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We've been using Xamarin iOS for the last 8 months and developed a non-trivial enterprise app with many screens, features, nested controls. We've done our own MVVM arch, cross platform BLL & DAL as "recommended". We share code between Android and even our BLL/DAL is used on our web product.

All is good except now in release phase of project we discover irreparable memory leaks everywhere in the Xamarin iOS-based app. We've followed all the "guidelines" to resolve this but the reality is that C# GC and Obj-C ARC appear to be incompatible garbage collection mechanisms in the current way they overlay each other in monotouch platform.

The reality we've found is that hard cycles between native objects and managed objects WILL occur and FREQUENTLY for any non-trivial app. It's extremely easy for this to happen anywhere you use lambdas or gesture recognizers for example. Add in the complexity of MVVM and it's almost a guarantee. Miss just one of these situations and entire graphs of objects will never get collected. These graphs will lure other objects in and grow like a cancer, eventually resulting in a prompt and merciless extermination by iOS.

Xamarin's answer is an uninterested deferral of the issue and an unrealistic expectation that "devs should avoid these situations". Careful consideration of this reveals this as an admission that Garbage Collection is essentially broken in Xamarin.

The realization for me now is that you don't really get "garbage collection" in Xamarin iOS in the traditional c# .NET sense. You need employ "garbage maintanence" patterns actually get the GC moving and doing its job, and even then it'll never be perfect - NON DETERMINISTIC.

My company has invested a fortune trying to stop our app from crashing and/or running out of memory. We've basically had to explicitly and recursively dispose every damn thing in sight and implement garbage maintanence patterns into the app, just to stop the crashes and have a viable product we can sell. Our customers are supportive and tolerant, but we know this cannot hold forever. We are hoping Xamarin have a dedicated team working on this issue and get it nailed once and for all. Doesn't look like it, unfortunately.

Question is, is our experience the exception or the rule for non-trivial enterprise-class apps written in Xamarin?

UPDATE

Below is a dispose method i call on top level UIViews when I need them disposed. This is basically what gets the GC moving. Any suggestions, comments, tips, criticisms welcome.

    public static void DisposeEx(this UIView view) {
        try {
            if (view == null)
                return;

            if (view.Handle == IntPtr.Zero)
                return;

            var skipDispose = false;
            var desc = view.Description;
            SystemLog.Debug("Destroying " + desc);
            if (view.Subviews != null) {
                foreach (var subView in view.Subviews) {
                    try {
                        subView.RemoveFromSuperview();
                        subView.DisposeEx();
                    } catch (Exception error) {
                        SystemLog.Exception(error);
                    }
                }
                SystemLog.Debug("Resuming " + desc);
            }

            if (view is UIActivityIndicatorView) {
                var indicatorView = (UIActivityIndicatorView)view;
                if(indicatorView.IsAnimating) {
                    indicatorView.StopAnimating();
                }

            } else if (view is UITableView) {
                var tableView = (UITableView)view;
                if (tableView.DataSource != null) {
                    tableView.DataSource.Dispose();
                }
                tableView.Source = null;
                tableView.Delegate = null;
                tableView.DataSource = null;
                tableView.WeakDelegate = null;
                tableView.WeakDataSource = null;
                foreach (var cell in (tableView.VisibleCells ?? new UITableViewCell[0])) {
                    cell.DisposeEx();
                }
            } else if (view is UICollectionView) {
                skipDispose = true; // UICollectionViewController will throw if we dispose it before it
                var collectionView = (UICollectionView)view;
                if (collectionView.DataSource != null) {
                    collectionView.DataSource.Dispose();
                }
                collectionView.Source = null;
                collectionView.Delegate = null;
                collectionView.DataSource = null;
                collectionView.WeakDelegate = null;
                collectionView.WeakDataSource = null;
                foreach (var cell in (collectionView.VisibleCells ?? new UICollectionViewCell[0])) {
                    cell.DisposeEx();
                }
            } else if (view is UIWebView) {
                var webView = (UIWebView)view;
                if (webView.IsLoading)
                    webView.StopLoading();
                webView.LoadHtmlString(string.Empty, null); // clear display
                webView.Delegate = null;
                webView.WeakDelegate = null;
            } else if (view is UIScrollView){ 
                var scrollView = view as UIScrollView;
                if (scrollView != null) {
                    scrollView.UnsetZoomableContentViewIfApplicable();
                }
            }

