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A friend of mine was asked the following question today at interview for the position of software developer:

Given two string s1 and s2 how will you check if s1 is a rotated version of s2 ?

Example:

If s1 = "stackoverflow" then the following are some of its rotated versions:

"tackoverflows"
"ackoverflowst"
"overflowstack"

where as "stackoverflwo" is not a rotated version.

The answer he gave was:

Take s2 and find the longest prefix that is a sub string of s1, that will give you the point of rotation. Once you find that point, break s2 at that point to get s2a and s2b, then just check if concatenate(s2a,s2b) == s1

It looks like a good solution to me and my friend. But the interviewer thought otherwise. He asked for a simpler solution. Please help me by telling how would you do this in Java/C/C++ ?

Thanks in advance.

share
4  
You don't have to check if concatenate(s2a,s2b) == s1, because you know s2a is equal to the beginning of s1. You can just check if s2b == substring of s1 from rotation_point to end. –  Jason Hall Mar 31 '10 at 14:00
33  
How did this questions and the top answer get so many upvotes!? –  David Johnstone Apr 7 '10 at 3:39
9  
@David: Because it's interesting. –  Cam Apr 11 '10 at 5:53
6  
I would say, very interesting and a elegant, simple answer. –  Guru Apr 13 '10 at 13:19
7  
@David: because it's a question which is not asked before here and also which everyone understands (if one don't understand the question/answer, one would usually for sure not upvote it; a pretty simple question has a wider audience) and also because this is been tagged with both Java and C. It counts :) –  BalusC Apr 19 '10 at 2:10
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26 Answers

up vote 689 down vote accepted

First make sure s1 and s2 are of the same length. Then check to see if s2 is a substring of s1 concatenated with s1:

algorithm checkRotation(string s1, string s2) 
  if( len(s1) != len(s2))
    return false
  if( substring(s2,concat(s1,s1))
    return true
  return false
end

In Java:

boolean isRotation(String s1,String s2) {
    return (s1.length() == s2.length()) && ((s1+s1).indexOf(s2) != -1);
}
share
37  
+1 Nice!....... –  Preet Sangha Mar 31 '10 at 14:02
13  
That's very nice. +1. –  Steve B. Mar 31 '10 at 14:03
11  
don't you mean: substring(s2,concat(s1,s1)? –  Yaneeve Mar 31 '10 at 14:04
49  
I like its elegance, but I had to think for a while to check there weren't any false positives. (I don't think there are.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '10 at 14:55
63  
Nice solution. Stupid interview question. –  noah Mar 31 '10 at 15:18
show 38 more comments

Surely a better answer would be, "Well, I'd ask the stackoverflow community and would probably have at least 4 really good answers within 5 minutes". Brains are good and all, but I'd place a higher value on someone who knows how to work with others to get a solution.

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14  
+1 for sheer cheek. Made my day :-) –  Platinum Azure Apr 6 '10 at 6:03
5  
If they disagreed, you could then link them to this question. –  Cam Apr 11 '10 at 6:29
51  
Whipping out your cellphone during an interview might be considered rude and in the end they'd end up hiring Jon Skeet. –  tstenner Apr 11 '10 at 7:32
2  
Thats actually probably exactly what I would have said –  Chris Dutrow Jun 19 '10 at 4:26
6  
I don't think they will be able to afford Jon Skeet. –  SolutionYogi Oct 11 '10 at 19:06
show 1 more comment

