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Is there a quick way in Python to replace strings by starting from the end? For example:

>>> def rreplace(old, new, occurence)
>>>     ... # Code to replace the last occurences of old by new

>>> '<div><div>Hello</div></div>'.rreplace('</div>','</bad>',1)
>>> '<div><div>Hello</div></bad>'
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2  
Good question, judging by the complicated solutions to such a simple problem. –  Justin Ardini Mar 31 '10 at 20:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 55 down vote accepted
>>> def rreplace(s, old, new, occurrence):
...  li = s.rsplit(old, occurrence)
...  return new.join(li)
... 
>>> s
'1232425'
>>> rreplace(s, '2', ' ', 2)
'123 4 5'
>>> rreplace(s, '2', ' ', 3)
'1 3 4 5'
>>> rreplace(s, '2', ' ', 4)
'1 3 4 5'
>>> rreplace(s, '2', ' ', 0)
'1232425'
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3  
Nice solution ! –  ChristopheD Mar 31 '10 at 20:34
    
+1 I think this will be quite fast too. –  Mark Byers Mar 31 '10 at 20:38
3  
Very nice! In an unscientific benchmark of replacing the last occurrence of an expression in a typical string in my program (> 500 characters), your solution was three times faster than Alex's solution and four times faster than Mark's solution. Thanks to all for your answers! –  Barthelemy Mar 31 '10 at 20:44
    
thanks for the benchmark result –  m-ric Sep 6 '12 at 20:52

I'm not going to pretend that this is the most efficient way of doing it, but it's a simple way. It reverses all the strings in question, performs an ordinary replacement using str.replace on the reversed strings, then reverses the result back the right way round:

>>> def rreplace(s, old, new, count):
...     return (s[::-1].replace(old[::-1], new[::-1], count))[::-1]
...
>>> rreplace('<div><div>Hello</div></div>', '</div>', '</bad>', 1)
'<div><div>Hello</div></bad>'
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Here is a recursive solution to the problem:

def rreplace(s, old, new, occurence = 1):

    if occurence == 0:
        return s

    left, found, right = s.rpartition(old)

    if found == "":
        return right
    else:
        return rreplace(left, old, new, occurence - 1) + new + right
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If you know that the 'old' string does not contain any special characters you can do it with a regex:

In [44]: s = '<div><div>Hello</div></div>'

In [45]: import re

In [46]: re.sub(r'(.*)</div>', r'\1</bad>', s)
Out[46]: '<div><div>Hello</div></bad>'
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