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I'm helping out a friend with a non-profit site that publishes articles in issues each month. They are mostly straightforward, and I think using a markdown editor (like the wmd one here in SO) would be perfect. However, they do need the ability to have images right-aligned in a given paragraph. I can't see any way to do that with the current system - is it possible?

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Note that depending on the platform you can add filters to markdown. So it may be possible to add syntax that specifies alignment. –  Jordan Reiter Apr 4 '12 at 18:26
    
Why not just ask the question without the "I'm helping out a friend with a non-profit site that publishes articles in issues each month"? –  JGallardo Mar 14 at 17:35
    
@JGallardo Because I wanted to make it clear I didn't have complete control over the system, nor did I have the ability to purchase any type of solution. I agree that I could have phrased the question differently. –  Jedidja Mar 22 at 10:51

9 Answers 9

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You can embed html in markdown, so you can do something like this:

<img style="float: right" src="whatever.jpg" />

Continue markdown text...
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27  
Clean it up & standardize by strippnig the unnecessary div and adding a closing slash to the img tag, respectively, i.e. `<img style="float:right" src="whatever.jpg" /> –  MattDiPasquale Nov 14 '10 at 14:54
    
Instead of div I prefer using span for inline indenting. For full paragraph centering div is good, or even simple p. –  Eye Sep 6 '12 at 11:15
3  
This work better with some sanitized interpreters like the GitHub's one: <img align="right" src="whatever.jpg" /> –  benweet May 5 '13 at 9:50
4  
@MattDiPasquale Closing slashes are not necessary. That's XHTML, not HTML. –  CaptSaltyJack Dec 13 '13 at 21:10

Embedding CSS is bad:

![Flowers](/flowers.jpeg)

CSS in another file:

img[alt=Flowers] { float: right; }
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27  
What? Now all of a sudden you have to edit an external file every time you change the markdown content? Doesn't sound like a good solution to me. –  Jordan Reiter Jul 20 '11 at 18:21
3  
@JordanReiter Everyone here has written a program consisting of more than one file where logic is spread/organized over many locations. We do it on purpose for maintainability. Why is this so painfully and terribly different? –  z5h Apr 4 '12 at 17:43
3  
Markdown lets non-programmer users create content and it shouldn't be dependent on files that have to be directly accessed and edited on the server. Another example: I think it's totally normal to hard-code the names of fields in a database into your code but a mistake to hard-code based on the value of a field in your database (i.e. if product.name == 'Tulips') because you can't depend on the stability of the value. All it takes is someone changing Flowers to Flower and suddenly that image pops out of view. Also, they have to call you every time they add an image! –  Jordan Reiter Apr 4 '12 at 18:24
    
Thanks, I've found this very handy. The accepted solution does not seem to work on a Jekyll-based github-hosted site. I set the alt text to be "floatright", since I don't care what alttext is, this is a nice way to easily control my image placement in markdown. –  cboettig Apr 12 '12 at 0:08
10  
@cboettig This is severe misuse of the alt tag. It is supposed to be a textual description of the image for people who can't see the image. –  Nathan Grigg May 15 '12 at 23:37

Many Markdown "extra" processors support attributes. So you can include a class name like so (PHP Markdown Extra):

![Flowers](/flowers.jpeg){.callout}

or, alternatively (Kramdown):

![Flowers](/flowers.jpeg){: .callout}

Then, of course, you can use a stylesheet the proper way:

.callout {
    float: right;
}

If yours supports this syntax, it gives you the best of both worlds: no embedded markup, and a stylesheet abstract enough to not need to be modified by your content editor.

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<div style="float:left;margin:0 10px 10px 0" markdown="1">
    ![book](/images/book01.jpg)
</div>

The attribute markdown possibility inside markdown.

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4  
Nope. Not on github markdown. –  maletor Aug 19 '11 at 7:56
1  
Worked to me. I am not using github. Thanks @raphox. –  Hugo Tavares Feb 23 '12 at 15:13
    
Works fine with michelf's vanilla markdown PHP parser –  Ronan Jul 7 '13 at 14:53
    
This is Markdown Extra functionality, which is included in some content management systems (e.g. Drupal), but is not included functionality in Markdown per se. –  Tim May 15 at 13:05

Even cleaner would be to just put p#given img { float: right } in the style sheet, or in the <head> and wrapped in style tags. Then, just use the markdown ![Alt text](/path/to/img.jpg).

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1  
Can you plz elaborate? –  zvolkov Aug 1 '11 at 20:56

I like to be super lazy by using tables to align images with the vertical pipe (|) syntax. This is supported by some markdown flavours (and is also supported by textile if that floats your boat)

| I am text to the left  | ![Flowers](/flowers.jpeg) |

or

| ![Flowers](/flowers.jpeg) | I am text to the right |

Not the most flexible solution, but it is good for most of my simple needs, is easy to read in markdown format, and you don't need to remember any CSS or raw HTML.

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I like this style, very markdown-y. Too bad it doesn't work on github (not yet anyway.) –  Eliot May 2 at 15:58

As greg said you can embed html in markdown.. but one of the points of markdown is to avoid having to have extensive (or any, for that matter) css/html markup knowledge right? This is what I do:

in my markdown file I simply instruct all my wiki editors to embed wrap all images with something that looks like this

'<div> // put image here  </div>`

(of course.. they donno what <div> means but that shouldn't matter)

so the markdown file looks like this:

<div>
![optional img description][1]
</div>

[1]: /image/path

and in the css that wraps the whole page I can do whatever I want with the image tag:

img {
   float: right;
}

of course you can do more with the css.. (in this particular case, wrapping the img with div prevents other text from wrapping against the image.. this is just an example though) but IMHO the point of markdown is that you don't want potentially non-technical people getting into the ins and outs of css/html.. it's up to you as a web-dev to make your css that wraps the page as generic and clean as possible, but then again your editors need not know about that.

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If you implement it in Python, there is an extension that lets you add html key/value pairs, and class/id labels. The syntax is for this is:

![A picture of a cat](cat.png){: style="float:right"}

Or, if embedded styling doesn't float your boat,

![A picture of a cat](cat.png){: .floatright}

with corresponding stylesheet stylish.css:

.floatright {
    float: right;
    /* etc. */
}
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Simplest is to wrap the image in a center tag, like so ...

<center>![Alt test](http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bc/Wiki.png)</center>

Anything to do with Markdown can be tested here - http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/dingus

Sure, <center> may be deprecated, but it's simple and it works!

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1  
Just noticed the OP asked for right alignment -- I was trying to center an image when I stumbled onto this answer. –  yoyo Dec 15 '11 at 6:59
11  
No, never use center. –  Jordan Reiter Apr 4 '12 at 18:25
5  
I'm going to actually side with @yoyo— <center> does make sense. It's deprecated from HTML because HTML is supposed to describe the content only; styles should be in stylesheets. However, Markdown has a different intent: to include enough styling necessary to convey a textual message, and leave the rest up to the renderer/site. <center> seems so much more natural than thinking about CSS widths, floats, margins…— I'd even go as far as having a Markdown parser replace <center> tags with appropriate CSS-backed elements, much like how it currently intelligently figures out paragraphs. –  Slipp D. Thompson Jun 9 '12 at 20:32

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