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I've heard that it's possible with extension methods, but I can't quite figure it out myself. I'd like to see a specific example if possible.

Thanks!

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8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Check this articles:

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The first article is not that good. It's just showing extension methods. The second one is really what do you want. –  regisbsb May 22 at 9:41

It really depends on what you mean by "mixin" - everyone seems to have a slightly different idea. The kind of mixin I'd like to see (but which isn't available in C#) is making implementation-through-composition simple:

public class Mixin : ISomeInterface
{
    private SomeImplementation impl implements ISomeInterface;

    public void OneMethod()
    {
        // Specialise just this method
    }
}

The compiler would implement ISomeInterface just by proxying every member to "impl" unless there was another implementation in the class directly.

None of this is possible at the moment though :)

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7  
Anders please add this to C# 5!! –  Schneider Aug 26 '10 at 5:51
30  
I find it annoying that C++ experts make statements like "Prefer composition to inheritance" yet the language (C++ or C#) offers precious little help to do the "right thing". –  Dan Sep 27 '10 at 14:10
2  
Just saw a connect open on this on the VS Feedback rss feed. Go and vote if you likes. –  Will Dec 3 '10 at 18:15
2  
I've started implementing roles in C#. Take a look. They can implement interfaces and bring these implementations to composing classes. –  Jordão Jun 5 '11 at 0:31
5  
@JonSkeet: I am not the downvoter, but since the question requests a specific example, I expect downvoter was nonplussed that the provided answer is a "Wouldn't it be nice?" rather than a presently-practical solution. –  Conspicuous Compiler Dec 19 '11 at 20:37

There is an open source framework that enables you to implement mixins via C#. Have a look on http://remix.codeplex.com/.

It is very easy to implement mixins with this framework. Just have a look on the samples and the "Additional Information" links given on the page.

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remix.codeplex.com has just been published –  Stefan Papp Mar 23 '11 at 10:17
    
I used my reputation power to fix the link! –  erisco Aug 15 '12 at 1:17

LinFu and Castle's DynamicProxy implement mixins. COP (Composite Oriented Programming) could be considered as making a whole paradigm out of mixins. This post from Anders Noras has useful informations and links.

EDIT: This is all possible with C# 2.0, without extension methods

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I usually employ this pattern:

public interface IColor
{
    byte Red   {get;}
    byte Green {get;}
    byte Blue  {get;}
}

public static class ColorExtensions
{
    public static byte Luminance(this IColor c)
    {
        return (byte)(c.Red*0.3 + c.Green*0.59+ c.Blue*0.11);
    }
}

I have the two definitions in the same source file/namespace. That way the extensions are always available when the interface is used (with 'using').

This gives you a limited mixin as described in CMS' first link.

Limitations:

  • no data fields
  • no properties (you'll have to call myColor.Luminance() with parentheses, extension properties anyone?)

It's still sufficient for many situations.

It would be nice if they (MS) could add some compiler magic to auto-generate the extension class:

public interface IColor
{
    byte Red   {get;}
    byte Green {get;}
    byte Blue  {get;}

    // compiler generates anonymous extension class
    public static byte Luminance(this IColor c)     
    {
        return (byte)(c.Red*0.3 + c.Green*0.59+ c.Blue*0.11);
    }
}

Although Jon's proposed compiler trick would be even nicer.

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You could also augment the extension method approach to incorporate state, in a pattern not unlike WPF's attached properties.

Here is an example with minimum boilerplate. Note that no modification are required on the target classes, including adding interfaces, unless you need to deal with the target class polymorphically - in which case you end up with something very close to actual Multiple Inheritance.

// Mixin class: mixin infrastructure and mixin component definitions
public static class Mixin
{ 
    // =====================================
    // ComponentFoo: Sample mixin component
    // =====================================

    //  ComponentFooState: ComponentFoo contents
    class ComponentFooState
    {
        public ComponentFooState() {
            // initialize as you like
            this.Name = "default name";
        }

        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    // ComponentFoo methods

    // if you like, replace T with some interface 
    // implemented by your target class(es)

    public static void 
    SetName<T>(this T obj, string name) {
        var state = GetState(component_foo_states, obj);

        // do something with "obj" and "state"
        // for example: 

        state.Name = name + " the " + obj.GetType();


    }
    public static string
    GetName<T>(this T obj) {
        var state = GetState(component_foo_states, obj);

        return state.Name; 
    }

    // =====================================
    // boilerplate
    // =====================================

    //  instances of ComponentFoo's state container class,
    //  indexed by target object
    static readonly Dictionary<object, ComponentFooState>
    component_foo_states = new Dictionary<object, ComponentFooState>();

    // get a target class object's associated state
    // note lazy instantiation
    static TState
    GetState<TState>(Dictionary<object, TState> dict, object obj) 
    where TState : new() {
        TState ret;
        if(!dict.TryGet(obj, out ret))
            dict[obj] = ret = new TState();

        return ret;
    }

}

Usage:

var some_obj = new SomeClass();
some_obj.SetName("Johny");
Console.WriteLine(some_obj.GetName()); // "Johny the SomeClass"

Note that it also works with null instances, since extension methods naturally do.

You might also consider using a WeakDictionary implementation to avoid memory leaks caused by the collection's holding on to target class references as keys.

