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I have very large dataset with dimension of 60K x 4 K. I am trying add every four values in succession in every row column wise. The following is smaller example dataset.

    set.seed(123)
    mat <- matrix (sample(0:1, 48, replace = TRUE), 4)

   [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12]
[1,]    0    1    1    1    0    1    1    0    1     1     0     0
[2,]    1    0    0    1    0    1    1    0    1     0     0     0
[3,]    0    1    1    0    0    1    1    1    0     0     0     0
[4,]    1    1    0    1    1    1    1    1    0     0     0     0

Here is what I am trying to perform:

mat[1,1] + mat[1,2] + mat[1,3] + mat[1,4] = 0 + 1 + 1 + 1 = 3

i.e. add every four values and output.

mat[1,5] + mat[1,6] + mat[1,7] + mat[1,8] = 0 + 1 + 1 + 0 = 2

Keep going to end of matrix (here to 12).

mat[1,9] + mat[1,10] + mat[1,11] + mat[1,12] 

Once first row is done apply the same to second row, like:

mat[2,1] + mat[2,2] + mat[2,3] + mat[2,4] 
mat[2,5] + mat[2,6] + mat[2,7] + mat[2,8]
mat[2,9] + mat[2,10] + mat[2,11] + mat[2,12] 

The result will be nrow x (ncol)/4 matrix.

The expected result will look like:

          col1-col4      col5-8   col9-12
row1        3              2        2
row2        2              2        1
row3        2              3        0
row4        3              4        0

Similarly for row 3 to number of rows in the matrix. How can I efficiently loop this.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

While Matthew's answer is really cool (+1, btw), you can get a much (~100x) faster solution if you avoid apply and use the *Sums functions (in this case colSums), and a bit of vector manipulation trickery:

funSums <- function(mat) {
  t.mat <- t(mat)                                    # rows become columns
  dim(t.mat) <- c(4, length(t.mat) / 4)              # wrap columns every four items (this is what we want to sum)
  t(matrix(colSums(t.mat), nrow=ncol(mat) / 4))      # sum our new 4 element columns, and reconstruct desired output format
}
set.seed(123)
mat <- matrix(sample(0:1, 48, replace = TRUE), 4)
funSums(mat)

Produces desired output:

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    3    2    2
[2,]    2    2    1
[3,]    2    3    0
[4,]    3    4    0

Now, let's make something the real size and compare against the other options:

set.seed(123)
mat <- matrix(sample(0:1, 6e5, replace = TRUE), 4)

funApply <- function(mat) {   # Matthew's Solution
  apply(array(mat, dim=c(4, 4, ncol(mat) / 4)), MARGIN=c(1,3), FUN=sum)
}
funRcpp <- function(mat) {    # David's Solution
  roll_sum(mat, 4, by.column = F)[, seq_len(ncol(mat) - 4 + 1)%%4 == 1]
}
library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(times=10,
  funSums(mat),
  funApply(mat),
  funRcpp(mat)
)

Produces:

Unit: milliseconds
          expr        min         lq     median       uq       max neval
  funSums(mat)   4.035823   4.079707   5.256517   7.5359  42.06529    10
 funApply(mat) 379.124825 399.060015 430.899162 455.7755 471.35960    10
  funRcpp(mat)  18.481184  20.364885  38.595383 106.0277 132.93382    10

And to check:

all.equal(funSums(mat), funApply(mat))
# [1] TRUE
all.equal(funSums(mat), funRcpp(mat))
# [1] TRUE

The key point is that the *Sums functions are fully "vectorized", in as much as all the calculations happen in C. apply still needs to do a bunch of not strictly vectorized (in the primitive C function way) stuff in R, and is slower (but far more flexible).

Specific to this problem, it might be possible to make it 2-3x faster as about half the time is spent on the transpositions, which are only necessary so that the dim changes do what I need for colSums to work.

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thanks, +1 for nice solution and comparison –  SHRram Aug 27 '14 at 22:13

Dividing the matrix up into a 3D array is one way:

apply(array(mat, dim=c(4, 4, 3)), MARGIN=c(1,3), FUN=sum)

#      [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,]    3    2    2
# [2,]    2    2    1
# [3,]    2    3    0
# [4,]    3    4    0
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the excellent solution –  SHRram Aug 27 '14 at 22:14

Here's another approach using the RcppRoll package

library(RcppRoll) # Uses C++/Rcpp
n <- 4 # The summing range
roll_sum(mat, n, by.column = F)[, seq_len(ncol(mat) - n + 1) %% n == 1]

##      [,1] [,2] [,3]
## [1,]    3    2    2
## [2,]    2    2    1
## [3,]    2    3    0
#3 [4,]    3    4    0
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This might be the slowest of all:

set.seed(123)
mat <- matrix (sample(0:1, 48, replace = TRUE), 4)
mat

output <- sapply(seq(4,ncol(mat),4), function(i) { apply(mat,1,function(j){
      sum(j[c(i-3, i-2, i-1, i)], na.rm=TRUE)
})})

output

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    3    2    2
[2,]    2    2    1
[3,]    2    3    0
[4,]    3    4    0

Maybe nested for-loops would be slower, but this answer is pretty close to being nested for-loops.

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