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I would like to delete the first occurrence of an entry in abibtex file based on its id. For example, let's say we have this file:

@inproceedings{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@inproceedings{id2,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@misc{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

And I would like to delete the first entry containing id1, so the output I would like is:

@inproceedings{id2,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@misc{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

I want an automated way to do this using sed preferably. Until now I have this:

sed '/^@.*{id1/, /}/d' input_file

But this deletes all the occurrences in the file. Can you help me to find a way to just delete the first one?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 'x;/./{x;b};x;/^@.*{id1/,/}/{/}/h;d}' file

Set a flag in the hold space once the first occurance has been deleted and if the flag is set ignore further lines to the end of the file.

There are two registers that can be utilized when writing sed commands. Sed will place the current line (minus the newline) in the Pattern Space (PS) and a second register is call the Hold Space (HS). x swaps the PS for the HS and h copies the PS to the HS. The sed one line script swaps the PS for the HS, checks the HS for any character /./ and if this condition is true reswaps the HS for the PS and bails out. If the condition is not true the HS is reswapped for the PS and further commands are executed. A range condition is looked for /^@.*{id1/,/}/ which is all lines inclusive between two strings and if found these lines are deleted but first if the current line is found to be the end condition this line is copied to the the HS. /}/h. Now subsequent lines will be ignored to the end of the file.

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Cool! It works, but I don't understand what it does. Can you give me more info on how it works? I will also try to search for details in Google.. Thank you! –  Thanasis Petsas Aug 28 at 16:27
1  
@ThanasisPetsas see edit. –  potong Aug 28 at 16:56
    
Thank you very much for the description! I was not aware of these register.. They seem very helpful! –  Thanasis Petsas Aug 29 at 11:08

Using awk you can do this with custom RS (record separator):

awk -v RS= -v ORS='\n\n' '!/@inproceedings{id1/' f
@inproceedings{id2,
  author = "",
    title = "",
      ...
}

@misc{id1,
  author = "",
    title = "",
      ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would search for "id1" rather than assuming it's the first one. –  glenn jackman Aug 28 at 13:47
    
Yes I can search but I though OP just wanted to remove first entry. Let me add that in my answer. –  anubhava Aug 28 at 13:48
    
Right! I would like to delete something, based on the id as I have mentioned in the question. –  Thanasis Petsas Aug 28 at 13:48
    
But id1 is there in 3rd entry also. Can we delete based on @inproceedings{id1 text? –  anubhava Aug 28 at 13:49
    
@ThanasisPetsas: Is this close to what you needed or need more filtering in awk condition? –  anubhava Aug 28 at 13:56
sed '/^@inproceedings{id1,/,/}/ d' YourFile

delete each line of the section (/start/,/end/ action)

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But if both the entries with id1 have the attribute inproceedings will be erased both of them, but I would like to delete only the first one.. –  Thanasis Petsas Aug 28 at 13:55
    
Exact. Adapt your sample, i will try to adapt the code. I just see Potong already add a better code including this remark :-) –  NeronLeVelu Aug 29 at 5:45

sed is an excellent tool for simple substitutions on a single line but for all other text manipulation you should use awk.

$ awk -v type="inproceedings" -v id="id1" -v RS= -v ORS='\n\n' -F'[@{,]' '!($2 == type && $3 == id)' file
@inproceedings{id2,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@misc{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

.

$ awk -v type="inproceedings" -v id="id2" -v RS= -v ORS='\n\n' -F'[@{,]' '!($2 == type && $3 == id)' file
@inproceedings{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@misc{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

.

$ awk -v type="misc" -v id="id1" -v RS= -v ORS='\n\n' -F'[@{,]' '!($2 == type && $3 == id)' file
@inproceedings{id1,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

@inproceedings{id2,
  author = "",
  title = "",
  ...
}

and if you want to select the blocks that match instead of the ones that don't match, just get rid of the ! at the start of the condition.

All of the sed language constructs to manipulate multi-line blocks of code (i.e. everything except s, g, and p with -n) became obsolete in the mid-1970s when awk was invented so just ignore them all as you'll never need them. Get the book Effective Awk Programming, Third Edition by Arnold Robbins and spend you're time on that instead.

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1  
Thank you very much! This solution is great too. But as I asked for a preferable solution based on sed I accepted the answer of potong. Nevertheless, awk is an amazing command/language! Thank you for the book suggestion too. –  Thanasis Petsas Aug 29 at 11:11
    
You're welcome. It's perfectly reasonable to accept a sed-based solution since you asked for one. Don't actually use it of course as that will lead to the oft-heard sed mantra Cool! It works, but I don't understand what it does and just TRY to modify it to do even the simplest thing differently or additionally, e.g. print a message to stderr when author is missing from a block :-). –  Ed Morton Aug 29 at 12:03

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