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I want to be able to count "end points" in an XML file using XSL. By endpoint I mean tag's with no children that contain data.

i.e.

<xmlsnippet> 
    <tag1>NOTENOUGHDAYS</tag1> 
    <tag2>INVALIDINPUTS</tag2> 
    <tag3> 
        <tag4> 
            <tag5>2</tag5> 
            <tag6>1</tag6> 
        </tag4> 
    </tag3> 
</xmlsnippet> 

This XML should return 4 as there are 4 "end points"

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Do you means nodes that have no child node? We also need to know what language you are wanting to use, else you will get a loose pseudo code answer. –  thecoshman Mar 31 '10 at 9:05
    
Using XSL. The XML format is quite loose, so I want to count anything that has no child nodes but may contain data. –  Chris Mar 31 '10 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
<xsl:template match="/>
  <xsl:value-of select="count(//*[not(*) and normalize-space() != ''])" />
</xsl:template>

This recurses the entire XML tree via the descendant axis (//), looks at all element nodes (*) that have no child element nodes (not(*)) and contain data other than whitespace (normalize-space() != '').

The resulting node-set is counted (and returns 4 in your case).

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This looks good but the XML I posted is just a snippet so I need to call something like select="count(//ParentTag/xmlsnippet/*[not(*) and normalize-space() != ''])" - this returns 2 not 4. What am I doing wrong? –  Chris Mar 31 '10 at 9:42
1  
Aha, I used this and it worked select="count(ParentTag/xmlsnippet//*[not(*) and normalize-space() != ''])" –  Chris Mar 31 '10 at 9:42

*[not(*)] is used for elements that has no children elements.

edit: for counting them just use count(elements)

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How do I do this recursively? –  Chris Mar 31 '10 at 9:13

Try:-

 <xsl:variable name="numOfLeafNodes" select="count(//*[not(*)])" />

this will tell you how many leaf nodes are found in the whole xml being transformed. Use:-

 <xsl:variable name="numOfLeafNodes" select="count(.//*[not(*)])" />

to find the count of leaf nodes that are descendents of the current context node.

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If I do this <xsl:variable name="numOfLeafNodes" select="count(ParentTag/xmlsnippet/*[not(*)])" /> then it returns 2 not 4. –  Chris Mar 31 '10 at 9:28
    
@Chris: Indeed, but this would return 4: count(ParentTag/xmlsnippet//*[not(*)]) note the // to which is a short-cut for descendents:: axis. Also noticed I had missed out the actual count function itself. –  AnthonyWJones Mar 31 '10 at 10:02

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