Another python example (based on THE answer):

def isrotation(s1,s2):
     return len(s1)==len(s2) and s1 in 2*s2
share
1  
Interestingly I thought of duplicated s2 rather than s1 too... then realized that the relation was symmetric anyway. –  Matthieu M. Apr 11 '10 at 11:34
1  
If the string could be long, here's a Python version that uses Boyer-Moore to get O(n) running time: def isrotation(s1, s2): return len(s1)==len(s2) and re.compile(re.escape(s1)).search(2*s2) is not None –  Duncan Apr 20 '10 at 13:15
2  
@Duncan: does the in operator not use an O(n) algorithm? –  Ken Bloom May 4 '10 at 14:21
1  
@Duncan: The python string methods uses an optimized Boyer-Moore-Horspool. I wonder if Java has similar optimizations. –  Thomas Ahle Jun 20 '11 at 23:28
1  
@Thomas thanks for pointing that out. I had thought that only regular expressions used Boyer-Moore but I see I was wrong. For Python 2.4 and earlier my answer was correct but since Python 2.5 s1 in s2 is optimised. See effbot.org/zone/stringlib.htm for the description of the algorithm. Google seems to indicate that Java doesn't have fast string searching (see johannburkard.de/software/stringsearch for example) though I doubt it would break anything if they changed it. –  Duncan Jun 21 '11 at 9:18
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As others have submitted quadratic worst-case time complexity solution, I'd add a linear one (based on the KMP Algorithm):

bool is_rotation(const string& str1, const string& str2)
{
  if(str1.size()!=str2.size())
    return false;

  vector<size_t> prefixes(str1.size(), 0);
  for(size_t i=1, j=0; i<str1.size(); i++) {
    while(j>0 && str1[i]!=str1[j])
      j=prefixes[j-1];
    if(str1[i]==str1[j]) j++;
    prefixes[i]=j;
  }

  size_t i=0, j=0;
  for(; i<str2.size(); i++) {
    while(j>0 && str2[i]!=str1[j])
      j=prefixes[j-1];
    if(str2[i]==str1[j]) j++;
  }
  for(i=0; i<str2.size(); i++) {
    if(j>=str1.size()) return true;
    while(j>0 && str2[i]!=str1[j])
      j=prefixes[j-1];
    if(str2[i]==str1[j]) j++;
  }

  return false;
}

working example

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5  
+1 for ideone.com - it looks very interesting! –  MartyIX Apr 17 '10 at 9:35
add comment

EDIT: The accepted answer is clearly more elegant and efficient than this, if you spot it. I left this answer as what I'd do if I hadn't thought of doubling the original string.


I'd just brute-force it. Check the length first, and then try every possible rotation offset. If none of them work out, return false - if any of them does, return true immediately.

There's no particular need to concatenate - just use pointers (C) or indexes (Java) and walk both along, one in each string - starting at the beginning of one string and the current candidate rotation offset in the second string, and wrapping where necessary. Check for character equality at each point in the string. If you get to the end of the first string, you're done.

It would probably be about as easy to concatenate - though probably less efficient, at least in Java.

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8  
+1 - we don't need no elegant solutions that run in 3+ times the most efficient solution. This is C ... micro-optimization is de riguer. –  Stephen C Mar 31 '10 at 14:11
8  
Interviewer: Lotta talk, but I bet this guy can't code. –  Humphrey Bogart Mar 31 '10 at 14:50
8  
@Beau: If anyone wants to think that, they're welcome to ask me for code. If someone just asks me "how I would do something" I usually describe the algorithm rather than leaping to code. –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '10 at 14:57
3  
@Jon - I read Beau's comment as being a joke –  oxbow_lakes Mar 31 '10 at 15:04
37  
@Jon It was a joke! The interviewer doesn't interview Jon Skeet, Jon Skeet interviews him. –  Humphrey Bogart Mar 31 '10 at 16:37
show 8 more comments

Here's one using regex just for fun:

boolean isRotation(String s1, String s2) {
   return (s1.length() == s2.length()) && (s1 + s2).matches("(.*)(.*)\\2\\1");
}

You can make it a bit simpler if you can use a special delimiter character guaranteed not to be in either strings.

boolean isRotation(String s1, String s2) {
   // neither string can contain "="
   return (s1 + "=" + s2).matches("(.*)(.*)=\\2\\1");
}

You can also use lookbehind with finite repetition instead:

boolean isRotation(String s1, String s2) {
   return (s1 + s2).matches(
      String.format("(.*)(.*)(?<=^.{%d})\\2\\1", s1.length())
   );
}
share
6  
+1 for being a regex master. –  Chris Thornton Apr 1 '10 at 12:11
    