            // the below throws intermittently, investigate further since hard-cycles occur with GR's
            /*var gestures = view.GestureRecognizers;
            if (gestures != null) {
                foreach (var gr in gestures) {
                    view.RemoveGestureRecognizer(gr);
                    gr.Dispose();
                }
            }*/

            var constraints = view.Constraints;
            if (constraints != null && constraints.Any() && constraints.All(c => c.Handle != IntPtr.Zero)) {
                view.RemoveConstraints(constraints);
                constraints.ForEach(c => c.Dispose());
            }
            if (view.Layer != null) {
                view.Layer.RemoveAllAnimations();
            }

            if (!skipDispose) {
                view.Dispose();
            } else {
                var breakpoint = 1;
            }
            SystemLog.Debug("Destroyed {1}{0}", desc, (skipDispose ? " (sub views only) " : string.Empty));
        } catch (Exception error) {
            SystemLog.Exception(error);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Where is your reference for "Garbage Collection is essentially broken in Xamarin" ? Personally, I think you are the exception and not the rule. I haven't had any memory issues like you mentioned. The only production related issue I had was with Linking SDKs. –  valdetero Aug 27 '14 at 17:17
    
I wouldn't be so surprise if it were a game application, but for "enterprise" application I am quite skeptical. Let us see some example of your problem and your fix. –  tia Aug 27 '14 at 17:38
    
Herman, I completely agree with you, Garbage Collection IS broken on Xamarin.iOS/MonoTouch. I made the exact same experiences a year ago and even built a "hierarchy cleaner" like the one you posted here. My app is a consumer application with almost ± 35 controllers and it took me more than 3 months to get the memory sh*t out of it. Someone of the Xamarin staff told me they are working on it, but after almost another year I don't see any progress on that, even the samples are full of these anti-pattern lamdas. –  asp_net Oct 19 '14 at 15:50

4 Answers 4

I have shipped a non-trivial app written with Xamarin. Many others have as well.

"Garbage collection" isn't magic. If you create a reference that is attached to the root of your object graph and never detach it, it will not be collected. That's not only true of Xamarin, but of C# on .NET, Java, etc.

button.Click += (sender, e) => { ... } is an anti-pattern, because you don't have a reference to the lambda and you can never remove the event handler from the Click event. Similarly, you have to be careful that you understand what you're doing when you create references between managed and unmanaged objects.

As for "We've done our own MVVM arch", there are high profile MVVM libraries (MvvmCross, ReactiveUI, and MVVM Light Toolkit), all of which take reference/leak issues very seriously.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is also MvvmLight which now has support for Xamarin. So actually 3! –  Cheesebaron Aug 27 '14 at 19:38
    
Thanks, I knew i was forgetting one. I'll edit my answer. –  anthony Aug 27 '14 at 20:12
    
Basically, whenever working on something more serious than just a toy app, you have to look into how you keep references to objects. Especially Bitmaps are memory hogs, which need to be handled carefully. I suggest everyone look into the ReactiveUI stuff. If you are not into that, you will have to look into Weak References, even on EventHandlers, they make life so much easier. Weak References make up a lot of MvvmCross, even ReactiveUI relies on it. Either do that or make sure you release EVERY object you create at some point in their life. –  Cheesebaron Aug 27 '14 at 20:26
    
@anthony: an isolated cycle of references between native and managed objects will never get collected in xamarin. This is essentially the problem. If Xamarin is supposed to work like C# .NET, it should collect these cycles. Putting the onus on the developer to explicitly break these cycles is not only unreasonable, but an admission that GC doesn't work in Xamarin like it should work on any reasonable managed environment that claims it as a feature. –  Herman Schoenfeld Aug 28 '14 at 1:06
    
