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In many programming competitions I have seen people write this type of for-loop

for(i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++)

Unless I am missing something, that's the same as

for(i = 0; i < 128; i++)

Why use the (1 << 7) version?
Isn't calculating the condition every time an unnecessary overhead?

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12  
C has a thing called "the as-if rule" (well - not exactly; C++ has that, and C has equivalent text but doesn't call it that specific name): what's important is that the program produces the same output as what your code outputs. ("output" includes accesses to volatile variables, and calls to library functions). Other than that, it can do what it likes. If you wrote a program to generate prime numbers, the compiler could detect that and just hardcode a list of prime numbers in the executable. In your code, all compilers would hardcode 128 rather than doing a shift at runtime. –  Matt McNabb Aug 30 at 12:16
4  
Maybe not all people know the powers of 2 between 2^0 and 2^32 by heart. (Although, admittedly, I think that a programmer should at least know them up to 2^16, and some "interpolation points" like 2^20, 2^24, 2^30 and 2^32 itself...) –  Marco13 Aug 30 at 23:43
12  
@harrythomas: Writing 128 will make it look as a "magic constant" of unexplainable origin. Writing (1 << 7) might makes it immediately clear what that constant stands for and where it came from. It is preferable to do it that way. –  AndreyT Aug 31 at 1:46
11  
Both versions are bad. It should be for(i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_STEPS; i++). Don't use magic numbers. –  glampert Aug 31 at 1:46
5  
@LukaHorvat: Then write for(i = 0; i < ONE_HUNDRED_TWENTY_EIGHT; i++). I call this a magic constant!. –  rodrigo Aug 31 at 19:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Yes, they are equivalent in behavior.

Then why do people use the (1 << 7) version?

I guess, they use it to document it is a power of 2.

Calculating the condition every time must be an overhead! I am unable to find the reason behind this!

Not really, any normal compiler will replace 1 << 7 by 128 and so both loops will have the same performances.

(C11, 6.6p2) "A constant expression can be evaluated during translation rather than runtime, and accordingly may be used in any place that a constant may be."

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20  
Note that the C language requires the compiler to be able to evaluate constant expressions at compile-time, since they're usable in all sorts of contexts where the actual value must be known, either to determine constraint violations (e.g. negative array size or invalid bitfield widths) or expression types (due to the fact that whether an expression is a null pointer constant depends on the value, and the result can propagate in very powerful ways via the ?: operator). Thus there's no good reason not to evaluate all constant expressions fully at compile-time. –  R.. Aug 31 at 5:37
    
@R.. excellent point –  ouah Aug 31 at 10:24
1  
@Echelon: the preprocessor is just able to recognize preprocessor tokens and perform string substitution. Besides that, it has no knowledge of the C/C++ syntax and semantics. –  Yves Daoust Sep 3 at 6:31
1  
@YvesDaoust @Echelon Note that preprocessor constant expression is a different class of constant expression. Preprocessor arithmetic is done using the largest integer type in the target (intmax_t or uintmax_t). An #if controlling constant expression (e.g., in #if 1 << 7 == 128) is required to be evaluated at preprocessor time (more specifically at translation phase 4). –  ouah Sep 3 at 11:56
1  
@Echelon: I just had a look at an intermediate preprocessor output (Visual Studio compiler), and no constant is substituted in the source code. Could a preprocessor perform valid literal constant substitution without knowing the whole language syntax ? –  Yves Daoust Sep 4 at 7:38

Let's translate each one of these options into plain English:

for(i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++) // For every possible combination of 7 bits
for(i = 0; i < 128; i++)      // For every number between 0 and 127

Runtime behavior should be identical in both cases.

In fact, assuming a decent compiler, even the assembly code should be identical.

So the first option is essentially used just in order to "make a statement".

You could just as well use the second option and add a comment above.

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1  
An even better statement would be a more appropriate name for i. i tends to mean something like "the index I'm working on", but the programmer is trying to say "the pattern I'm working on". Something like bitCombo would make it clear without the comment. Contests tend to emphasize being short and clever over clear though, so maybe they stuck with i for the mystique. –  Mirinth Aug 31 at 16:56

1 << 7 is a constant expression, the compiler treats it like 128, there's no overhead in run time.