-1 For putting the words "regex" and "fun" in the same statement, without modifying "fun" with "not" (only joking, I didn't down vote) –  Binary Worrier May 4 '10 at 14:28
    
-3 for implying that regexes aren't fun. –  manlycode Sep 2 '10 at 23:30
    
can any body plz explain how this regex "(.*)(.*)=\\2\\1" worked! –  mawia Nov 12 '10 at 17:33
add comment

Whoa, whoa... why is everyone so thrilled with an O(n^2) answer? I'm positive that we can do better here. THE answer above includes an O(n) operation in an O(n) loop (the substring/indexOf call). Even with a more efficient search algorithm; say Boyer-Moore or KMP, the worst-case is still O(n^2) with duplicates.

A O(n) randomized answer is straightforward; take a hash (like a Rabin fingerprint) that supports an O(1) sliding window; hash string 1, then hash string 2, and proceed to move the window for hash 1 around the string and see if the hash functions collide.

If we imagine the worst case being something like "scanning two strands of DNA", then the probability of collisions goes up, and this probably degenerates to something like O(n^(1+e)) or something (just guessing here).

Finally, there's a deterministic O(nlogn) solution that has a very big constant outside. Basically, the idea is to take a convolution of the two strings. The max value of the convolution will be the rotation difference (if they are rotated); an O(n) check confirms. The nice thing is that if there are two equal max values, then they are both also valid solutions. You can do the convolution with two FFT's and a dot product, and an iFFT, so nlogn + nlogn + n + nlogn + n == O(nlogn).

Since you can't pad with zeroes, and you can't guarantee that the strings are of 2^n length, the FFTs won't be the fast ones; they'll be the slow ones, still O(nlogn) but a much bigger constant than the CT algorithm.

All that said, I'm absolutely, 100% positive that there is a deterministic O(n) solution here, but darned if I can find it.

share
    
KMP on the concatenated-with-itself string (either physically or virtually with a %stringsize) is guaranteed to be linear time. –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 23 '10 at 22:07
    
+1 for Rabin-Karp. Unlike KMP, it uses constant space, and it's simpler to implement. (It's also the first answer I thought of, in seconds, making it hard to see the 'right' answer, because this one's right there and it's sweet.) Your convolution idea reminds me of Shor's algorithm -- I wonder if there's a sublinear quantum solution -- but that's getting silly now, right? –  Darius Bacon May 16 '10 at 7:26
1  
RK does not give a deterministic O(n) solution, and KMP is O(n) in space which might be undesirable. Look up Two Way or SMOA substring searching which are both O(n) in time and O(1) in space. By the way, glibc strstr uses Two Way, but if you actually concatenate strings to use it as opposed to using %len you're back to O(n) in space. :-) –  R.. Jun 28 '10 at 20:57
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Fist, make sure the 2 strings have the same length. Then in C, you can do this with a simple pointer iteration.


int is_rotation(char* s1, char* s2)
{
  char *tmp1;
  char *tmp2;
  char *ref2;

  assert(s1 && s2);
  if ((s1 == s2) || (strcmp(s1, s2) == 0))
    return (1);
  if (strlen(s1) != strlen(s2))
    return (0);

