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I have many folders in a directory with content inside them. How can I quickly see when they have been modified? My list of folders is large, so I want to do this programmatically. But want to get the results in text format. I can copy and paste from cmd if necessary. and also when a folder was last entered (like touch or something)?

So I would like to see the folder name, modification date, and last time the folder was entered such as:

file1  modified-date  touch-date
file2  modified-date  touch-date
file3  modified-date  touch-date
.
.

Is there a Windows command line command or other native Windows way to easily do this?

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what do you mean by "see"? Is this something you want to do from code, or using Windows and typing and clicking things? –  Kate Gregory Aug 29 '14 at 18:52
    
My list of folders is large, so I want to do this programmatically. But want to get the results in text format. I can copy and paste from CMD if necessary. –  brno792 Aug 29 '14 at 18:56
1  
Are you comfortable with writing Powershell? –  rrirower Aug 29 '14 at 19:16

2 Answers 2

If you go into powershell by typing powershell at a command line or in search box.

For sorting by modified date

Get-ChildItem c:\ | Sort-Object LastWriteTime | Select-Object Name, 
LastWriteTime, LastAccessTime

For sorting by accessed date

Get-ChildItem c:\ | Sort-Object LastAccessTime | Select-Object Name, 
LastWriteTime, LastAccessTime

And you can send any to a file with the following after the end. Replace path and file with your own.

>> c:\path\file.text

Just make sure if writing files you run powershell as an administrator.

CreationDate is another option for objects to list or sort by.

You can also use -descending or - ascending after your Sort-Object Object to sort in different orders, ascending by default.

Also, if you only want folders include the where right after the get-childItem like so

Get-ChildItem C:\ | where {$_.PsIsContainer} | Sort-Object LastAccessTime | 
Select-Object Name, LastWriteTime, LastAccessTime
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First a caveat:

Since Vista, the default setting for the NTFS file system (redundant FS is redundant) is to not update the last access time because of performance reasons (adds a write to every read). You can change it if you like, by issuing this command at an elevated prompt: fsutil behavior set DisableLastAccess 0.

Using pure DOS commands in a batch file:

@echo off
for /f "usebackq tokens=*" %%i in (`dir /ad /s /b`) do (
    for /f "usebackq tokens=1-3" %%j in (`dir /ad /ta "%%i" ^| find "<DIR>" ^| find " ." ^| find /v ".."`) do echo %%j %%k %%l  %%i
)

Not a sortable date format granted, but it'll give you all directories and last accessed timestamp (that's what the /ta does). There's a tab character between the %%l and %%i in the echo line.

Breakdown: get all the directories /ad recursively /s with only the path displayed /b. For each such line, get the directory contents with last accessed timestamp /ta. We only want the line with <DIR> in it that's the current directory (single dot). Has to be a bit complex to avoid the parent .. entry but that's batch for you.

You could reformat the date into yyyy-mm-dd format for sorting with this instead of the echo above:

... do (set x=%%j & echo %x:~6,4%-%x:~0,2%-%x:~3,2% %%k %%l %%i)

That assumes mm/dd/yyyy original date format of course; modify the %x slice'n'dice according to your needs. Time isn't included because the DIR command returns an AM/PM value instead of 24 hours and we'd need to use a subroutine call to do that much logic.

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I'm not sure that /ta works as expected. In Windows 8 I used dir /ta and a folder showed 13:45 - after CD to the folder and cd back out of the folder it still showed 13:45 (which was an hour ago). –  foxidrive Aug 31 '14 at 4:36
    
Since Vista, the default setting for the NTFS file system (redundant FS is redundant) is to not update that because of performance reasons. You can change it if you like, by issuing this command at an elevated prompt: fsutil behavior set DisableLastAccess 0 –  Torqane Sep 1 '14 at 5:56
    
Thanks for the info. It should also be noted clearly before your answer - to save someone trying it on a default system and wondering why it doesn't work. –  foxidrive Sep 1 '14 at 6:35
    
Thanks @foxidrive, answer modified accordingly. –  Torqane Sep 2 '14 at 21:46

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