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I'm looking for a way of making a method "personal" - note NOT PRIVATE to a class

here is an example - by "personal" I mean the behaviour of method "foo"

class A
  def foo
     "foo"
  end
end

class B < A
  def foo
      "bar"
  end
end

class C < B
end

a=A.new; b=B.new;c=C.new

I'm looking for a way of producing the following behaviour

a.foo #=> "foo"

b.foo #=> "bar"

c.foo #=> "foo" (ultimate base class method called)
share|improve this question
    
Interesting question. FYI: In .NET, this behaviour is called method shadowing. –  Dario Mar 31 '10 at 20:12
    
This seems like a bad idea to me. –  Alex Wayne Mar 31 '10 at 20:16

6 Answers 6

Sometimes you don't really want an "is a" (inheritance) relationship. Sometimes what you want is "quacks like a." Sharing code among "quacks like a" classes is easily done by using modules to "mix in" methods:

#!/usr/bin/ruby1.8

module BasicFoo
  def foo
     "foo"
  end
end

class A
  include BasicFoo
end

class B
  def foo
      "bar"
  end
end

class C
  include BasicFoo
end

p A.new.foo    # => "foo"
p B.new.foo    # => "bar"
p C.new.foo    # => "foo"
share|improve this answer

You can write a shortcut function to handle personalizing methods.

def personalize(*methodNames)
  old_init = instance_method(:initialize)
  klass = self
  modul = Module.new {
    methodNames.each { |m|
      define_method(m, klass.instance_method(m)) if klass.method_defined?(m)
    }
  }
  methodNames.each { |m| 
    remove_method(m) if method_defined?(m)
  }
  define_method(:initialize) { |*args|
    # I don't like having to check instance_of?, but this is the only way I 
    # could thing of preventing the extension of child classes. At least it only
    # has to happen once, during initialization.
    extend modul if instance_of?(klass)
    old_init.bind(self).call(*args)
  }
  self
end

class A
  def foo
     "foo"
  end
end

class B < A
  def foo
      "bar"
  end
  def bam
    'bug-AWWK!'
  end
  personalize :foo, :bam, :nometh
end

class C < B
end

a=A.new; b=B.new; c=C.new
a.foo #=> "foo"
b.foo #=> "bar"
b.bam #=> "bug-AWWK!"
c.foo #=> "foo"
C.instance_method(:foo) # => #<UnboundMethod: C(A)#foo>
c.bam #throws NoMethodError
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant - this is exactly what I was trying to achieve The application is a specialist pricing application (on rails) that builds a detailed bill of materials from a high level specification, by walking a tree of possible items. The business logic is all kept separate, with one logic class per node. There is a general BusinessLogic class, with subclassing for individual nodes (up to 3 layers). There are some specific places where I want a 3rd level subclass to revert to base class (ie BusinessLogic) behaviour. This is elegant! Thanks very much Steve –  steve gooberman-hill Apr 1 '10 at 6:15
    
@steve: note that personalize is untested. You should do so before relying on it too heavily. –  outis Apr 1 '10 at 6:36

Answering this is a bit tricky since I don't really see what you want to accomplish in practice, but you could try something like

class C < B
  def foo
    self.class.ancestors[-3].instance_method(:foo).bind(self).call
  end
end

(The ancestors[-3] assumes that A inherits from Object and Kernel and your intent was to access the method from the topmost non-builtin class. Of course you could substitute self.class.ancestors[-3] with just A, or figure out the class from the Array ancestors yourself, etc.)

In practice it would be simpler to alias the original in class B if you can modify it (i.e. alias :foo_from_A :foo in class B < A before the new def foo, then you can call foo_from_A in C). Or just redefine what you want in C. Or design the whole class hierarchy differently.

share|improve this answer

Seems like it could be confusing, but here's one option:

class A
  def foo
     "foo"
  end
end

class B < A
 def initialize #when constructing, add the new foo method to each instance
    def self.foo
      "bar"
    end 
 end
end

class C < B
 def initialize #when constructing, do nothing
 end
end

More generally, using a similar approach, you can always add a method to a given instance, which of course has no effect on inherited classes or indeed on other instances of the same class.

If you give us specifics of what you're ultimately trying to accomplish we can probably be more helpful.

share|improve this answer
1  
If we're modifying B, I'd advocate alias :foo_from_A :foo to allow its subclasses to explicitly call foo_from_A (e.g. in their redefinition of foo) rather than make B's foo uninheritable. –  Arkku Mar 31 '10 at 21:16

Instead of creating 'personal' methods, change your inheritance structure.

It appears that you want the C class to have only some of the same functionality of the B class while not making changes to the A class.

class A
  def foo
     "foo"
  end
end

class BnC < A
end

class B < BnC
  def foo
      "bar"
  end
end

class C < BnC
end

a=A.new; b=B.new;c=C.new
share|improve this answer

There's no standard way of doing this. It circumvents how inheritance works. You could implement B's method to do the logic like this:

def foo
  instance_of?(B) ? "bar" : super
end

And you could of course define a method on Class that would do this for you similar to public and private.

class Class
  def personal(*syms)
    special_class = self
    syms.each do |sym|
      orig = instance_method(sym)
      define_method(sym) {|*args| instance_of?(special_class) ? orig.bind(self).call(*args) : super}
    end
  end
end

Then you can personal :foo in B just like you'd private :foo.

(This isn't at all optimized and I didn't implement the zero-argument behavior that public and private have because frankly it's a huge PITA to do right and even then it's a hack.)

share|improve this answer
    
re. the instance_of?(B) suggestion; I'd rather alias the original foo from A and call the alias from C, instead of checking on every call. Another problem is that class D < B would also unexpectedly use foo foo from A instead of B. –  Arkku Mar 31 '10 at 20:58
    
One of us seems to have misunderstood the asker's intent, because that's not a "problem" — it's the intended behavior. B's implementation is special and any subclasses are supposed to use A's version. And calling something different from C also appears to violate the requirements given. –  Chuck Mar 31 '10 at 21:27
    
It may be that I my interpretation (C's method should be special) is wrong and it's indeed B's method that should be the special, uninheritable case, in which case I'd pick JacobM's solution of definining self.foo in B's initialize. As for calling something different from C, the aliased foo from A would naturally be called from C's redefinition of foo, so the call would still be c.foo as per asker's desired behaviour. –  Arkku Mar 31 '10 at 21:36
    
@Arkku: JacobM's solution depends on C defining initialize and not calling super on that method — which are pretty poor bets in the general case. I was going for a non-leaky abstraction. Testing instance_of? is not that costly anyway. And as for aliasing foo, note that foo is not redefined in C, so there is no "C's redefinition of foo". –  Chuck Mar 31 '10 at 22:16
    
True that the asker's original C doesn't have foo, but neither does his foo in B have instance_of?. He didn't specify which of the classes could be modified or what exactly is the goal here: to make B's foo uninheritable, or to define C so that it inherits A's foo. Either seems equally possible - personally I first assumed the latter since the asker specifies "ultimate base class method called" for c.foo. –  Arkku Apr 1 '10 at 0:04

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