  while (*s2)
    {
      tmp1 = s1;
      if ((ref2 = strchr(s2, *s1)) == NULL)
        return (0);
      tmp2 = ref2;
      while (*tmp1 && (*tmp1 == *tmp2))
        {
          ++tmp1;
          ++tmp2;
          if (*tmp2 == '\0')
            tmp2 = s2;
        }
      if (*tmp1 == '\0')
        return (1);
      else
        ++s2;
    }
  return (0);
}
share
19  
Ah, C. Why do something in half the time and code when you can do it in C! –  Humphrey Bogart Mar 31 '10 at 14:21
11  
+1 It's very well written C. And to be fair, the question is tagged 'c'. –  Nick Moore Mar 31 '10 at 14:30
5  
In this code you have walked the strings at least 2 if not 3 times (in strlen and strcmp). You can save yourself this check and you can keep that logic in your loop. As you are looping, if one string character count is different than the other, exit the loop. You will know the lengths, as you know the start and you know when you've hit the null terminator. –  Nasko Mar 31 '10 at 14:54
12  
@Beau Martinez - because sometimes execution time is more important than development time :-) –  phkahler Mar 31 '10 at 16:15
2  
@phkahler - The thing is it might well be slower. The built in index functions in the other languages typically use a fast string search algorithm like Boyer-Moore, Rabin-Karp or Knuth-Morris-Pratt. It is too naive just reinvent everything in C, and assume it to be faster. –  Thomas Ahle Jun 3 '10 at 10:32
show 1 more comment

Here is an O(n) and in place alghoritm. It uses < operator for the elements of the strings. It's not mine of course. I took it from here (The site is in polish. I stumbled upon it once in the past and I couldn't find something like that now in English, so I show what I have :)).

bool equiv_cyc(const string &u, const string &v)
{
    int n = u.length(), i = -1, j = -1, k;
    if (n != v.length()) return false;

    while( i<n-1 && j<n-1 )
    {
        k = 1;
        while(k<=n && u[(i+k)%n]==v[(j+k)%n]) k++;
        if (k>n) return true;
        if (u[(i+k)%n] > v[(j+k)%n]) i += k; else j += k;
    }
    return false;
}
share
    
+1, interesting link. –  codaddict Aug 20 '10 at 11:18
    
+1... O(n) is just sooooo much more profound from a comp-sci point of view than any non O(n) solution :) –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 20 '10 at 23:14
4  
+1 for a solution that's optimal in time and near-optimal in code-size (both binary and LoC). This answer would be even better with an explanation. –  R.. Jan 2 '11 at 17:08
    
Utterly baffling. We need an explanation! –  j_random_hacker Oct 2 '11 at 17:08
add comment

I guess its better to do this in Java:

boolean isRotation(String s1,String s2) {
    return (s1.length() == s2.length()) && (s1+s1).contains(s2);
}

In Perl I would do:

sub isRotation {
 my($string1,$string2) = @_;
 return length($string1) == length($string2) && ($string1.$string1)=~/$string2/;
}

or even better using the index function instead of the regex:

sub isRotation {
 my($string1,$string2) = @_;
 return length($string1) == length($string2) && index($string2,$string1.$string1) != -1;
}
share
1  
You forgot \Q in /\Q$string2/. –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 23 '10 at 21:56
    
Why would I use it ? –  Zacky112 Apr 27 '10 at 12:13
3  
\Q quotes any special characters in $string2. Without it, . would be considered to be a rotation of any 1-character string. –  jackrabbit Apr 30 '10 at 7:08
add comment

Take each character as an amplitude and perform a discrete Fourier transform on them. If they differ only by rotation, the frequency spectra will be the same to within rounding error. Of course this is inefficient unless the length is a power of 2 so you can do an FFT :-)

share
    
We've used this as an interesting coding exercise, I'm not sure we'd be able to evaluate that ;). –  jayshao Mar 6 '11 at 18:27
    
FFT abused :) +1 from me –  Aamir Feb 13 '12 at 12:10
add comment

Not sure if this is the most efficient method, but it might be relatively interesting: the the Burrows-Wheeler transform. According to the WP article, all rotations of the input yield the same output. For applications such as compression this isn't desirable, so the original rotation is indicated (e.g. by an index; see the article). But for simple rotation-independent comparison, it sounds ideal. Of course, it's not necessarily ideally efficient!

share
    
Since the Burrows-Wheeler transform involves computing all rotations of the string, it's surely not going to be optimal.. :-) –  R.. Jun 28 '10 at 20:58
    
