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Is there a way to improve this:

private static int CountNewlines(string s)
{
    int len = s.Length;
    int c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < len;  i++)
    {
        if (s[i] == '\n') c++;
    }
    return c;
}

I'm particularly concerned about the Item accessor on the string. Not sure if it is just pointer arithmetic like C/C++.

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Where does the string come from? I assume since u are concerend about perf it is a large string? If this large string comes from a file or a webservice call then the question should be "fastest way to count newlines in a stream". The reason being converting the whole thing to a string will be expensive. –  Simon Mar 31 '10 at 22:54
2  
BTW, this could really be an april fool's, can't tell anymore :-) –  M.A. Hanin Mar 31 '10 at 22:59
    
I'm concerned about perf because #1, it's potentially large (32k) and #2, it's being used in an OnPaint() method in a Windows Forms control. So it is called often. –  Cheeso Mar 31 '10 at 23:32
    
@Hanin, why would this be April Fools? seems like a good foundational question. –  Cheeso Mar 31 '10 at 23:33
    
@Cheeso: There is no way to calculate the count of newline characters only in case you string variable is modified and to cache that result instead of recalculating the value on each paint? –  0xA3 Mar 31 '10 at 23:54
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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I tested these implementations

private static int Count1(string s)
{
    int len = s.Length;
    int c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < len;  i++)
    {
        if (s[i] == '\n') c++;
    }
    return c+1;
}

private static int Count2(string s)
{
    int count = -1;
    int index = -1;

    do
    {
        count++;
        index = s.IndexOf('\n', index + 1);
    }
    while (index != -1);

    return count+1;
}

private static int Count3(string s)
{
    return s.Count( c => c == '\n' ) + 1;
}


private static int Count4(string s)
{
    int n = 0;
    foreach( var c in s )
    {
        if ( c == '\n' ) n++;
    }
    return n+1;
}

private static int Count5(string s)
{
    var a = s.ToCharArray();
    int c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < a.Length; i++)
    {
        if (a[i]=='\n') c++;
    }
    return c+1;
}

Here are my timing results for 100000 iterations on a string of ~25k. Lower is faster.

              Time  Factor
Count1   4.8581503     1.4
Count2   4.1406059     1.2
Count3  45.3614124    13.4
Count4   3.3896130     1.0
Count5   5.9304543     1.7

Surprisingly, to me, the Enumerator implementation was fastest for me, by a significant degree - 20% faster than the next closest implementation. The results were repeatable, regardless of the order in which the methods were run. I also used a warmup phase to insure transient effects (jit, etc) were factored out.

This was for a release build (/optimize+)

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I'm pretty sure this won't be much slower than converting the string to bytes and checking those, if not faster. The String class should be highly optimized.

If this is a big string, maybe a parallel execution by several threads will make things faster :-)

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Parallel execution would only speed things up on a multicore/multiprocessor machine - but it can be an option for really big strings. –  LBushkin Mar 31 '10 at 22:54
    
Sure, and there is no point in creating more threads than the total amount of cores. If this string contains many line-breaks, it may just be a very big text file or something, so the OP may actually use this option... –  M.A. Hanin Mar 31 '10 at 22:57
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This is probably the most efficient option - the item accessor is internally optimized and you can treat it as if it performs pointer arithmentic.

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Well, String implements IEnumerable<char>, so I'd definitely try:

s.Count( c => c == '\n' )

As nice as this looks, the original method is 30x faster :)

I haven't given up on the IEnumerable yet, so I've also tried:

int n = 0;
foreach( var c in s )
{
    if ( c == '\n' ) n++;
}
return n;

which seems as fast as the original method.

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you could convert the string to a char array with "ToCharArray();" but i don't think it will improve the performance.. you could try to use unsafe code (pointer) instead of for but well that has its drawbacks to.

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Right, I could do that. I haven't tried that. It's a large string, and it will be called repeatedly, so I'm inclined to avoid creating new arrays just to count it. –  Cheeso Apr 2 '10 at 13:10
    
Will this be called on the same string more then once? You could have a dictonary with à weakreference as key and a int as result. This way you can cache the result.. –  Peter Apr 5 '10 at 20:51
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Make it an instance method, if you'll use it in a loop.

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How does this matter? –  0xA3 Mar 31 '10 at 23:49
    
like when using systemIO , calling file.Copy and new FileInfo .. .Copy(). Its from O'Reilly C# Cookbook –  Snoop Dogg Apr 1 '10 at 0:13
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