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I'm trying to learn to play with OpenGL GLSL shaders. I've written a very simple program to simply create a shader and compile it. However, whenever I get to the compile step, I get the error:

Error: Preprocessor error Error: failed to preprocess the source.

Here's my very simple code:

#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <GL/glut.h>
#include <GL/glext.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

const int screenWidth = 640;
const int screenHeight = 480;

const GLchar* gravity_shader[] = {
    "#version 140"
    "uniform float t;"
    "uniform mat4 MVP;"
    "in vec4 pos;"
    "in vec4 vel;"
    "const vec4 g = vec4(0.0, 0.0, -9.80, 0.0);"

    "void main() {"
    "   vec4 position = pos;"
    "   position += t*vel + t*t*g;"

    "   gl_Position = MVP * position;"
    "}"
};

double pointX = (double)screenWidth/2.0;
double pointY = (double)screenWidth/2.0;

void initShader() {
    GLuint shader = glCreateShader(GL_VERTEX_SHADER);
    glShaderSource(shader, 1, gravity_shader, NULL);
    glCompileShader(shader);
    GLint compiled = true;
    glGetShaderiv(shader, GL_COMPILE_STATUS, &compiled);
    if(!compiled) {
        GLint length;
        GLchar* log;
        glGetShaderiv(shader, GL_INFO_LOG_LENGTH, &length);
        log = (GLchar*)malloc(length);
        glGetShaderInfoLog(shader, length, &length, log);
        std::cout << log <<std::endl;
        free(log);
    }

    exit(0);
}

bool myInit() {
    initShader();
    glClearColor(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
    glPointSize(1.0);
    glLineWidth(1.0f);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    gluOrtho2D(0.0, (GLdouble) screenWidth, 0.0, (GLdouble) screenHeight);
    glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);

    return true;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    glutInit(&argc, argv);
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_RGB);
    glutInitWindowSize(screenWidth, screenHeight);
    glutInitWindowPosition(100, 150);
    glutCreateWindow("Mouse Interaction Display");

    myInit();
    glutMainLoop();

    return 0;
}

Where am I going wrong? If it helps, I am trying to do this on a Acer Aspire One with an atom processor and integrated Intel video running the latest Ubuntu. It's not very powerful, but then again, this is a very simple shader. Thanks a lot for taking a look!

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1  
Which GL version and GLSL extensions does the driver say it supports? On a GMA 950 your #version 140 may be...optimistic. –  genpfault Mar 31 '10 at 18:27
1  
Well, I think I have openGL 1.40. I did a glxinfo|more and I see OpenGL version string: 1.4 Mesa 7.6 server glx version string: 1.2 client glx version string: 1.4 GLX version: 1.2 As for extensions, I see a bunch of GLX extensions but none with GLSL in them. Could that mean that GLSL is not supported on my computer? –  Brent Parker Mar 31 '10 at 18:52
1  
Yeah, OpenGL 1.4 doesn't have GLSL shader support. Check the spec: opengl.org/registry/doc/glspec21.20061201.pdf –  genpfault Mar 31 '10 at 19:42
1  
Thanks genpfault. I appreciate your help. It looks like I'm going to have to play with this on my other machine that DOES support OpenGL 2.0. It's just not quite as portable as my little laptop. Thanks again! –  Brent Parker Mar 31 '10 at 20:06
    
Like I said in the Answers you could use the Mesa software renderer on your netbook, it will just be slower than a hardware implementation. –  genpfault Mar 31 '10 at 22:08
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're just starting out you may be better off by running against the Mesa software renderer, which should provide full (though slow) OpenGL 2.1 support.

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I suspect this is one of those problems that's so basic you're looking right past it. After the C++ compiler does string concatenation, the beginning of your shader source code will look like this:

"#version 140uniform float t;"

I'm pretty sure it's complaining because "140uniform" doesn't fit its idea of a number.

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