+1 for the interesting link. –  Xiè Jìléi Mar 9 '11 at 2:44
add comment

Nobody offered a modulo approach yet, so here's one:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
        IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ztackoverflow"));
    Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
        IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ackoverflowst"));
    Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
        IsRotation("stackoverflow", "overflowstack"));
    Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
        IsRotation("stackoverflow", "stackoverflwo"));
    Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
        IsRotation("stackoverflow", "tackoverflwos"));
    Console.ReadLine();
}

public static bool IsRotation(string a, string b)
{
    Console.WriteLine("\nA: {0} B: {1}", a, b);

    if (b.Length != a.Length)
        return false;

    int ndx = a.IndexOf(b[0]);
    bool isRotation = true;
    Console.WriteLine("Ndx: {0}", ndx);
    if (ndx == -1) return false;
    for (int i = 0; i < b.Length; ++i)
    {
        int rotatedNdx = (i + ndx) % b.Length;
        char rotatedA = a[rotatedNdx];

        Console.WriteLine( "B: {0} A[{1}]: {2}", b[i], rotatedNdx, rotatedA );

        if (b[i] != rotatedA)
        {
            isRotation = false;
            // break; uncomment this when you remove the Console.WriteLine
        }
    }
    return isRotation;
}

Output:

A: stackoverflow B: ztackoverflow
Ndx: -1
Rotation : False

A: stackoverflow B: ackoverflowst
Ndx: 2
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: o A[11]: o
B: w A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
Rotation : True

A: stackoverflow B: overflowstack
Ndx: 5
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: o A[11]: o
B: w A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
Rotation : True

A: stackoverflow B: stackoverflwo
Ndx: 0
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: w A[11]: o
B: o A[12]: w
Rotation : False

A: stackoverflow B: tackoverflwos
Ndx: 1
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: w A[11]: o
B: o A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
Rotation : False

[EDIT: 2010-04-12]

piotr noticed the flaw in my code above. It errors when the first character in the string occurs twice or more. For example, stackoverflow tested against owstackoverflow resulted in false, when it should be true.

Thanks piotr for spotting the error.

Now, here's the corrected code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace TestRotate
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ztackoverflow"));
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ackoverflowst"));
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "overflowstack"));
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "stackoverflwo"));
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "tackoverflwos"));

            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "owstackoverfl"));

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static bool IsRotation(string a, string b)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\nA: {0} B: {1}", a, b);

            if (b.Length != a.Length)
                return false;

            if (a.IndexOf(b[0]) == -1 )
                return false;

            foreach (int ndx in IndexList(a, b[0]))
            {
                bool isRotation = true;

                Console.WriteLine("Ndx: {0}", ndx);

                for (int i = 0; i < b.Length; ++i)
                {
                    int rotatedNdx = (i + ndx) % b.Length;
                    char rotatedA = a[rotatedNdx];

                    Console.WriteLine("B: {0} A[{1}]: {2}", b[i], rotatedNdx, rotatedA);

                    if (b[i] != rotatedA)
                    {
                        isRotation = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if (isRotation)
                    return true;
            }
            return false;
        }

        public static IEnumerable<int> IndexList(string src, char c)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < src.Length; ++i)
                if (src[i] == c)
                    yield return i;
        }

    }//class Program
}//namespace TestRotate

Here's the output:

A: stackoverflow B: ztackoverflow
Rotation : False

A: stackoverflow B: ackoverflowst
Ndx: 2
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: o A[11]: o
B: w A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
Rotation : True

A: stackoverflow B: overflowstack
Ndx: 5
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: o A[11]: o
B: w A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
Rotation : True

A: stackoverflow B: stackoverflwo
Ndx: 0
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: w A[11]: o
Rotation : False

A: stackoverflow B: tackoverflwos
Ndx: 1
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
B: w A[11]: o
Rotation : False

A: stackoverflow B: owstackoverfl
Ndx: 5
B: o A[5]: o
B: w A[6]: v
Ndx: 11
B: o A[11]: o
B: w A[12]: w
B: s A[0]: s
B: t A[1]: t
B: a A[2]: a
B: c A[3]: c
B: k A[4]: k
B: o A[5]: o
B: v A[6]: v
B: e A[7]: e
B: r A[8]: r
B: f A[9]: f
B: l A[10]: l
Rotation : True

