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Does anyone know how to bind a Yes/No radio button to a boolean property of a Strongly Typed Model in ASP.NET MVC.

Model

public class MyClass
{
     public bool Blah { get; set; }
}

View

<%@  Page Title="blah"  Inherits="MyClass"%>
    <dd>
        <%= Html.RadioButton("blah", Model.blah) %> Yes
        <%= Html.RadioButton("blah", Model.blah) %> No
    </dd>

Thanks

SOLUTION:

Thanks for Brian for the direction but it was the opposite of what he wrote. As so -

<%@  Page Title="blah"  Inherits="MyClass"%>
<dd>
    <%= Html.RadioButton("blah", !Model.blah) %> Yes
    <%= Html.RadioButton("blah", Model.blah) %> No
</dd>
share|improve this question
2  
The "problem" with these solutions (and I'm using the Ben Cull style in my project) is that you can't do labels with them. Both radio button inputs will have the same id and name, so if you you use Html.LabelFor, it will link to the first radio button input in the DOM with that id. Like I said, I'm using this solutions for radio buttons to represent a boolean field, I just wanted people to know that labels will be a bit wonky. –  Gromer Dec 19 '11 at 18:44
2  
See Jeff Bobish's answer to see how to fix the label issue elegantly. –  René Dec 17 '12 at 14:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The second parameter is selected, so use the ! to select the no value when the boolean is false.

<%= Html.RadioButton("blah", !Model.blah) %> Yes 
<%= Html.RadioButton("blah", Model.blah) %> No 
share|improve this answer

If you're using MVC 3 and Razor you can also use the following:

@Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, true) Yes
@Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, false) No
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Here is a more complete example using a fieldset for accessibility reasons and specifying the first button as the default. Without a fieldset, what the radio buttons are for as a whole can not be programmatically determined.

Model

public class MyModel
{
    public bool IsMarried { get; set; }
}

View

<fieldset>
    <legend>Married</legend>

    @Html.RadioButtonFor(e => e.IsMarried, true, new { id = "married-true" })
    @Html.Label("married-true", "Yes")

    @Html.RadioButtonFor(e => e.IsMarried, false, new { id = "married-false" })
    @Html.Label("married-false", "No")
</fieldset>

You can add a @checked argument to the anonymous object to set the radio button as the default:

new { id = "married-true", @checked = 'checked' }

Note that you can bind to a string by replacing true and false with the string values.

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It is a correct answer. Thanks! –  Clark Kent Aug 27 at 17:34

Building slightly off Ben's answer, I added attributes for the ID so I could use labels.

<%: Html.Label("isBlahYes", "Yes")%><%= Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, true, new { @id = "isBlahYes" })%>
<%: Html.Label("isBlahNo", "No")%><%= Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, false, new { @id = "isBlahNo" })%>

I hope this helps.

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7  
Normally the label is after a radio button. –  Daniel Imms Jun 5 '12 at 22:20
1  
Putting a label around a radio button is perfectly valid. –  ScottSEA Feb 24 at 0:36

Adding label tags around the radio buttons using regular HTML will fix the 'labelfor' issue as well:

<label><%= Html.RadioButton("blah", !Model.blah) %> Yes</label>
<label><%= Html.RadioButton("blah", Model.blah) %> No</label>

Clicking on the text now selects the appropriate radio button.

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or MVC 2.0:

<%= Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, true) %> Yes
<%= Html.RadioButtonFor(model => model.blah, false) %> No
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