@anthony Your button.Click example is only an anti-pattern if the publisher (Button) outlives the subscriber. But I agree, it is easy to get circular references which can be hard to break. –  Krumelur Nov 20 '14 at 21:31

I noticed in your DisposeEx method you dispose of the collection view source and table view source before you kill the visible cells of that collection. I noticed when debugging that the visible cells property gets set to an empty array therefore, when you start to dispose visible cells, they no longer "exist" hence it becomes an array of zero elements.

Another thing I noticed is that you will run into inconsistency exceptions if you don't remove the parameter view from its super view, I've noticed especially with setting the layout of the collection view.

Other than that I've had to implement something similar on our side.

share|improve this answer
    
that code was old. I've posted the answerw which should address most of what you raised. –  Herman Schoenfeld Nov 22 '14 at 2:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I used the below extension methods to solve these memory leak issues. Think of Ender's Game final battle scene, the DisposeEx method is like that laser and it disassociates all views and their connected objects and disposes them recursively and in a way that shouldn't crash your app.

Just call DisposeEx() on UIViewController's main view when you no longer need that view controller. If some nested UIView has special things to dispose, or you dont want it disposed, implement ISpecialDisposable.SpecialDispose which is called in place of IDisposable.Dispose.

NOTE: this assumes no UIImage instances are shared in your app. If they are, modify DisposeEx to intelligently dispose.

    public static void DisposeEx(this UIView view) {
        const bool enableLogging = false;
        try {
            if (view.IsDisposedOrNull())
                return;

            var viewDescription = string.Empty;

            if (enableLogging) {
                viewDescription = view.Description;
                SystemLog.Debug("Destroying " + viewDescription);
            }

            var disposeView = true;
            var disconnectFromSuperView = true;
            var disposeSubviews = true;
            var removeGestureRecognizers = false; // WARNING: enable at your own risk, may causes crashes
            var removeConstraints = true;
            var removeLayerAnimations = true;
            var associatedViewsToDispose = new List<UIView>();
            var otherDisposables = new List<IDisposable>();

            if (view is UIActivityIndicatorView) {
                var aiv = (UIActivityIndicatorView)view;
                if (aiv.IsAnimating) {
                    aiv.StopAnimating();
                }
            } else if (view is UITableView) {
                var tableView = (UITableView)view;

                if (tableView.DataSource != null) {
                    otherDisposables.Add(tableView.DataSource);
                }
                if (tableView.BackgroundView != null) {
                    associatedViewsToDispose.Add(tableView.BackgroundView);
                }

                tableView.Source = null;
                tableView.Delegate = null;
                tableView.DataSource = null;
                tableView.WeakDelegate = null;
                tableView.WeakDataSource = null;
                associatedViewsToDispose.AddRange(tableView.VisibleCells ?? new UITableViewCell[0]);
            } else if (view is UITableViewCell) {
                var tableViewCell = (UITableViewCell)view;
                disposeView = false;
                disconnectFromSuperView = false;
                if (tableViewCell.ImageView != null) {
                    associatedViewsToDispose.Add(tableViewCell.ImageView);
                }
            } else if (view is UICollectionView) {
                var collectionView = (UICollectionView)view;
                disposeView = false; 
                if (collectionView.DataSource != null) {
                    otherDisposables.Add(collectionView.DataSource);
                }
                if (!collectionView.BackgroundView.IsDisposedOrNull()) {
                    associatedViewsToDispose.Add(collectionView.BackgroundView);
                }
                //associatedViewsToDispose.AddRange(collectionView.VisibleCells ?? new UICollectionViewCell[0]);
                collectionView.Source = null;
                collectionView.Delegate = null;
                collectionView.DataSource = null;
                collectionView.WeakDelegate = null;
                collectionView.WeakDataSource = null;
            } else if (view is UICollectionViewCell) {
                var collectionViewCell = (UICollectionViewCell)view;
                disposeView = false;
                disconnectFromSuperView = false;
                if (collectionViewCell.BackgroundView != null) {
                    associatedViewsToDispose.Add(collectionViewCell.BackgroundView);
                }
            } else if (view is UIWebView) {
                var webView = (UIWebView)view;
                if (webView.IsLoading)
                    webView.StopLoading();
                webView.LoadHtmlString(string.Empty, null); // clear display
                webView.Delegate = null;
                webView.WeakDelegate = null;
            } else if (view is UIImageView) {
                var imageView = (UIImageView)view;
                if (imageView.Image != null) {
                    otherDisposables.Add(imageView.Image);
                    imageView.Image = null;
                }
            } else if (view is UIScrollView) {
                var scrollView = (UIScrollView)view;
                scrollView.UnsetZoomableContentView();
            }

