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I'm converting a D2006 program to D2010. I have a value stored in a single byte per character string in my database and I need to load it into a control that has a LoadFromStream, so my plan was to write the string to a stream and use that with LoadFromStream. But it did not work. In studying the problem, I see an issue that tells me that I don't really understand how conversion from AnsiString to Unicode string works. Here is a piece of standalone code that illustrates the issue I am confused by:;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); {$O-}
var
  sBuffer: String;
  oStringStream: TStringStream;
  sAnsiString: AnsiString;
  sUnicodeString: String;
  iSize1,
  iSize2: Word;
begin
  sAnsiString := '12345';
  oStringStream := TStringStream.Create(sBuffer);
  sUnicodeString := sAnsiString;
  iSize1 := StringElementSize(sAnsiString);
  iSize2 := StringElementSize(sUnicodeString);
  oStringStream.WriteString(sUnicodeString);
end;

If you break on the last line, and inspect the Bytes property of oStringStream, you will see that it looks like this:

Bytes (49 {$31}, 50 {$32}, 51 {$33}, 52 {$34}, 53 {$35}

I was expecting that it might look something like

(49 {$31}, 00 {$00}, 50 {$32}, 00 {$00}, 51 {$33}, 00 {$00}, 
 52 {$34}, 00 {$00}, 53 {$35}, 00 {$00} ...

Apparently my expectations are in error. But then, how to convert an AnsiString to unicode?

I'm not getting the right results out of the LoadFromStream because it is reading from the stream two bytes at a time, but the data it is receiving is not arranged that way. What is it that I should do to give the LoadFromStream a well formed stream of data based on a unicode string?

Thank you for your help.

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3  
I don't believe there is sufficient information in the question to enable a meaningful answer. What type are the variables involved? This will be potentially significant in terms of any auto-conversions being triggered in the compiler generated code. Also in particular what is the type of oPayGrid? The presence of an sStream property on this object suggests it is not a standard VCL stream. Ideally I would like to see the code example in the question reworked/extended into a stand-alone, working example that demonstrates the behaviour without the need for further explanation/divination. –  Deltics Apr 1 '10 at 1:24
    
Hail to Aotearoa! Sorry. I was trying to avoid cluttering the question with unhelpful details. I guess I was too successful. oPaygrid is a Class(TObject). oPaygrid.sStream is a poorly named AnsiString. sUnicodeString is a Delphi string which by default is a unicode string. iSize1 and iSize2 are integers. My question is mainly conceptual. When an AnsiString is cast into a unicode string, should I expect to see two bytes per character in the unicode string? I'm not seeing that and it seems to be what is keeping me from successfully loading my control with LoadFromStream. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 1:41
    
You shouldn't use StringElementSize(). It is only necessary if your code is called from a half-migrated C++Builder module. The assignment sUnicodeString := sAnsiString corrects the string's payload to Char=WideChar so the call to StringElementSize will always return SizeOf(AnsiChar) for your AnsiString and SizeOf(Char) for your UnicodeString. SizeOf(AnsiChar)/SizeOf(Char) is also a lot faster, easier to read and understand and shorter to write. –  Andreas Hausladen Apr 1 '10 at 5:30
    
I put StringElementSize in just for a sanity check to give myself some assurance that I was not completely off-base expecting to see a unicode string formatted with two bytes per character. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 5:40
    
Thank you all for your help. The code that Serg provided makes the solution clear. While my migration to unicode has mostly been pretty easy, there are still some things that will take extra study and work. Thanks again. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What is the type of the oStringStream.WriteString's parameter? If it is AnsiString, you have an implicit conversion from Unicode to Ansi and that explains your example.


Updated: Now the real question is how TStringStream stores data internally. In the following code sample (Delphi 2009)

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  S: string;
  SS: TStringStream;

begin
  S:= 'asdfg';
  SS:= TStringStream.Create(S);  // 1 byte per char
  SS.WriteString('321');
  Label1.Caption:= SS.DataString;
  SS.Free;
end;

TStringStream uses internally the default system ANSI encoding (1 byte per char). The constructor and WriteString procedures convert a string argument from unicode to ANSI.

To override this behaviour you must declare the encoding explicitely in the constructor:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  S: string;
  SS: TStringStream;

begin
  S:= 'asdfg';
  SS:= TStringStream.Create(S, TEncoding.Unicode);  // 2 bytes per char
  SS.WriteString('321');
  Label1.Caption:= SS.DataString;
  SS.Free;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
sBuffer is declared as: var sBuffer: UnicodeString; –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 4:11

The stream format largely depends on the TStringStream.Encoding. In your exemple, the used codepage should be the same as sBuffer (See implentation from TStringStream.Create).

Since oStringStream.WriteString(sUnicodeStream); seems to save as single bytes, I'd assume sBuffer is an Ansistring or a RawByteString.

Now... why do the reading fails... You have yet to supply us an example of how you do read back in that stream.

share|improve this answer
    
So, like me, you expect that if sUnicodeStream is declared as a UnicodeString, you would see a string composed of two bytes per character. If you try out my newly edited example code you will see that it apparently does not work that way. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 5:45
    
Serg is right... TStringStream only check the codepage in the ansistring version. –  Ken Bourassa Apr 1 '10 at 13:45

I think you want to use:

LoadFromStream(stream, TEncoding.ASCII);

If your single byte text is not ASCII but is based on a code page, then this might work:

LoadFromStream(stream, TEncoding.GetEncoding(1252));

where the "1252" is the code page that your single byte text is based on.

share|improve this answer
    
The LoadFromStream is a method of AdvStringrid from TMS. It only takes one parameter. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 4:17
    
I don't use TMS, but maybe TMS's TTntStringGrid which is in their Unicode Component Pack may be able to do it for you. See: tmssoftware.com/site/tmsuni.asp Otherwise, I'd recommend you contact TMS and tell them your problem, and they may add the 2nd parameter to their LoadFromStream to make it Delphi 2009+ Unicode compatible. –  lkessler Apr 1 '10 at 4:26
    
This does not appear to be a problem with the grid. Please see my edits to my original post. It does not appear that casting an AnsiString to unicode changes the internal formatting of the string. –  jrodenhi Apr 1 '10 at 5:27
    
It's the whole TEncoding system that they added into Delphi that is designed to handle that exact problem, so that the casting will be correct. So maybe a solution for you is to load your stream into another stream using the encoding that works, and then load that into your AdvStringrid. –  lkessler Apr 1 '10 at 13:19

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