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Assuming I have 2 STL vectors:

vector<int> a;
vector<int> b;

Let's also say the both have around 30 elements.

  • How do I add the vector b to the end of vector a?

The dirty way would be iterating through b and adding each element via vector<int>::push_back(), though I wouldn't like to do that!

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10  
I guess everyone will post answers using iterators. I've never worked out why vector doesn't have op+=() or an append() function. –  anon Mar 31 '10 at 9:36
18  
@Neil Because insert is sufficient? –  Andreas Brinck Mar 31 '10 at 9:40
6  
@Andreas Well, couldn't the same be said for std::string? Of course insert() is sufficient, but its far from obvious in your answer that what is actually happening is one vector being appended to another. a += b makes this transparent. –  anon Mar 31 '10 at 9:43
9  
@Andreas: It might be sufficient performance-wise, but it's not as easy to read. IMO a.append(b) (or even a+=b) would capture the intent much better than a.insert(a.end(), b.begin(), b.end()). –  sbi Mar 31 '10 at 9:44
8  
@Andreas I take it you are referring to the "fat interface" issue. Some classes should have fat interfaces, and IMHO strings are one of them - I find std::string extemely usable, no matter what purists may say. I simply think that vector could do with putting on a little weight to make life easier for its users and clearer for readers of their code. –  anon Mar 31 '10 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

a.insert(a.end(), b.begin(), b.end());
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26  
@ViktorSehr - this is exactly why it gets so many upvotes! simplicity rules! KISS = Keep It Simple, Stupid! –  Shai Jan 2 '13 at 10:02
    
Do I need to reserve before insert? –  Violet Giraffe Aug 14 '13 at 6:50
    
@VioletGiraffe reserve is not required but may be advisable. It's smart to use reserve if you are repeatedly inserting into a vector for which you know the final size, and that size is large. Otherwise, I'd let the STL grow your vector as needed. –  moodboom Sep 10 '13 at 16:24
7  
This solution fails if you try to append vector to itself. It generates vector with correct size but adds empty elements instead of original. And it begins working only if you prepend it by v.reserve(v.size()*2); (but it may depend on STL implementation) –  Sergey Nov 14 '13 at 17:16
1  
@Sergey I believe that the standard specifically says that the iterators given to insert must not be from the same range as the receiver object's elements, so I suppose that technically speaking it's UB. –  templatetypedef Jan 30 at 21:47
std::copy (b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(a));
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28  
Note that this is likely to be less efficient than using std::vector<>::insert(), because std::copy() can't reserve enough space before-hand (it doesn't have access to the vector itself, only to an iterator which has), while std::vector<>::insert(), being a member function, can. (It needs to figure out that the iterators to read from are random-access iterators in order to pre-calculate the sequence's length, but it would be a weak implementation which wouldn't do this.) –  sbi Mar 31 '10 at 9:42
2  
True in practice, but in theory the std:: implementor can make it work. They can use non-standard extensions internally. –  MSalters Mar 31 '10 at 10:38
4  
@MSalter: I know that an implementation could do this. This is why I wrote it is "likely to be less efficient". In theory, an implementer could add a private interface to std::back_inserter_iterator<std::vector<T>> to allow an implementation of std::copy() to recognize it and use this private interface to get hold of the std::vector and call reserve() on it. In practice, however, it's unlikely any implementer jumps through all these hoops to optimize such a corner case. –  sbi Mar 31 '10 at 14:07
2  
@sbi's criticism is correct, atleast for libstdc++. std::copy is indeed slower than using std::vector::insert. I just tested it with libstdc++ that came with g++ 4.4.5. –  Marc Claesen May 30 '13 at 21:43
1  
@Sergey, tring to append vector to itself is UB: stackoverflow.com/questions/14791984/… –  skwllsp Nov 14 '13 at 19:09

While saying "the compiler can reserve", why rely on it? And what about automatic detection of move semantics? And what about all that repeating of the container name with the begins and ends?

Wouldn't you want something, you know, simpler?

(Scroll down to main for the punchline)

#include <type_traits>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

template<typename C,typename=void> struct can_reserve: std::false_type {};

template<typename T, typename A>
struct can_reserve<std::vector<T,A>,void>:
    std::true_type
{};

template<int n> struct secret_enum { enum class type {}; };
template<int n>
using SecretEnum = typename secret_enum<n>::type;

template<bool b, int override_num=1>
using EnableFuncIf = typename std::enable_if< b, SecretEnum<override_num> >::type;
template<bool b, int override_num=1>
using DisableFuncIf = EnableFuncIf< !b, -override_num >;

template<typename C, EnableFuncIf< can_reserve<C>::value >... >
void try_reserve( C& c, std::size_t n ) {
  c.reserve(n);
}
template<typename C, DisableFuncIf< can_reserve<C>::value >... >
void try_reserve( C& c, std::size_t ) { } // do nothing

template<typename C,typename=void>
struct has_size_method:std::false_type {};
template<typename C>
struct has_size_method<C, typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<
  decltype( std::declval<C>().size() ),
  decltype( std::declval<C>().size() )
>::value>::type>:std::true_type {};

