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I'd like to create a database model where every customer must have at least 3 e-mails.

The first idea is to model it as follows (I will use MySQL syntax):

create table customer (
  id int not null auto_increment primary key,
  ...
  text e-mail1 not null,
  text e-mail2 not null,
  text e-mail3 not null);

create table customer_emails(
    id int not null auto_increment primary key, 
    text e-mail
    ...
    foreign key (customer_id) references customer(id));

You can notice that in this model there is a possibility for data redundancy.

Let's assume an example we want to insert a customer having 5 e-mails (e1, e2, e3, e4, e5) into the database. Three e-mails (e1, e2, e3) will be certainly inserted into table customer. Now, we have 2 possibilities.

  1. insert e4, e5 to customer_emails
  2. insert e1, e2, e3, e4, e5 to customer_emails

What is better approach and why? 1 (no redundancy) or 2 (with redundancy)?

share|improve this question
1  
Those aren't the things that can be reasonably implemented structurally, as you have probably noticed. Creating foreign key fields only to proof some 2nd order business rule is IMHO not a good idea. Such things are best controlled by triggers. – Danubian Sailor Sep 3 '14 at 7:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second option is better. However in your case, all customer emails should be stored in customer_emails regardless of if they have 3 or 25.

If you have multiple emails that a customer can have, you should not store any of them in the customer table. Instead store all of them in the customer_emails table. Get rid of the e-mail1, e-mail2, e-mail3. It would be confusing to have to get three emails from the customer table and the rest from another table.

Image how you would get all of the emails for a particular customer in scenario 1:

SELECT c.id, c.email1, c.email2, c.email3, ce.email
FROM customer c
INNER JOIN customer_emails ce on ce.customer_id = c.id
WHERE id = 67

The above would return:

c.id  c.email1     c.email2     c.email3    ce.email  
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm4.com
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm5.com
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm6.com
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm7.com
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm8.com
67    ed@mm1.com   ed@mm2.com   ed@mm3.com  ed@mm9.com

Now think about this, scenario 2:

SELECT c.id, ce.email
FROM customer c
INNER JOIN customer_emails ce on ce.customer_id = c.id
WHERE id = 67

would return:

c.id  ce.email
67    ed@mm1.com
67    ed@mm2.com
67    ed@mm3.com
67    ed@mm4.com
67    ed@mm5.com
67    ed@mm6.com
67    ed@mm7.com
67    ed@mm8.com
67    ed@mm9.com

The second option is much easier/cleaner to deal with since all the email addresses are in one field.

share|improve this answer
    
If you store e-mails only in the customer_emails table, can you enforce that three of them will not be null by the MySQL DB, or is the only possibility to do it in PHP code? – xralf Aug 29 '14 at 20:26
    
You would have to do that in your PHP code. Just curious, why would you force them to enter three email addresses? Isn't 1 enough? Anyway, it should be pretty easy to do on the front end. Just provide 3 text boxes for the email addresses that have to be filled in before the record can be saved. – Linger Aug 29 '14 at 20:28
    
This is requirement (integrity constraint). I would like somehow define it in MySQL to check after inserting new customer that it has three e-mails. It should not happen that I have in the DB customer record and for this record only 2 e-mails in customer_emails table. – xralf Aug 29 '14 at 20:36
    
what is your front end application? – Linger Aug 29 '14 at 20:37
1  
The only way it is possible to force the three email addresses in MySQL is by using your first option. Storing the first 3 3mail addresses in customer and the rest of them in customer_emails. However, your queries will just be a little uglier and out of the norm. – Linger Aug 29 '14 at 21:05

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