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I want to use ambiguous type a in function as follows, but it fails.

foo :: (Read a, Show a) => IO ()
foo = print =<< (readLn :: IO a)

The purpose is to get different outputs regarding to the given type signature when actually called.

>>> foo :: Double => IO ()
34   -- user input
34.0 -- output

>>> foo :: Int => IO ()
34   -- user input
34   -- output

How can I manage this?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I changed the sample function. – user3749167 Aug 30 '14 at 16:00
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The simplest way is to manifest your type variable. For example, using a newish GHC:

{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}
foo :: forall proxy a. (Read a, Show a) => proxy a -> IO ()
foo _ = print (read "34" :: a)

Then, in ghci:

Data.Proxy *Main> foo (Proxy :: Proxy Double)
34.0
Data.Proxy *Main> foo (Proxy :: Proxy Int)
34

Or, a more exotic usage, relying on more implicit Haskell behavior:

*Main> foo [0.0]
34.0
*Main> foo [0]
34
share|improve this answer
    
ScopedTypeVariables is what I wanted! Thanks. – user3749167 Aug 30 '14 at 15:53
    
Note that you can do this without ScopedTypeVariables, e.g. define asProxyTypeOf :: a -> proxy a -> a; asProxyTypeOf = const and then write foo p = print (read "34" `asProxyTypeOf` p). – shachaf Aug 30 '14 at 20:08
    
And with SignatureSections you can write foo (:: Int) 34. – augustss Aug 30 '14 at 23:56

Neither foo :: Double => IO () nor foo :: Int => IO () are valid signatures, since Double and Int aren't constraints.

However, you could easily make the function polymorphic in its return type and write it the following way:

foo :: (Read a, Show a) => IO a
foo = let x = read "34" in print x >> return x

That way, you can use foo :: IO Double or foo :: IO Integer:

ghci> foo :: IO Double
34.0 -- print
34.0 -- result, you would discard it
ghci> foo :: IO Integer
34
34
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but It's not I intended to do. The type should be IO () – user3749167 Aug 30 '14 at 15:52
    
@user3749167: That's easily fixable with void (foo :: ...). The other variant would be ScopedTypeVariables, as Daniel said. – Zeta Aug 30 '14 at 15:56
    
My actual function is far more complicated, and it can't be resolved with void. Thanks a lot! – user3749167 Aug 30 '14 at 16:01

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