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1  
The signature of GetState only has one Type Arg, but the calls to GetState by GetName and SetName pass in two. How is this really supposed to work? –  Thick_propheT Aug 13 '14 at 19:02
    
@Thick_propheT, you're right of course. I made a few simplifications after the original post, but seem to have missed this bit. Thanks! –  staafl Aug 14 '14 at 18:06

I needed something similar so I came up with the following using Reflection.Emit. In the following code a new type is dynamically generated which has a private member of type 'mixin'. All the calls to methods of 'mixin' interface are forwarded to this private member. A single parameter constructor is defined that takes an instance which implements the 'mixin' interface. Basically, it is equal to writing the following code for a given concrete type T and interface I:

class Z : T, I
{
    I impl;

    public Z(I impl)
    {
        this.impl = impl;
    }

    // Implement all methods of I by proxying them through this.impl
    // as follows: 
    //
    // I.Foo()
    // {
    //    return this.impl.Foo();
    // }
}

This is the class:

public class MixinGenerator
{
    public static Type CreateMixin(Type @base, Type mixin)
    {
        // Mixin must be an interface
        if (!mixin.IsInterface)
            throw new ArgumentException("mixin not an interface");

        TypeBuilder typeBuilder = DefineType(@base, new Type[]{mixin});

        FieldBuilder fb = typeBuilder.DefineField("impl", mixin, FieldAttributes.Private);

        DefineConstructor(typeBuilder, fb);

        DefineInterfaceMethods(typeBuilder, mixin, fb);

        Type t = typeBuilder.CreateType();

        return t;
    }

    static AssemblyBuilder assemblyBuilder;
    private static TypeBuilder DefineType(Type @base, Type [] interfaces)
    {
        assemblyBuilder = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.DefineDynamicAssembly(
            new AssemblyName(Guid.NewGuid().ToString()), AssemblyBuilderAccess.RunAndSave);

        ModuleBuilder moduleBuilder = assemblyBuilder.DefineDynamicModule(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        TypeBuilder b = moduleBuilder.DefineType(Guid.NewGuid().ToString(),
            @base.Attributes,
            @base,
            interfaces);

        return b;
    }
    private static void DefineConstructor(TypeBuilder typeBuilder, FieldBuilder fieldBuilder)
    {
        ConstructorBuilder ctor = typeBuilder.DefineConstructor(
            MethodAttributes.Public, CallingConventions.Standard, new Type[] { fieldBuilder.FieldType });

        ILGenerator il = ctor.GetILGenerator();

        // Call base constructor
        ConstructorInfo baseCtorInfo =  typeBuilder.BaseType.GetConstructor(new Type[]{});
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Call, typeBuilder.BaseType.GetConstructor(new Type[0]));

        // Store type parameter in private field
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Stfld, fieldBuilder);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
    }

    private static void DefineInterfaceMethods(TypeBuilder typeBuilder, Type mixin, FieldInfo instanceField)
    {
        MethodInfo[] methods = mixin.GetMethods();

        foreach (MethodInfo method in methods)
        {
            MethodInfo fwdMethod = instanceField.FieldType.GetMethod(method.Name,
                method.GetParameters().Select((pi) => { return pi.ParameterType; }).ToArray<Type>());

            MethodBuilder methodBuilder = typeBuilder.DefineMethod(
                                            fwdMethod.Name,
                                            // Could not call absract method, so remove flag
                                            fwdMethod.Attributes & (~MethodAttributes.Abstract),
                                            fwdMethod.ReturnType,
                                            fwdMethod.GetParameters().Select(p => p.ParameterType).ToArray());

            methodBuilder.SetReturnType(method.ReturnType);
            typeBuilder.DefineMethodOverride(methodBuilder, method);

            // Emit method body
            ILGenerator il = methodBuilder.GetILGenerator();
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldfld, instanceField);

            // Call with same parameters
            for (int i = 0; i < method.GetParameters().Length; i++)
            {
                il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg, i + 1);
            }
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Call, fwdMethod);
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        }
    }
}

This is the usage:

public interface ISum
{
    int Sum(int x, int y);
}

public class SumImpl : ISum
{
    public int Sum(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
}

public class Multiply
{        
    public int Mul(int x, int y)
    {
        return x * y;
    }
}

// Generate a type that does multiply and sum
Type newType = MixinGenerator.CreateMixin(typeof(Multiply), typeof(ISum));

object instance = Activator.CreateInstance(newType, new object[] { new SumImpl() });

int res = ((Multiply)instance).Mul(2, 4);
Console.WriteLine(res);
res = ((ISum)instance).Sum(1, 4);
Console.WriteLine(res);
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If you have a base class that can store data you can enforce compiler safety and use marker interfaces. That's more or less what "Mixins in C# 3.0" from the accepted answer proposes.

public static class ModelBaseMixins
{
    public interface IHasStuff{ }

    public static void AddStuff<TObjectBase>(this TObjectBase objectBase, Stuff stuff) where TObjectBase: ObjectBase, IHasStuff
    {
        var stuffStore = objectBase.Get<IList<Stuff>>("stuffStore");
        stuffStore.Add(stuff);
    }
}

The ObjectBase:

public abstract class ObjectBase
{
    protected ModelBase()
    {
        _objects = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    }

    private readonly Dictionary<string, object> _objects;

    internal void Add<T>(T thing, string name)
    {
        _objects[name] = thing;
    }

    internal T Get<T>(string name)
    {
        T thing = null;
        _objects.TryGetValue(name, out thing);

        return (T) thing;
    }

So if you have a Class you can inherit from 'ObjectBase' and decorate with IHasStuff you can add sutff now

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