Here's the lambda approach:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace IsRotation
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ztackoverflow"));

            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "ackoverflowst"));

            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "overflowstack"));
            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "stackoverflwo"));

            Console.WriteLine("Rotation : {0}",
                IsRotation("stackoverflow", "owstackoverfl"));

            string strToTestFrom = "stackoverflow";
            foreach(string s in StringRotations(strToTestFrom))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("is {0} rotation of {1} ? {2}",
                    s, strToTestFrom,
                    IsRotation(strToTestFrom, s) );
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static IEnumerable<string> StringRotations(string src)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < src.Length; ++i)
            {
                var sb = new StringBuilder();
                for (int x = 0; x < src.Length; ++x)
                    sb.Append(src[(i + x) % src.Length]);

                yield return sb.ToString();
            }
        }

        public static bool IsRotation(string a, string b)
        {
            if (b.Length != a.Length || a.IndexOf(b[0]) < 0 ) return false;
            foreach(int ndx in IndexList(a, b[0]))
            {
                int i = ndx;
                if (b.ToCharArray().All(x => x == a[i++ % a.Length]))
                    return true;
            }
            return false;
        }

        public static IEnumerable<int> IndexList(string src, char c)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < src.Length; ++i)
                if (src[i] == c)
                    yield return i;
        }

    }//class Program

}//namespace IsRotation

Here's the lambda approach output:

Rotation : False
Rotation : True
Rotation : True
Rotation : False
Rotation : True
is stackoverflow rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is tackoverflows rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is ackoverflowst rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is ckoverflowsta rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is koverflowstac rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is overflowstack rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is verflowstacko rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is erflowstackov rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is rflowstackove rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is flowstackover rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is lowstackoverf rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is owstackoverfl rotation of stackoverflow ? True
is wstackoverflo rotation of stackoverflow ? True
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I don't think your answer is correct since int ndx = a.IndexOf(b[0]); will work only if there are not other elements with the same value of b[0] in the string. –  piotr Apr 12 '10 at 9:28
    
thanks for noticing the flaw. corrected it now –  Michael Buen Apr 12 '10 at 12:43
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As no one has given a C++ solution. here it it:

bool isRotation(string s1,string s2) {

  string temp = s1;
  temp += s1;
  return (s1.length() == s2.length()) && (temp.find(s2) != string::npos);
}
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Couple points: you're doing the relatively expensive string concatenation even if the lengths don't match; you could pass s2 by const reference. –  Tony D Jan 21 '11 at 7:04
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Opera's simple pointer rotation trick works, but it is extremely inefficient in the worst case in running time. Simply imagine a string with many long repetitive runs of characters, ie:

S1 = HELLOHELLOHELLO1HELLOHELLOHELLO2

S2 = HELLOHELLOHELLO2HELLOHELLOHELLO1

The "loop until there's a mismatch, then increment by one and try again" is a horrible approach, computationally.

To prove that you can do the concatenation approach in plain C without too much effort, here is my solution:

  int isRotation(const char* s1, const char* s2) {
        assert(s1 && s2);

        size_t s1Len = strlen(s1);

        if (s1Len != strlen(s2)) return 0;

        char s1SelfConcat[ 2 * s1Len + 1 ];

        sprintf(s1SelfConcat, "%s%s", s1, s1);   

        return (strstr(s1SelfConcat, s2) ? 1 : 0);
}

This is linear in running time, at the expense of O(n) memory usage in overhead.

