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Possible duplicate: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2548835/renaming-and-moving-files-in-bash-or-perl/2548919#2548919

I'm kinda newbie to perl and looking for a script that will handle file moving.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
$filename = 'DUMBFILE';
$destination = '/some/location/';
if (-e $destination + $filename) {
  print "File Exists ! Renaming ..";
  move ('/tmp/' + $filename, $destination + $filename + '.1');
} else {
  move ('/tmp/' + $filename, $destination + $filename);
}

I'm able to rename it to 1, but i want to be renamed incrementally, like if file.1 exists, rename to .2, and .3 if .2 exists.

EDIT : and keep the extension the same; like file.exe becomes file.exe.1, file.exe.2 etc.

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5  
String concatenation in Perl is achieved using . not +. You are better off using Path::Class or File::Spec for forming paths from individual components. Finally, the logic of your script is not clear. You seem to be overwriting /some/location/DUMBFILE.1 with /tmp/DUMBFILE. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 31 '10 at 14:13
    
It's a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2548835/… . (ignore "bash" in the subject - the OP said perl was fine) - the accepted answer provides the script for moving –  DVK Mar 31 '10 at 17:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Spec::Functions qw'catfile';
use File::Copy qw'move';
use autodie    qw'move';

my $filename    = 'DUMBFILE';
my $origin      = '/tmp';
my $destination = '/some/location';

my $path = catfile $destination, $filename;
{
  my $counter;
  while( -e $path ){
    $counter++;
    $path = catfile $destination, "$filename.$counter";
  }
}

move( catfile( $origin, $filename ), $path );
share|improve this answer
    
Same with extension keeping ? (see my other comment) –  Disco Mar 31 '10 at 15:14
    
@Disco, perhaps you should edit your question. –  Brad Gilbert Mar 31 '10 at 15:31
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/2548835/… has the answer with extension keeping –  DVK Mar 31 '10 at 17:08

You need to concatenation . instead of +:

if (-e $destination . $filename) {

Or even better. You can use File::Spec module:

use File::Spec;
...
if (-e File::Spec->join($destination, $filename)) {

And please use strict;

To move file you can use File::Copy module:

use File::Copy;
...
move($from, $to);
share|improve this answer
    
This still doesn't address the core part of the question - the incremental counter appended to the name. –  Jefromi Mar 31 '10 at 14:24

Probably what you want to do is something like:

use File::Copy;

sub construct_filename {
    my ($dir, $name, $counter) = @_;
    if ($name =~ /^(.*)\.(.*)$/) {
        return "$dir/$1.$counter.$2";
    } else {
        return "$dir/$name.$counter";
    }
}

if (-e "$destination$filename") {
    $counter = 1;
    while (-e construct_filename($destination,$filename,$counter)) {
        $counter++;
    }
    move("/tmp/$filename", construct_filename($destination,$filename,$counter));
} else {
    move("/tmp/$filename", "$destination$filename");
}

Also, the string concatenation operator in perl is ., not +. What you wrote isn't going to work at all. In this case you can just use double-quoted string interpolation though, and not bother with concatenation.

And for what it's worth, an easier convention is for directories to never contain trailing slashes, and to always use them when you construct filenames (e.g. "$destination/$filename"). As others have pointed out, the most robust way to do the path-building is with File::Spec. From what I could tell, though, the part you were really looking for was how to do the incremental naming; so I've given a clear and short version of that. Upgrade to File::Spec as you see fit!

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3  
There's a race condition between checking for $filename.$counter and using it. This will probably never be an issue but is worth knowing about. –  Josh Kelley Mar 31 '10 at 14:19
    
@Josh Kelley: Thanks, I meant to mention that but forgot by the time I was done. –  Jefromi Mar 31 '10 at 14:23
    
Thanks, it's working ... but now i see that i don't want to rename the file to .1 but keep the extension instead. Like having 'file.exe' rename to 'file.1.exe' 'file.2.exe' etc ... –  Disco Mar 31 '10 at 15:09
    
@Disco: You should be able to pop off the extension using File::Basename. If you put that together with other answers, you should have what you need: a while loop to keep checking for existing filenames, File::Spec to build names out of pieces of a path, and . to concatenate the extension onto the end. –  Telemachus Mar 31 '10 at 15:33
    
@Telemachus: Doesn't File::Basename require a list of suffixes? Or can those be patterns... I forget. @Disco: I added a simple way to do that. (As always, you can reimplement using File::Spec; I'm just trying to keep this short) Of course, I really think you should probably be going off and giving it a shot on your own before asking us to write more for you... –  Jefromi Mar 31 '10 at 15:41
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
$filename = 'DUMBFILE';
$destination = '/some/location/';
$filepath=$destination.$filename;
if (-e $filepath) {
  print "File Exists ! Renaming ..";
  $counter++;
  rename('/tmp/'.$filename.$filepath.$counter);
} else {
  move ('/tmp/'.$filename.$filepath);
}
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