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I've drawn a border around a Custom Control, but now when I try to draw a small rectangle inside of the Custom Control after (or even before) drawing the initial border, it does not draw/get displayed on the Control when the mouse is moving over the Control.

I put a Console.WriteLine(...) in the OnPaint method to see if it's being hit, but nothing is output to the Console/Output Pane. The only time it output anything was when the Control first loaded. But then if the else clause is being hit, why doesn't the small rectangle get drawn when the mouse is moving over the Control?

You can safely ignore anything inside the Borders region, thus the code is not shown.

namespace JTS.Controls
{
    public partial class ListBox : Control
    {
        public enum ListBoxBorders
        {
            Top,
            Bottom,
            Left,
            Right,
            All,
            None
        }

        ListBoxBorders SelectedListBoxBorder = ListBoxBorders.All;

        [Browsable(true)]
        [Description("Defines which borders are drawn onto the ListBox."), Category("Appearance")]
        public ListBoxBorders ListBoxBorder
        {
            get { return SelectedListBoxBorder; }
            set { SelectedListBoxBorder = value; }
        }

        public enum BorderStyles
        {
            Top,
            Bottom,
            Left,
            Right,
            All,
            None
        }

        Graphics graphics;

        protected bool mouseMoving;

        public ListBox()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void ListBox_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Handled.");
            mouseMoving = true;

            this.Update(); // it works if Refresh is called
        }

        protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs pe)
        {
            graphics = pe.Graphics;

            #region Borders
            // logic to draw right-edge border.
            #endregion

            if (mouseMoving)
            {
                // ************************************
                // THIS PART NEVER GETS EXECUTED.
                // ************************************
                Console.WriteLine(mouseMoving.ToString());
                graphics.DrawRectangle(new Pen(
                            Color.Green, 1), new Rectangle(
                                5, 5, 50, 50));
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine(mouseMoving.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}

Edit: After I change this.Update to this.Refresh, everything works. Can somebody explain why?

share|improve this question
    
I would not keep that graphics variable outside of the scope of the Paint event. You can't do anything with it after the paint event is completed. –  LarsTech Aug 27 at 19:22
    
@LarsTech Thanks for the advice! –  jay_t55 Aug 27 at 19:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to understand what's the difference and relationship among Invalidate, Update and Refresh. Here is a very good blog about it, you can read my summary if you are lazy :)

In short: Invaidate only invalidates the client area, but never update it; Update will update the invalidated client area to the new look; Refresh essentially ends up with calling Invalidate followed by Update.

Now let's discuss things in details.

Before we look into your issue, let's look into how winforms control get painted.

All controls paint actually responses to WM_PAINT messages. As a short summary, this message is sent in the following conditions:

  • UpdateWindow or RedrawWindow is called, or
  • DispatchMessage dispatches a WM_PAINT from the message queue.

When a control gets a WM_PAINT message, it paints its background followed by the foreground if necessary, and then the OnPaint event is fired to perform user-defined custom painting.

With the background, let's talk about Invalidate, Update and Refresh.

Invalidate ... essentially ends up calling one of the RedrawWindow, InvaliateRect or InvalidateRgn functions. If RedrawWindow is called then this may result in a WM_PAINT message being posted to the application message queue (to invalidate the child controls).

But noted here, the function only "invalidate" or "dirty" the client area by adding it to the current update region of the window of the control. This invalidated region, along with all other areas in the update region, is marked for painting when the next WM_PAINT message is received. As a result you may not see your control refreshing (and showing the invalidation) immediately (or synchronously).

Update calls UpdateWindow function which updates the client area of the control by sending WM_PAINT message to the window (of the control) if the window's update region is not empty. This function sends a WM_PAINT directly to WndProc() bypassing the application message queue.

Thus, if the window update region is previously “invalidated” then calling “update” would immediately "update" (and cause repaint) the invalidation.

Finally, Refresh chained functions above together: it calls Invalidate to invalidate the area, then calls Update to force a refresh.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great answer, I appreciate you taking the time to explain in more detail the differences. Thank you! –  jay_t55 Aug 27 at 18:02
1  
welcome :) if it explains your puzzle, remember to mark it as answer so that others with the same doubt could benefit :D –  nevets Aug 27 at 18:05
    
Already marked :-) Out of curiosity, is your background in C++ by any chance? –  jay_t55 Aug 27 at 18:06
1  
actually it was my first language, but I just used it as an algorithm solving tool and didn't go that deep in C++ haha. –  nevets Aug 27 at 18:10

Well, after posting my question, I thought to myself, "It may have something to do with calling this.Update();. I don't know why, but I changed it to this.Refresh(); and it is now drawing the smaller rectangle as and when expected.

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