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Are there major C/C++ implementations where the longjmp function "unwinds", i.e. where it interacts with destructors for automatic-storage objects, __attribute__((__cleanup__(...))), POSIX threads cancellation handlers, etc. rather than just restoring the register context saved by setjmp? I'm particularly interested in the existence (or non-existence) of POSIX implementations with this property, but C/C++ in general are also interesting.

For the bounty, I'm looking for a POSIX-conforming or at least POSIX-like system, as opposed to Windows which has already been mentioned.

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16  
I seriously doubt it. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 28 '14 at 20:30
4  
Yes, your favorite, MSVC++ implements it. – Hans Passant Aug 28 '14 at 20:38
7  
@Christophe. But msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yz2ez4as.aspx says that it does call destructors if you compiled with /EH. – rici Aug 28 '14 at 20:51
4  
I'd recommend you to throw an exception, an catch it in place you want to stop unwinding. – GingerPlusPlus Aug 28 '14 at 20:56
5  
To be clear, you don't care if the behavior is legal, you just care if such an implementation exists? Because, C++11 says using setjmp/longjmp on code where unwinding would call non-trivial destructors causes undefined behavior. – jxh Sep 3 '14 at 19:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted
+300

Interix (SUA) by default does not call destructors, but in x86 mode, does have an option for it.

Taking this test program, saved as test.cc:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <setjmp.h>

struct A {
  ~A() { puts("~A"); }
};

jmp_buf buf;

void f() {
  A a;
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

int main() {
  if (setjmp (buf))
    return 0;

  f();
}

here's how Interix behaves. For brevity, I've omitted the required proper setup of PATH.

$ cc -mx86 test.cc && ./a.out
$ cc -mx86 -X /EHa test.cc && ./a.out
cl : Command line warning D9025 : overriding '/EHs' with '/EHa'
~A
$ cc -mamd64 test.cc && ./a.out
$ cc -mamd64 -X /EHa test.cc && ./a.out
cl : Command line warning D9025 : overriding '/EHs' with '/EHa'
$ 

The comments suggest that cc -X /EHa does not conform to POSIX, for example because /EHa would catch signals. That is not entirely true:

$ cat test.cc
#include <signal.h>
int main() {
  try {
    raise(SIGFPE);
  } catch (...) {
    // ignore
  }
}
$ cc -mx86 -X /EHa test.cc && ./a.out
cl : Command line warning D9025 : overriding '/EHs' with '/EHa'
Floating point exception (core dumped)

If I change raise(SIGFPE) to a division by zero, I do indeed see that the exception handler catches it, but neither POSIX nor C++ requires any particular behaviour for that, so that doesn't affect conformance. It is also not the case that all asynchronous signals are caught: for this program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>
void sigint(int signal) {
  puts("sigint");
  exit(0);
}
int main() {
  signal(SIGINT, sigint);
  try {
    for (;;) ;
  } catch (...) {
    // ignore
  }
}

"sigint" is printed after Ctrl-C, as expected. I don't see a reason for claiming that this implementation fails to meet POSIX requirements.

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1  
@R.. What's confusing is that the /EH* documentation seems to be saying the exact opposite of what it actually says. I think that what's happening, and I'm not entirely sure my understanding is correct, is that longjmp is implemented using SEH, and the /EHa option forces f to set up both a SEH handler and a C++ exception handler. With /EHs, only a C++ exception handler is set up. And on amd64, longjmp is not implemented using SEH. – hvd Sep 6 '14 at 15:04
3  
There are always two sides of a medal. The system must support POSIX-conformity and the program has to use it. But for the bounty, R.. is searching for a POSIX-compliant implementation (1st property), that calls destructors during unwind (2nd property). Sure, Interix supports both properties, but the 2nd one is only supported, if you compile the program in a way, where the 1st property isn't supported. So I think this is problematic. BTW even Microsoft warns their users about using SEH and /EHa for portable programs. – Stefan Weiser Sep 8 '14 at 6:37
1  
@StefanWeiser It's a fair point that if cc -X /EHa is not a POSIX-conforming implementation, then it doesn't answer what the OP asked. I've yet to see evidence that it mishandles any valid program: POSIX doesn't define the interaction between signals and exception handlers, because POSIX doesn't define anything relating to C++ at all. Nonetheless, I'll run some more tests when I get the chance. – hvd Sep 8 '14 at 7:17
4  
I have no link, but it is easy to prove. If the compilation with /EHa won't break POSIX signals, then the following program would have an exit code != 0, because of an fatal error, as it does e.g. here on CentOS: ideone.com/HpOmzf. This is because POSIX defines, that the exit code is set to an value != 0 in case of an unhandled signal. Compiling it with /EHa let it return 0, because every exception is caught (the div0 exception too) as msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1deeycx5.aspx claims. – Stefan Weiser Sep 8 '14 at 14:15
2  
@hvd, @R..: I guess, that we don't speak in the same terms of compatibility. A program is POSIX compatible IMO, if it will result in the same behaviour on every POSIX compatible system. You could exchange the SIGFPE with any other signal, that MS throws and therefore catches. BTW the behaviour is undefined as long as it is not raised by raise or kill. So I could update the program using raise... With the same result... – Stefan Weiser Sep 9 '14 at 2:28

I'm trying to understand the logical goals that are trying to be accomplished here.

The setjmp(3) manual page states:

setjmp() saves the stack context/environment in env for later use by longjmp(3). The stack context will be invalidated if the function which called setjmp() returns.

This says that if you return from the stack context where the setjmp() call was made, you can no longer longjmp back to it. Otherwise, undefined behavior.

Ok, So it seems to me that at the point that a valid longjmp call is made, setjmp must be somewhere in the current stack context. Therefore, a longjmp that unwinds the stack and calls all destructors of auto variables, etc, appears to be logically equivalent to throwing an exception, and catching it at the point the setjmp() call was originally made.

How does throwing and catching an exception is different from your desired setjmp/longjmp semantics? If, say, you had your wished-for setjmp/longjmp implementation, then how does replacing it with an ordinary try/throw, and catching the thrown exception, be different?

The only differences that I could see is the extra inner scope introduced by the try/catch block; while setjmp does not really open a new inner scope.

So, the answer here appears to be very easy: every compliant C++ implementation has a setjmp/longjmp equivalent that has the desired semantics. It's called try/throw/catch.

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My interest isn't whether there's something similar or "equivalent" to longjmp which unwinds, but whether longjmp does. See the discussion so far in comments. – R.. Sep 6 '14 at 4:20
    
POSIX is clear on this, it does not. – Sam Varshavchik Sep 6 '14 at 13:17
    
No. The closest thing POSIX defines akin to unwinding is thread cancellation, and it's explicitly undefined what happens when you bypass cleanup contexts with longjmp. So an individual implementation could leave it undefined, or attempt to define a behavior for what happens then. And of course POSIX has nothing to say about the interaction with C++ exceptions since, from a POSIX perspective, C++ does not even exist. – R.. Sep 6 '14 at 13:23

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