(Note that the implementation of strstr() is platform-specific, but if particularly brain-dead, can always be replaced with a faster alternative such as the Boyer-Moore algorithm)

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1  
Do you know of any platform that has strstr() in O(n+m)? Also, if the standard (or anything else) doesn't guarantee you a linear running time of strstr(), you cannot assert that the whole algorithm has linear time compexity. –  jpalecek Apr 1 '10 at 22:44
    
Which is why I said that it can be replaced by the Boyer-Moore algorithm, making it run in linear time. –  RarrRarrRarr Apr 1 '10 at 22:56
    
There are a couple of potential problems with your method of allocating s1SelfConcat: it's only since C9x that C allows variable array sizes (although GCC has allowed it much longer), and you will run into trouble allocating large strings on the stack. Yosef Kreinin wrote a very amusing blog post about this problem. Also, your solution is still quadratic time with Boyer-Moore; you want KMP. –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 23 '10 at 22:03
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C#:

s1 == null && s2 == null || s1.Length == s2.Length && (s1 + s1).Contains(s2)
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I like THE answer that checks if s2 is a substring of s1 concatenated with s1.

I wanted to add an optimization that doesn't lose its elegance.

Instead of concatenating the strings you can use a join view (I don't know for other language, but for C++ Boost.Range provide such kind of views).

As the check if a string is a substring of another has linear average complexity (Worst-case complexity is quadratic), this optimization should improve the speed by a factor of 2 in average.

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A pure Java answer (sans null checks)

private boolean isRotation(String s1,String s2){
    if(s1.length() != s2.length()) return false;
    for(int i=0; i < s1.length()-1; i++){
        s1 = new StringBuilder(s1.substring(1)).append(s1.charAt(0)).toString();
        //--or-- s1 = s1.substring(1) + s1.charAt(0)
        if(s1.equals(s2)) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
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And now for something completely different.

If you want a really fast answer in some constrained context when strings are not rotation of one another

  • compute some character based checksum (like xoring all characters) on both strings. If signatures differ strings are not rotations of one another.

Agreed, it can fail, but it is very fast to say if strings don't match and if they match you can still use another algorithm like string concatenation to check.

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Another Ruby solution based on the answer:

def rotation?(a, b); a.size == b.size and (b*2)[a]; end
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It's very easy to write in PHP using strlen and strpos functions:

function isRotation($string1, $string2) {
    return strlen($string1) == strlen($string2) && (($string1.$string1).strpos($string2) != -1);
}

I don't know what strpos uses internally, but if it uses KMP this will be linear in time.

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Reverse one of the strings. Take the FFT of both (treating them as simple sequences of integers). Multiply the results together point-wise. Transform back using inverse FFT. The result will have a single peak if the strings are rotations of each other -- the position of the peak will indicate by how much they are rotated with respect to each other.

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Why not something like this?


//is q a rotation of p?
bool isRotation(string p, string q) {
    string table = q + q;    
    return table.IndexOf(p) != -1;
}

Of course, you could write your own IndexOf() function; I'm not sure if .NET uses a naive way or a faster way.

Naive:


int IndexOf(string s) {
    for (int i = 0; i < this.Length - s.Length; i++)
        if (this.Substring(i, s.Length) == s) return i;
    return -1;
}

Faster:


int IndexOf(string s) {
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < this.Length; i++) {
        if (this[i] == s[count])
            count++;
        else
            count = 0;
        if (count == s.Length)
            return i - s.Length;
    }
    return -1;
}

Edit: I might have some off-by-one problems; don't feel like checking. ;)

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I'd do this in Perl:

sub isRotation { 
     return length $_[0] == length $_[1] and index($_[1],$_[0],$_[0]) != -1; 
}
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int rotation(char *s1,char *s2)
{
    int i,j,k,p=0,n;
    n=strlen(s1);
    k=strlen(s2);
    if (n!=k)
        return 0;
    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        if (s1[0]==s2[i])
        {
            for (j=i,k=0;k<n;k++,j++)
            {
                if (s1[k]==s2[j])
                    p++;
                if (j==n-1)
                    j=0;
            }
        }
    }
    if (n==p+1)
      return 1;
    else
      return 0;
}
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Join string1 with string2 and use KMP algorithm to check whether string2 is present in newly formed string. Because time complexity of KMP is lesser than substr.

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