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I have this code to print out the vector (1 2 3) from vector.txt file but whenever I run the code to turn the vector into a matrix the 0's that fill up the matrix comes out as -85993460. Please help

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

void main()
{
    cout << "Loading vector.txt" << endl;
    FILE *file = fopen("vector.txt", "r");
    int vector[3];
    int b = 0;

    do{
        fscanf(file, "%i", &vector[b]);
        b++;
    }while(feof(file) == 0);


    //clear the screen.
    fclose(file);

    cout << "Loading matrix" << endl;

    int a[3][3],i,j;
    for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for(b=0; b<3;b++);
        a[0][i] = vector[i];
    }

    cout << " Vector rotation" << endl;


//Display the original matrix
    for(i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<3;j++)
    {
        cout<<a[i][j]<<" ";
    }
        cout<<endl;
    }
        cout<<"Transpose of above matrix is: "<<endl;
//Display the transpose matrix
    for(j=0;j<3;j++)
    {
        for(i=0;i<3;i++)
        {
        cout<<a[i][j]<<" ";
        }
    cout<<endl;
    }
//get character
    getch();
}
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7  
using namespace std; and naming variable as vector in VERY bad idea: int vector[3]; –  Piotr S. Aug 29 at 15:01
3  
I don't know of any current compiler which would compile this piece of code. void main is not C++. The rest is only technically C++ but actually C. Why don't you use std::string, std::vector and C++ streams? –  Christian Hackl Aug 29 at 15:02
1  
Why are you 3* trying to assign same value in the a? in: for(b=0; b<3;b++); a[0][i] = vector[i]; –  Ms. Nobody Aug 29 at 15:02
1  
Also, you don't check if the file was opened sucessfully. EIther place a check to see if file == NULL, or use C++ ifstream and check for !ifstream. –  PaulMcKenzie Aug 29 at 15:05
1  
@JeremyGonzales: Your code is pretty much broken beyond hope. You are using techniques which are common in C but are used in C++ only in very rare situations in very advanced software, when normal techniques do not deliver entirely satisfactory results. You should read about std::string, std::vector and C++ streams; and you will need a good book or tutorial. –  Christian Hackl Aug 29 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use ={} to 0-initialize your matrix:

int a[3][3] = {},i,j;
share|improve this answer
    
May I know why adding {} made transformed the garbage values into 0? I just want to know the reason. Thank you. –  Jeremy Gonzales Aug 29 at 15:38
    
    
Thank you once again! –  Jeremy Gonzales Aug 29 at 15:46

You are not initializing the matrix. The for loop for(b=0; b<3;b++); does nothing, and the line below it only gets executed once. Remove the semi-colon at the end of this for loop if you want to execute the next line, or anything at all, in this loop.

Because the matrix is not initialized in the loop, you are reading garbage values. -85993460 is just whatever was on the stack when the matrix was created.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip, but the outcome did not change in anyway :( –  Jeremy Gonzales Aug 29 at 15:03
    
Regardless, it doesn't look as if you ever initialize the matrix that you are instantiating. Where are you attempting to do so? –  Alex Kleiman Aug 29 at 15:05

I'm guessing you have a typo, it's more likely that your uninitialized values are showing up as -858993460, which is hex 0xCCCCCCCC, a common value used to fill uninitialized memory when compiling in debug mode.

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