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The Test3.java:

public class Test3 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new A();
    }
}

class A extends B {

    A() {
        System.out.println("Now in A()");
    }

    void m() {
        System.out.println("Now in m() of A");
    }
}

class B {
    B() {
        System.out.println("Now in B()");
        m();
    }

    void m() {
        System.out.println("Now in m() of B");
    }
}

The output:

    $ java Test3
Now in B()
Now in m() of A
Now in A()

Why not "Now in m() of B" in the 2nd line of output?

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1  
C++ and Java are two different languages and have slightly different rules for polymorphism. I suggest you read a book or tutorial about inheritence and polymorphism. This question has already been answered multiple times. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 1:56
    
@Code-Apprentice What does this have to do with C++? Also, if it's been answered before, then mark it as a duplicate... –  Anubian Noob Aug 31 '14 at 2:04
    
@AnubianNoob What it has do with C++ is that in C++ the code would behave as the OP expects. –  EJP Aug 31 '14 at 2:10
1  
Note that in the above code A is the subclass, B is the superclass -- contrary to your title. –  Hot Licks Aug 31 '14 at 2:12
    
@AnubianNoob The OP originally tagged this as both "java" and "C++". (See the edit history.) In particular, the default binding of a member function/method is different in these two languages. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because the method m is overriden in A. So when it goes to the super constructor, and calls m, the object is still an instance of A, so it calls the method in A.

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Because methods in Java are virtual by default, if you using Java 6 or higher, it is recommended that you use the @Override annotation, it makes things clearer.

The first question is: Why the first line was

Now in B()

The reason is: When you can extend a class in Java a call to the super constructor will be done automatically for you by the compiler

A() {
    super(); // added by Java !!
    System.out.println("Now in A()");
}

So, now we are in B's constructor

B() {
    System.out.println("Now in B()"); // print this
    m(); // Ohh hang on, m() is overridden
}

because m() is overriden by the subclass A, and the actual instance is of type A, so we will call A's implementation of m(), and that is a polymorphic call.

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1  
Much better explained than me, +1. –  Anubian Noob Aug 31 '14 at 2:13

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