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Here is my problem:

Create a constructor for a telephone number given a string in the form xxx-xxx-xxxx or xxx-xxxx for a local number. Throw an exception if the format is not valid.

So I was thinking to validate it using a regular expression, but I don't know if I'm doing it correctly. Also what kind of exception would I have to throw? Do I need to create my own exception?

    public TelephoneNumber(String aString){
        if(isPhoneNumberValid(aString)==true){
            StringTokenizer tokens = new StringTokenizer("-");
            if(tokens.countTokens()==3){
                areaCode = Integer.parseInt(tokens.nextToken());
                exchangeCode = Integer.parseInt(tokens.nextToken());
                number = Integer.parseInt(tokens.nextToken());
            }
            else if(tokens.countTokens()==2){
                exchangeCode = Integer.parseInt(tokens.nextToken());
                number = Integer.parseInt(tokens.nextToken());
            }
            else{
                //throw an excemption here
            }
        }

    }


 public static boolean isPhoneNumberValid(String phoneNumber){
     boolean isValid = false;

     //Initialize reg ex for phone number.
    String expression = "(\\d{3})(\\[-])(\\d{4})$";
    CharSequence inputStr = phoneNumber;
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(expression);
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(inputStr);
    if(matcher.matches()){
        isValid = true;
     }
        return isValid;
    }

Hi sorry, yes this is homework. For this assignments the only valid format are xxx-xxx-xxxx and xxx-xxxx, all other formats (xxx)xxx-xxxx or xxxxxxxxxx are invalid in this case.

I would like to know if my regular expression is correct

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3  
is this homework? should be tagged as such if so... –  Brabster Mar 31 '10 at 17:46
    
Obvious question: Are you sure that your phone number format catches any variety of phone number that your users might want to enter? Nothing is more frustrating than a half-smart system that refuses to accept perfectly valid data. (Oh, and if this is only homework - never mind.) –  Tomalak Mar 31 '10 at 17:48
    
Completely agree with @Tomalak. If this is a production system, the correct answer is to strip out any non-numeric characters and validate the resulting number. –  Michael Myers Mar 31 '10 at 17:51
    
StringTokenizer is BAD practice. –  Jarrod Roberson Mar 31 '10 at 18:29
    
"StringTokenizer is BAD practice." @fuzzy lollipop, it would be helpful to provide an explanation why this is bad practice, as in @haldean's answer below. –  MikeG Aug 5 '10 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

So I was thinking to validate it using a regular expression, but I don't know if I'm doing it correctly.

It indeed looks overcomplicated. Also, matching xxx-xxx-xxxx or xxx-xxxx where x is a digit can be done better with "(\\d{3}-){1,2}\\d{4}". To learn more about regex I recommend to go through http://regular-expressions.info.

Also what kind of exception would I have to throw? Do I need to create my own exception?

A ValidatorException seems straight forward.

public static void isPhoneNumberValid(String phoneNumber) throws ValidatorException {
    if (!phoneNumber.matches(regex)) {
        throws ValidatorException("Invalid phone number");
    }
}

If you don't want to create one yourself for some reasons, then I'd probably pick IllegalArgumentException, but still, I don't recommend that.

That said, this validation of course doesn't cover international and/or external telephone numbers. Unless this is really homework, I'd suggest to rethink the validation.

share|improve this answer

You could match those patterns pretty easily as suggested by BalusC.

As a side note, StringTokenizer has been deprecated. From JavaDoc:

StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead.

An easier way to split your string into the appropriate segments would be:

String phoneParts[] = phoneNumber.split("-");
share|improve this answer
^(([(]?(\d{2,4})[)]?)|(\d{2,4})|([+1-9]+\d{1,2}))?[-\s]?(\d{2,3})?[-\s]?((\d{7,8})|(\d{3,4}[-\s]\d{3,4}))$

matches: (0060)123-12345678, (0060)12312345678, (832)123-1234567, (006)03-12345678,

(006)03-12345678, 00603-12345678, 0060312345678

0000-123-12345678, 0000-12-12345678, 0000-1212345678 ... etc.

1234-5678, 01-123-4567

Can replace '-' with SPACE i.e (0080) 123 12345678

Also matches +82-123-1234567, +82 123 1234567, +800 01 12345678 ... etc.

More for house-hold/private number. Not for 1-800-000-0000 type of number

*Tested with Regex tester http://regexpal.com/

share|improve this answer
    
Please read the question instead of only the title. This is not exactly what the OP is asking. "For this assignments the only valid format are xxx-xxx-xxxx and xxx-xxxx, all other formats (xxx)xxx-xxxx or xxxxxxxxxx are invalid in this case." –  BalusC Jun 28 '13 at 10:14
    
As this is the second time you're doing, I just want to inform that Stack Overflow is a Question & Answer site. It is not a discussion forum where everyone looking for the exact answer has to wade through a mess of repeated/overgeneralized answers in order to find the exact answer one is looking for. –  BalusC Jun 28 '13 at 10:20
    
FYI, a lot of developers are looking for 'similar' but not exact answers. I'm just trying to contribute back to the community so they don have to wade through other webs to look for what they want. Like my case, I just want to have a comprehensive validation regex & this page inspired me. Despite not directly answered, my post at least fit to the context. It's hard to look for someone who ask the same question U wish. –  peterong Jun 28 '13 at 10:43
String nu="77366h1253";
    if(nu.length()==10){
        System.out.println("condition ok");
        try{
            long numb=Long.parseLong(nu);
            System.out.println(numb);
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("inside catch");
            }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Did you manage to read the question? –  user unknown Apr 4 '12 at 18:02

String pincode = "589877";

    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\d{6}");

\d indicates the digits. inside the braces the number of digits Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(pincode);

    if (matcher.matches()) {
        System.out.println("Pincode is Valid");
        return true;
    } else {
        System.out.println("pincode must be a 6 digit Number");
share|improve this answer
    
Did you read the question? This is not what OP was asking. –  Syon Aug 14 '13 at 17:50

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