            var gestures = view.GestureRecognizers;
            if (removeGestureRecognizers && gestures != null) {
                foreach(var gr in gestures) {
                    view.RemoveGestureRecognizer(gr);
                    gr.Dispose();
                }
            }

            if (removeLayerAnimations && view.Layer != null) {
                view.Layer.RemoveAllAnimations();
            }

            if (disconnectFromSuperView && view.Superview != null) {
                view.RemoveFromSuperview();
            }

            var constraints = view.Constraints;
            if (constraints != null && constraints.Any() && constraints.All(c => c.Handle != IntPtr.Zero)) {
                view.RemoveConstraints(constraints);
                foreach(var constraint in constraints) {
                    constraint.Dispose();
                }
            }

            foreach(var otherDisposable in otherDisposables) {
                otherDisposable.Dispose();
            }

            foreach(var otherView in associatedViewsToDispose) {
                otherView.DisposeEx();
            }

            var subViews = view.Subviews;
            if (disposeSubviews && subViews != null) {
                subViews.ForEach(DisposeEx);
            }                   

            if (view is ISpecialDisposable) {
                ((ISpecialDisposable)view).SpecialDispose();
            } else if (disposeView) {
                if (view.Handle != IntPtr.Zero)
                    view.Dispose();
            }

            if (enableLogging) {
                SystemLog.Debug("Destroyed {0}", viewDescription);
            }

        } catch (Exception error) {
            SystemLog.Exception(error);
        }
    }

    public static void RemoveAndDisposeChildSubViews(this UIView view) {
        if (view == null)
            return;
        if (view.Handle == IntPtr.Zero)
            return;
        if (view.Subviews == null)
            return;
        view.Subviews.Update(RemoveFromSuperviewAndDispose);
    }

    public static void RemoveFromSuperviewAndDispose(this UIView view) {
        view.RemoveFromSuperview();
        view.DisposeEx();
    }

    public static bool IsDisposedOrNull(this UIView view) {
        if (view == null)
            return true;

        if (view.Handle == IntPtr.Zero)
            return true;;

        return false;
    }

    public interface ISpecialDisposable {
        void SpecialDispose();
    }
share|improve this answer

Couldn't be agree more with the OP that "Garbage Collection is essentially broken in Xamarin".

Here's an example shows why you have to always use a DisposeEx() method as suggested.

The following code leaks memory:

  1. Create a class the inherits UITableViewController

    public class Test3Controller : UITableViewController { public Test3Controller () : base (UITableViewStyle.Grouped) { } }

  2. Call the following code from somewhere

    var controller = new Test3Controller ();

    controller.Dispose ();

    controller = null;

    GC.Collect (GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);

  3. Using Instruments you will see that there are ~ 274 persistent objects with 252 KB never collected.

  4. Only way to fix this is add DisposeEx or similar functionality to the Dispose() function and call Dispose manually to ensure disposing == true.

Summary: Creating a UITableViewController derived class and then disposing/nulling will always cause the heap to grow.

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