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I am trying to have a Node which has a variable with type T, T data; along with storing pointers to its parent node NodeBase *parent;.

The classes look as such:

class Node: public NodeBase {
    T data;
    NodeBase *parent;
public:
    Node(T);
    void setData(T);
    T * getData(void);
    void setParent(NodeBase * const);
    NodeBase * getParent(void);
};

class NodeBase {
};

I thought that I could put a pure virtual function in NodeBase, but you have to specify the return type, and since NodeBase does not have a type I cannot specify virtual T * getData(void) = 0;

The specific case that I am having issues with:

Node<char> n1 = Node('A');
Node<int>  n2 = Node(63);
n1.setParent(&n2);

NodeBase *pNode = n1.getParent();
pNode->getData(); // Error: BaseNode has no member 'getData()'
share|improve this question
    
getData would have to be a virtual memeber function of nodebase - and more importantly it would have to have a known type, so that evey call to NodeBase* p; p->getData(); would return the same type –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 2:21
1  
Can you make NodeBase a template class? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:23
    
Also, what is the purpose of NodeBase? Will you have multiple implementations of it? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:24
    
@Code-Apprentice ie curiously recurring template pattern? that's a good/idiomatic solution, but OP needs to understand that two Nodes of different type can't be treated as having the same base type. –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 2:24
    
@user3125280 OIC...the OP wants a common base class for both Node<char> and Node<int>. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could add a templated function to NodeBase:

class NodeBase {
    public:
       template<typename T>
       T* getData();
};

Which would cast the object into Node<T> and return getData(). Here's a working example - included only cause it actually took me a while to fix problems with cyclic definitions:

class NodeBase {
    public:
    template<typename T>
    T* getData();
};

template<typename T>
class Node: public NodeBase {
    T data;
    NodeBase *parent;

protected:  
    friend NodeBase;
    T * getData(void){return &data;};

public:
    Node(T var){data=var;};
    void setData(T& var){data=var;};
    void setParent(NodeBase * const par){parent=par;};
    NodeBase * getParent(void){return parent;};
};

template<typename T>
T* NodeBase::getData(){ return dynamic_cast<Node<T>*>(this)->getData();};


int main(){
    Node<char> n1 = Node<char>('A');
    Node<int>  n2 = Node<int>(63);
    n1.setParent(&n2);

    NodeBase *pNode = n1.getParent();
    std::cout << *pNode->getData<int>() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
but if OP knew data pNode's type at call site, all he would of needed is a cast... this is not type safe except in the trivial case. what does this code do that a cast doesn't? –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 5:43
    
@user3125280 it hides the logic in a class and requires (not only lets, but requires) the user to actually say what type he needs. From my knowledge - it's as type safe as a cast, so its peculiar you're mentioning both things in one comment. Could you elaborate? I see your answer below, but I can't see why typeid couldn't be applied here, making it as safe? –  Paweł Stawarz Aug 31 '14 at 14:12
    
Polymorphism means that code can be written agnostic to the underlying type of the object - either by querying the type (typeid) or ignoring it (virtual). for example OP want's to be able to recover the data stored in the underlying type - but can't always know it's type. does your answer address this? how would you write a function that got passed an arbitrary NodeBase*? see an example here typeid isn't (IMHO) part of the solution, to be tacked on afterwards "for safety". it is the solution. this is why it exists. –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 15:37
    
also reinterpret cast is plain wrong here "reinterpret_cast cannot be used to convert between pointers to two different classes that are related by inheritance" - easily fixed though –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 15:42
    
@user3125280 "for example OP want's to be able to recover the data stored in the underlying type - but can't always know it's type. does your answer address this?" I think the OP knows best what he needs. Since this is the accepted answer now, I guess this is what he needed. You're right about the reinterpret_cast tho. Gonna change it ASAP. –  Paweł Stawarz Aug 31 '14 at 20:50

I believe you are confusing run-time polymorphism with compile-time polymorphism. Templates provide the later. One possible solution to your problem is to make NodeBase a template class:

template <class T>
class NodeBase {
    public:
        virtual T getData() = 0;
};

template <class T>
class Node : NodeBase<T> {
    T data;
    NodeBase *parent;

public:
    Node(T);
    void setData(T);
    T getData(void);
    void setParent(NodeBase<T> * const);
    NodeBase<T> * getParent(void);
};

Note that I made getData return T rather than T*. (Is there a reason to return a pointer?)

share|improve this answer
    
The issue with this is Node cannot have NodeBase *parent where the parent is of a different type than the specific Node. For instance, Node<int> could not have a parent of Node<char>. –  MichaelMitchell Aug 31 '14 at 2:39
    
@MichaelMitchell Exactly. I don't think there is a way to do what you want because the signature of getData() depends on the argument to your template class. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:42
    
@MichaelMitchell So are you saying that you want to store both chars and ints in the same list? Can you provide a use-case for this? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:45
    
No, those were just random cases, I need a solution that works for many types. –  MichaelMitchell Aug 31 '14 at 2:45
    
@MichaelMitchell Can you provide a concrete example? For instance, by "many types", do you mean "many built-in types" or "many user-defined types"? (For the later, you can create an inheritance hierarchy.) –  Code-Apprentice Aug 31 '14 at 2:50

C++ is statically typed, so everytime you write code like this:

NodeBase *pNode = n1.getParent();
pNode->getData(); // Error: BaseNode has no member 'getData()'

the compiler needs to know the type of getData(). In your case, you want it to be either int(void) or char(void) - functions with no arguments returning char or int.

There are ways around this. The strategy will depend on your situation. There are a few cases for the return type:

  • A fixed set of bultins - use a union
  • A fix set of builtins or classes, but the type will never be changed - use a union
  • A fix set of builtins or classes, but the type may change - use boost variant
  • Any other case - use boost any

So in summary, add a virtual function to the base class (non-templated) that returns one of the above data structures. The documentation for boost is easy to find online.

The reason why this is so much more difficult in c++ is because other languages (especially dynamic languages) hide the difficulty. When a function call is made, space is allocated - typically on the stack for the best speed - and the return value is copied into that space. If you want to return an unknown type you need to either make the maximum space available of all possible return types (a union, maybe boost variant?) or allocate that space from the heap (boost any). Many statically typed languages provide good support only for the former.

C++ does have some helpful features if you want to do it yourself.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

struct NodeBase {
    virtual ~NodeBase(){}
};

template<typename T>
struct Node: public NodeBase {
    T data;
    NodeBase *parent;

    Node(T data, NodeBase* parent = nullptr)
        : data(data), parent(parent)
    {}

    ~Node(){}
};

int main()
{
    Node<int>  n2(63);
    Node<char> n1('A', &n2);

    NodeBase* b = n1.parent; //pointer to n2

    if(typeid(*b) == typeid(Node<int>))
        cout << ((Node<int>*) b)->data << endl;

    return 0;
}

Note that typeinfo and at least one virtual function in NodeBase are required for this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
I am more interested in learning how to rather than using a library, but now I have a place to look, thank you. –  MichaelMitchell Aug 31 '14 at 3:41
    
@MichaelMitchell in that case, ill add an example with the typeid operator –  user3125280 Aug 31 '14 at 3:47
NodeBase *pNode = n1.getParent();
pNode->getData(); // Error: BaseNode has no member 'getData()'

You have pNode (child), so you can use directly to getData(), secondly your base class know nothing about getData(), so using upcasted pointer you cannot call it.

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