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I was asked by somebody in an interview for web front end job, to write a function that generates all permutations of a string, such as "abc" (or consider it ['a', 'b', 'c']).

so the expected result from the function, when given ['a', 'b', 'c'], is

abc
acb
bac
bca
cab
cba

Actually in my past 20 years of career, I have never needed to do something like that, especially when doing front end work for web programming.

What are some practical use of this problem nowadays, in web programming, front end or back end, I wonder?

As a side note, I kind of feel that expecting a result in 3 minutes might be "either he gets it or he doesn't", especially I was thinking of doing it by a procedural, non-recursive way at first. After the interview, I spent another 10 minutes and thought of how to do it using recursion, but expecting it to be solved within 3 minutes... may not be a good test of how qualified a person is, especially for front end work.

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Kinda' a fun problem, never done it before. Took me a couple minutes longer to write than I expected, but mostly because I did it in C# instead of F#. This really seems custom-made for a language with matching support. –  Greg D Mar 31 '10 at 22:48
    
If I was looking for someone with a strong algorithmic background, I would expect them to be able to describe a method of how to solve the problem almost instantaneously. –  Casebash Mar 31 '10 at 22:59
    
The 3 minutes might be tight, especially if they expect you to get something working. However if they only want some kind of algorithm description, then it's amply sufficient. –  Matthieu M. Apr 1 '10 at 12:04
    
And it is too easy a question for a Haskell job, cause the answer is permutations "abc" –  Ingo Feb 4 '13 at 12:51
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closed as primarily opinion-based by animuson Dec 31 '13 at 22:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

11 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Practical application (see below) is irrelevant. The interviewers are using this problem to weed out developers that don't know how to code. Effectively it's a FizzBuzz problem.

Some applications of permutations:

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2  
I have actually given this problem in interviews before, and really like it for the reason you stated. I don't spend my days writing recursions, but I consider it's important that a developer can recognize one at a minimum, and ideally get it to work. Plus, it's a fun problem. –  Mathias Mar 31 '10 at 23:20
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A practical application? Testing event driven software where partial ordering of events means you'll have to test the unordered sections with full permutations of the ordering of those events.

Well, that's besides the practical application of asking candidates if they can do it so we can disqualify some candidates on the grounds that we believe you are a bad programmer if you can't answer this question.

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If you want to return the results to a query in random order, for example to be fair to each of them. It appears that StackOverflow does this among equally rated answers.

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8  
What do you mean? To shuffle a list you don't need to generate all n! permutations and then pick one. You use Fisher-Yates. –  Steve Jessop Mar 31 '10 at 22:30
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Well, yes. But that will probabilistically eventually generate all the permutations. Can you think of anything closer? –  Potatoswatter Apr 1 '10 at 2:30
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One of my clients is a composer of music (André Cormier), and he asked me to write a permutation calculator to help him choose notes for melodic lines and chords:

http://juliusdavies.ca/andre/note_permute.html

Does that count as a practical application?

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Questionable but practical use: Finding anagrams, useful for cracking passwords.

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If you have a problem to solve like the travelling salesman problem which is based on a real life problem, then a simple but inefficient solution is to brute-force every possible permutation and see which is optimal. To do this it can be useful to have a function that generates the permutations. Obviously such a solution won't be practical for even quite small values of n.

For ordinary user interface programming, it seems unlikely you'd need to generate permutations. However it can be useful to know how to write recursive functions in general, For example if you have a tree view in your interface and need to perform an operation on every node in a subtree then a recursive function is a good approach.

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Umm ... you do NOT want to brute-force the traveling salesman problem. It is NP-complete; see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travelling_salesman_problem –  Stephen C Apr 1 '10 at 8:39
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@Stephen C: It's exactly because it is NP-complete (you can't do much better than brute force), that n is very likely to be small (a salesman probably cannot visit more than 5 or 6 cities in one day), and that the brute force approach is so simple, that a brute force solution might be appropriate in some situations. –  Mark Byers Apr 1 '10 at 9:07
    
Umm ... yea ... but don't think that you can brute-force solve TSP for N much larger than that. N! gets big really fast. –  Stephen C Apr 1 '10 at 13:03
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@Stephen: I get your point, but I think the main problem is that you can't reasonably expect to generate all permutations for N! unless N is small, regardless of what problem you are trying to solve. So I thought that if I was going to give an example of using this method then I might as well use a problem where n is likely to be small in real life, and which would otherwise be difficult to solve in any better way, rather than some of the suggestions others are making: eg. shuffling where there is an obvious faster and easy to implement solution. –  Mark Byers Apr 1 '10 at 13:28
    
As a mathematician, I couldn't resist chiming in. You can brute-force TSP for very small n: say 10-12, but most "real-world" TSPs have several dozen, several hundred, or even thousand points. (No, TSP is rarely used for actual travelling salesmen in the real world. Think about optimal chip placement order to minimise robotic arm travel time during high-speed electronics manufacturing, for example). For these large problems, heuristic approaches are taken such as genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, tabu search, greedy, etc... –  Ozzah Apr 25 '11 at 16:43
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One practical application within the gambling industry of generating permutations of symbols is to generate configuration tables to prove that no one combination of symbols appears more than any other symbol for win/loss configurations.

For example, take the canonical slot machine with 3 columns of bars, cherries, and keys. You don't want it to be that every single loser configuration is [cherry, bar, key] or the users will get pissed off. You also don't want it so that every time a [cherry, bar, key] combination comes up the next game is 100% guaranteed a winning combination.

It's beyond practical in the gambling industry: There are times when that's all you do in a working day.

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Testing a sorting algo.

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We've been doing this for calculating wilds in slot machine reels :)

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Jean-François Corbett Nov 16 '12 at 8:10
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Some practical applications include:

Routing / networking / parallel computing

Cryptographic algorithms

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Most permutation methods - generate a random permutation, generate a particular numbered permutation, stepping to the sequentially next/previous permutation, or generating all permutations - are very useful for one specific thing that a programmer should be doing a lot of...

Generating input data for unit tests.

Of course you should just have the algorithms in a library - preferably a standard one. Personally, I'd trust someone who takes ten or fifteen minutes to figure out a permutation-stepping algorithm more than someone who regurgitates it instantly - it isn't something you need to write every day (or every year, even) so keeping it memorised is a waste of neurons that could be doing a more useful job.

I might even award pragmatism points to the guy who gets his phone out and Googles it.

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Marks also for knowing a library function to do it for you: std::next_permutation, itertools.permutations(), whatever. –  Steve Jessop Apr 1 '10 at 0:27
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