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Consider the following problem:

A multi-line string $junk contains some lines which are encoded in UTF-8 and some in ISO-8859-1. I don't know a priori which lines are in which encoding, so heuristics will be needed.

I want to turn $junk into pure UTF-8 with proper re-encoding of the ISO-8859-1 lines. Also, in the event of errors in the processing I want to provide a "best effort result" rather than throwing an error.

My current attempt looks like this:

$junk = force_utf8($junk);

sub force_utf8 {
  my $input = shift;
  my $output = '';
  foreach my $line (split(/\n/, $input)) {
    if (utf8::valid($line)) {
      utf8::decode($line);
    }
    $output .= "$line\n";
  }
  return $output;
}

Obviously the conversion will never be perfect since we're lacking information about the original encoding of each line. But is this the "best effort result" we can get?

How would you improve the heuristics/functionality of the force_utf8(...) sub?

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You keep asking people to comment on your code, but you're not listening to what they are saying. Comments on the code are useless if you're whole strategy is wrong. –  mpeters Mar 31 '10 at 19:12
    
mpeters: I'm aware of the limitations of the approach and hence the need for heuristics - those things are understood. My question is more along the lines of "I understand this won't be optimal, but given those assumptions is this the best we can do"? So far that question remains open. –  knorv Mar 31 '10 at 19:28
    
Here is one comment on the code: Don't use & to call a subroutine. force_utf8($junk) is enough. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 31 '10 at 22:14
    
Sinan: Good point! Fixed! –  knorv Mar 31 '10 at 23:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have no useful advice to offer except that I would have tried using Encode::Guess first.

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You might be able to fix it up using a bit of domain knowledge. For example, é is not a likely character combination in ISO-8859-1; it is much more likely to be UTF-8 é.

If your input is limited to a restricted pool of characters, you can also use a heuristic such as assuming à will never occur in your input stream.

Without this kind of domain knowledge, your problem is in general intractable.

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The code will handle inputs in a wide variety of languages, so enumerating specific translations is unfortunately not an option. –  knorv Mar 31 '10 at 19:31

Just by looking at a character it will be hard to tell if it is ISO-8859-1 or UTF-8 encoded. The problem is that both are 8-bit encodings, so simply looking at the MSb is not sufficient. For every line, then, I would transcode the line assuming it is UTF-8. When an invalid UTF-8 encoding is found re-transcode the line assuming that the line is really ISO-8859-1. The problem with this heuristic is that you might transcode ISO-8859-1 lines that are also well-formed UTF-8 lines; however without external information about $junk there is no way to tell which is appropriate.

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2  
UTF-8 is NOT an 8-bit encoding. It reperesent commonly-used Western characters in 8 bits ("low" or "7-bit" ASCII), but will use multibyte characters if needed. –  DaveE Mar 31 '10 at 20:10
    
UTF-8 is an 8-bit encoding that is also 100% compatible with 7-bit ASCII. Whether or not it uses all 8 bits for a given character is orthogonal to the point. –  fbrereto Mar 31 '10 at 22:06
    
No, it is not an 8-bit encoding. While some UTF-8 strings might only consist of characters using 8 bits, any given UTF-8 character in a string can be up to four bytes (32 bits) in size. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8 or tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3629. –  DaveE Mar 31 '10 at 23:35
    
I see your point; I still think the heuristic will work for all intensive purposes. –  fbrereto Apr 1 '10 at 0:10
    
<pedantic> it's properly for all intents and purposes, e.g 'whatever your intent or whatever your purpose, this heuristic should work'. </pedantic> –  DaveE Apr 12 '10 at 21:40

Take a look at this article. UTF-8 is optimised to represent Western language characters in 8 bits but it's not limited to 8-bits-per-character. The multibyte characters use common bit patterns to indicate if they are multibyte, and how many bytes the character uses. If you can safely assume only the two encodings in your string, the rest should be simple.

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In short, I opted to solve my problem with "file -bi" and "iconv -f ISO-8859-1 -t UTF-8".

I recently ran across a similar problem in trying to normalize the encoding of file names. I had a mixture of ISO-8859-1, UTF-8, and ASCII. As I realized wile processing the files I had added complications caused by the directory name having one encoding that was different then the file's encoding.

I originally tried to use Perl but it could not properly differentiate between UTF-8 and ISO-8859-1 resulting in garbled UTF-8.

In my case it was a one time conversion on a reasonable file count, so I opted for a slow method that I knew about and worked with no errors for me (mostly because only 1-2 non-adjacent chars per line used special ISO-8859-1 codes)

Option #1 converts ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8

cat mixed_text.txt |
while read i do
type=${"$(echo "$i" | file -bi -)"#*=}
if [[ $type == 'iso-8859-1' ]]; then
    echo "$i" | iconv -f ISO-8859-1 -t UTF-8
else
    echo "$i"
fi
done > utf8_text.txt

Option #2 converts to ISO-8859-1 to ASCII

cat mixed_text.txt |
while read i do
type=${"$(echo "$i" | file -bi -)"#*=}
if [[ $type == 'iso-8859-1' ]]; then
    echo "$i" | iconv -f ISO-8859-1 -t ASCII//TRANSLIT
else
    echo "$i"
fi
done > utf8_text.txt
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