namespace adl_aux {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  template<typename C>
  auto adl_begin(C&&c)->decltype( begin(std::forward<C>(c)) );
  template<typename C>
  auto adl_end(C&&c)->decltype( end(std::forward<C>(c)) );
}
template<typename C>
struct iterable_traits {
    typedef decltype( adl_aux::adl_begin(std::declval<C&>()) ) iterator;
    typedef decltype( adl_aux::adl_begin(std::declval<C const&>()) ) const_iterator;
};
template<typename C> using Iterator = typename iterable_traits<C>::iterator;
template<typename C> using ConstIterator = typename iterable_traits<C>::const_iterator;
template<typename I> using IteratorCategory = typename std::iterator_traits<I>::iterator_category;

template<typename C, EnableFuncIf< has_size_method<C>::value, 1>... >
std::size_t size_at_least( C&& c ) {
    return c.size();
}

template<typename C, EnableFuncIf< !has_size_method<C>::value &&
  std::is_base_of< std::random_access_iterator_tag, IteratorCategory<Iterator<C>> >::value, 2>... >
std::size_t size_at_least( C&& c ) {
    using std::begin; using std::end;
  return end(c)-begin(c);
};
template<typename C, EnableFuncIf< !has_size_method<C>::value &&
  !std::is_base_of< std::random_access_iterator_tag, IteratorCategory<Iterator<C>> >::value, 3>... >
std::size_t size_at_least( C&& c ) {
  return 0;
};

template < typename It >
auto try_make_move_iterator(It i, std::true_type)
-> decltype(make_move_iterator(i))
{
    return make_move_iterator(i);
}
template < typename It >
It try_make_move_iterator(It i, ...)
{
    return i;
}


#include <iostream>
template<typename C1, typename C2>
C1&& append_containers( C1&& c1, C2&& c2 )
{
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  try_reserve( c1, size_at_least(c1) + size_at_least(c2) );

  using is_rvref = std::is_rvalue_reference<C2&&>;
  c1.insert( end(c1),
             try_make_move_iterator(begin(c2), is_rvref{}),
             try_make_move_iterator(end(c2), is_rvref{}) );

  return std::forward<C1>(c1);
}

struct append_infix_op {} append;
template<typename LHS>
struct append_on_right_op {
  LHS lhs;
  template<typename RHS>
  LHS&& operator=( RHS&& rhs ) {
    return append_containers( std::forward<LHS>(lhs), std::forward<RHS>(rhs) );
  }
};

template<typename LHS>
append_on_right_op<LHS> operator+( LHS&& lhs, append_infix_op ) {
  return { std::forward<LHS>(lhs) };
}
template<typename LHS,typename RHS>
typename std::remove_reference<LHS>::type operator+( append_on_right_op<LHS>&& lhs, RHS&& rhs ) {
  typename std::decay<LHS>::type retval = std::forward<LHS>(lhs.lhs);
  return append_containers( std::move(retval), std::forward<RHS>(rhs) );
}

template<typename C>
void print_container( C&& c ) {
  for( auto&& x:c )
    std::cout << x << ",";
  std::cout << "\n";
};

int main() {
  std::vector<int> a = {0,1,2};
  std::vector<int> b = {3,4,5};
  print_container(a);
  print_container(b);
  a +append= b;
  const int arr[] = {6,7,8};
  a +append= arr;
  print_container(a);
  print_container(b);
  std::vector<double> d = ( std::vector<double>{-3.14, -2, -1} +append= a );
  print_container(d);
  std::vector<double> c = std::move(d) +append+ a;
  print_container(c);
  print_container(d);
  std::vector<double> e = c +append+ std::move(a);
  print_container(e);
  print_container(a);
}

hehe.

Now with move-data-from-rhs, append-array-to-container, append forward_list-to-container, move-container-from-lhs, thanks to @DyP's help.

Note that the above does not compile in clang thanks to the EnableFunctionIf<>... technique. In clang this workaround works.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you can simplify this, e.g. the try_reserve part –  dyp May 30 '13 at 21:26
    
Where do you use size_at_least? (I can only see declaration/definition, but no call..) –  dyp May 30 '13 at 21:30
    
Only added the "insert-by-move" –  dyp May 30 '13 at 21:41
4  
Lol............ –  James Jun 1 '13 at 15:13
3  
@BrainGordon You do know that the above post is pretty much a joke? C++ has a turing-complete compile time sublanguage, using it to its full potential does quite often create write-only code. The punch line of the joke is in main, where if you skip the code-salad above, is shockingly readable: the humor is that this is "simpler", which is far, far, far from the case. What that unreadable code-salad does is adds a named operator to the language: there is no support in C++ for named operators, so it does it via strange tricks. It is also poorly written: I have gotten better since. –  Yakk Feb 3 at 20:33

If you would like to add vector to itself both popular solutions will fail:

std::vector<std::string> v, orig;

orig.push_back("first");
orig.push_back("second");

// BAD:
v = orig;
v.insert(v.end(), v.begin(), v.end());
// Now v contains: { "first", "second", "", "" }

// BAD:
v = orig;
std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::back_inserter(v));
// std::bad_alloc exception is generated

// GOOD, but I can't guarantee it will work with any STL:
v = orig;
v.reserve(v.size()*2);
v.insert(v.end(), v.begin(), v.end());
// Now v contains: { "first", "second", "first", "second" }

// GOOD, but I can't guarantee it will work with any STL:
v = orig;
v.reserve(v.size()*2);
std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::back_inserter(v));
// Now v contains: { "first", "second", "first", "second" }

// GOOD (best):
v = orig;
v.insert(v.end(), orig.begin(), orig.end()); // note: we use different vectors here
// Now v contains: { "first", "second", "first", "second" }
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