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I'm struggling with reading characters from console in c++. Here is what I tried to do:

char x;
char y; 
char z;

cout<<"Please enter your string: ";
string s;
getline(cin,s);
istringstream is(s);

is>> x >> y >> z;

The problem is if the user enter something like this "1 20 100":

x will get 1
y will get 2
z will get 0

What I want to get is x = 1; y = 20; z = 100;

Anybody has suggestions?

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char {x|y|z} -> int {x|y|z} –  CyberSpock Apr 1 '10 at 1:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't want to read characters but integers.

int x;
int y; 
int z;

cout<<"Please enter your string: ";
string s;
getline(cin,s);
istringstream is(s);

is>> x >> y >> z;
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I want to read by character because i want to save memory. Character takes only 1 byte (which is good enough for my program) vs integer 4 bytes. –  root Apr 1 '10 at 1:36
    
So when you want z = 100, but want z to be a character, what do you mean? Do you mean ascii character 100? –  Justin Ardini Apr 1 '10 at 1:39
3  
@tsubasa We understand. We're saying it's not worth the hassle. This is what's called "premature optimization". You are causing yourself a an unnecessary headache and making your code confusing to save a few bytes that don't matter. –  Tyler McHenry Apr 1 '10 at 1:45
1  
the string s takes more than 12 bytes –  sisis Apr 1 '10 at 1:45
1  
@tsubasa: Why do you feel the need to save such tiny space? If any, the compiler might pad some stack variables for alignment anyway. string dynamically allocates, takes up a bit more space, streams in general aren't afraid to use stack variables, etc. –  GManNickG Apr 1 '10 at 1:46

You're nearly there. operator>>() is the formatted extraction operator. Change the variables from type char to type int and you're good to go.

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It sounds like you want to read in integers. You could do:

int x, y, z;

cout << "Please enter three integers: ";
cin >> x >> y >> z;
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The reason you are getting those results is that since x,y and z are chars, when you use istringstream it reads the first character into x, it skips the space and reads the character '2' into y and the next character is '0' and that goes into z.

char x, y, z;
cout << "Please enter three integers: ";
cin >> x >> y >> z;

If that doesn't work, just use ints because trying to find a workaround to use chars instead of ints to save memory is worrying about the wrong thing here.

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