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This is my template matrix class:

template<typename T>
class Matrix
{
public:
....
Matrix<T> operator / (const T &num);
}

However, in my Pixel class, I didn't define the Pixel/Pixel operator at all!

Why in this case, the compiler still compiles?

Pixel class

#ifndef MYRGB_H
#define MYRGB_H

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Pixel
{
public:
    // Constructors
    Pixel();
    Pixel(const int r, const int g, const int b);
    Pixel(const Pixel &value);
    ~Pixel();

    // Assignment operator
    const Pixel& operator = (const Pixel &value);

    // Logical operator
    bool operator == (const Pixel &value);
    bool operator != (const Pixel &value);

    // Calculation operators
    Pixel operator + (const Pixel &value);
    Pixel operator - (const Pixel &value);
    Pixel operator * (const Pixel &value);
    Pixel operator * (const int &num);
    Pixel operator / (const int &num);

    // IO-stream operators
    friend istream &operator >> (istream& input, Pixel &value);
    friend ostream &operator << (ostream& output, const Pixel &value);

private:
    int red;
    int green;
    int blue;
};

#endif
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1  
Please include the compiler error you're seeing. You also mention a Pixel class that you don't show any code for. It looks like you're defining a '/' operator on your matrix class, one which takes a T element on the right side. You don't show the body of that method, so it's doubly hard to know why you'd expect a compiler error. More info, please. –  Will Robinson Mar 31 '10 at 16:06
    
@Neil added the Pixel class. Thanks. –  Yin Zhu Mar 31 '10 at 16:06
5  
You should never be using namespace std in a header. –  sbi Mar 31 '10 at 16:12
    
By the way, I think the assignment operator typically returns a non-const reference. –  tony Mar 31 '10 at 16:13
    
You only show class declarations. I have no idea why you think they shouldn't compile. –  sbi Mar 31 '10 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

C++ templates are instantiated at the point you use them, and this happens for the Matrix<T>::operator/(const T&), too. This means the compiler will allow Matrix<Pixel>, unless you ever invoke the division operator.

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I would rather say that it would not allow Matrix<Pixel>::operator/ to be called, because all source files that reference Matrix<Pixel> without ever mentioning the operator/ will continue to compile. –  Matthieu M. Mar 31 '10 at 17:17

1) You didn't provide body of Matrix operator, so it is possible that Pixel/Pixel operator isn't needed.

2) Afaik, template methods do not generate compile errors unless you call them somewhere in your code. NO idea if this is standard or not, but some versions of MSVC behave this way. Do

Matrix m;
Pixel p;
m = m/p

somewhere in your code, and see what happens.

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