Without the loop body, it's hard to say why the author uses it. Possibly it's a loop that iterates something associated with 7 bits, but that's just my guess.

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3  
Thanks..yup the for loop I was looking at is working with 7 bits! Thanks! –  harrythomas Aug 30 at 12:10
2  
Yeah. I do this if it helps with understanding. I call them 'biterators' :) –  Martin James Aug 30 at 12:53

Then why do people use the (1 << 7) version?

It is a form of documentation, it is not a magic number but 2^7(two to the seventh power) which is meaningful to whomever wrote the code. A modern optimizing compiler should generate the exact same code for both examples and so there is no cost to using this form and there is a benefit of adding context.

Using godbolt we can verify this is indeed the case, at least for several versions of gcc, clang and icc. Using a simple example with side effects to ensure that the code is not totally optimized away:

#include <stdio.h>

void forLoopShift()
{
  for(int i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++)
  {
    printf("%d ", i ) ;
  }
}

void forLoopNoShift()
{
  for(int i = 0; i < 128; i++)
  {
        printf("%d ", i ) ;
  }
}

For the relevant part of the code we can see they both generate the following see it live:

cmpl    $128, %ebx

What we have is an integer constant expression as defined in the draft C11 standard section 6.6 Constant expressions which says:

An integer constant expression117) shall have integer type and shall only have operands that are integer constants, enumeration constants, character constants, sizeof expressions whose results are integer constants,[...]

and:

Constant expressions shall not contain assignment, increment, decrement, function-call, or comma operators, except when they are contained within a subexpression that is not evaluated.115)

and we can see that a constant expression is allowed to be evaluated during translation:

A constant expression can be evaluated during translation rather than runtime, and accordingly may be used in any place that a constant may be.

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But what's that magic number 7 ? :-) –  Yves Daoust Sep 3 at 6:32
2  
+1 for the godbolt link - that's awesome. –  Rory Hunter Sep 3 at 8:35
    
@YvesDaoust well the OP did say it was for a programming contest –  Shafik Yaghmour Sep 3 at 9:26
1  
Then it is probably the value of (1 << ((1 << (1 << 1)) - 1)) - 1, where 1 is a magic number. –  Yves Daoust Sep 3 at 9:32

for(i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++)

and

for(i = 0; i < 128; i++)

gives same performance but developer can take huge advantage in case for(i = 0; i < (1 << 7); i++) is used in a loop as

for(int k = 0; k < 8; k++)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < (1 << k); i++)
   {
    //your code
    }

}

Now it is in the inner loop upper limit i.e. (1 << k) changes with power of 2 runtime. But it is applicable if your algorithm requires this logic.

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2  
(1 << k) is a loop invariant so the compiler should calculate it only once per outer loop iteration. In fact, it may perform induction variable elimination, converting this to for (int j = 1; j <= 128; j <<= 1) for (i = 0; i < j; i++) { ... } –  Zack Aug 30 at 13:59

The compiler outputs the same code for both cases. you probably want to use different forms depending on the context.

  1. You can use NUM_STEPS or NUM_ELEMENTS_IN_NETWORK_PACKET when it's a constant part or a design choice in your algorithm that you want to make clear.
  2. Or you can write 128, to make clear it's 128, a constant.
  3. Or write 1 << 7 if you're at a competition and the test said something like "run it 2^7 times".

Or, you can be showing off that you know bit operations!

In my humble opinion, programming is like writing a letter for two people, the compiler and the person that will have to read it. What you're meaning should be clear for both.

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"programming is like writing a letter for two people, the compiler and the person that will have to read it" -- I really like that. :-D –  Th3Minstr3l Sep 4 at 13:47
    
There was never a program written that was understood by a person and not a computer. A program should always be written readable for other (people). Computer will always understand it anyway (given - of course - it is valid syntax) –  hashier Sep 4 at 16:55

It's evaluated by the preprocessor since both operands are constant.

But if you're going to use the number instead of the bit shift shouldn't it be 0x0100?

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3  
-1. The preprocessor doesn't evaluate C code. –  a3f Sep 3 at 9:26

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