}++
}
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Eh... it's starting to get a little late, I really think I need som code examples. ;-) –  Lasse A Karlsen Oct 31 '08 at 22:34

Unspecified in the question is the order in which the duplicates should be returned.

I can think of several possibilities: don't care; by order of first/second/last occurrence in the input list; sorted.

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I'm going golfing!

sub duplicate {
    my %count;
    grep $count{$_}++, @_;
}

@array = qw/one two one/;
my @duplicates = duplicate(@array);
print "@duplicates"; # This should now print 'one'.

# or if returning *exactly* 1 occurrence of each duplicated item is important
sub duplicate {
    my %count;
    grep ++$count{$_} == 2, @_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That code has an issue in that it will return an element more than once when it occurs three or more times. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 2 '08 at 0:40
    
Right, you want grep 1==$count{$_}++, ... –  ysth Nov 2 '08 at 2:48
    
Also, you want to put braces around that. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 2 '08 at 13:53
    
It depends on whether you want 2 of 3 occurrances returned, or only 1; the question didn't specify. Braces aren't needed. –  ephemient Nov 2 '08 at 15:47

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