Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The XML character set is limited to the following:

[\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\x{D7FF}\x{E000}-\x{FFFD}\x{10000}-\x{10FFFF}]

Entities may not be used to represent characters outside this set either.

I am parsing some XML data files from an external source using XML::DOM. Some of the XML files have non-printable characters encoded in the form of &#xx; (eg. ) which is causing the parser to crash as these are invalid. I am trying to find an easy way to remove these invalid characters. I have tried

$xml =~ s/(&#\c\c;)//g;

which doesn't seem to work. SO doesn't seem to have anything related and I have been searching online for a while with no success.

share|improve this question
1  
You were going for $xml =~ s/(&#..;)//g;, but that's hardly a sufficient general solution as it fails to remove  and , etc. Also, it removes valid characters 
 and 
. –  ikegami Aug 31 at 15:07
1  
Oh, and using a regex like that will break the contents of CDATA section. –  ikegami Aug 31 at 15:18
    
@ikegami, yes that is true. In my case the CDATA section should not be containing any of these, so I am safe in removing all of them. –  Rasika Aug 31 at 15:23
    
What about  (should be removed),  (should be removed), � (should be removed) and &#x0A (shouldn't be removed)? –  ikegami Aug 31 at 15:27
    
I'm not exactly sure what you intended, but \c doesn't do what you want. It's not a regex character class, but regexes are first processed as double-quoted strings where \cA, for example, is the single character control-A, or "\x{01}. So "\c\c" is control-backslash followed by a small letter c. A backslash has a character code of 0x5C, so control-backslash is 0x1C and your regex /(&#\c\c;)/ will match "&#\x{1C}c;". Were you looking for something to match a single character? In which case a dot . is closer to your intention –  Borodin Aug 31 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

I would try using \w instead of \c.

The following produces the correct results for me:

my $xml = <<XML;
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> 
<outer>
  <inner>&#15;</inner>
</outer>
XML

$xml =~ s/&#\w{2};//g;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the \w did the trick. Also, I had missed out the x in the string. The actual regex is $xml =~ s/&#x\{2};//g; –  Rasika Aug 31 at 15:17
    
The \w character class includes uppder and lower case English letters, digits, and the underscore _. It's not clear exactly which character entities should be removed, but they certainly won't contain underscores. –  Borodin Aug 31 at 18:00
    
@Rasika: This answer may fulfil your needs but it doesn't answer the question, which is to "replace non-printable characters". This replaces any entity that happens to contain two characters, including the x for hex entities. If you want to remove all numeric entities then you can write s/&#(?:[0-9]+|x\p{Ahex}+);//g –  Borodin Sep 2 at 11:58

I would recommending explicitly specifying which characters that you want to remove.

The following removes the unprintable character entities in the ascii range. This could easily be expanded if you wanted to cover all of the unprintable entities as you've defined them.

Also, please note as @ikegami mentioned in the question comments that using a regex like this will break the contents of CDATA section.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = do {local $/; <DATA>};

# Allowed entities:
# [\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\x{D7FF}\x{E000}-\x{FFFD}\x{10000}-\x{10FFFF}]

# Decimal Character Entities
$data =~ s/&#0*(?!(?:9|1[03])\b)(?:[12]?[0-9]|3[01]);//g;

# Hex Character Entities
$data =~ s/&#x0*(?![9ADad]\b)1?[[:xdigit:]];//g;

print $data;

__DATA__
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> 
<root>
    <hex_character_entities>
        <hex00>&#x00;&#x01;&#x02;&#x03;&#x04;&#x05;&#x06;&#x07;&#x08;&#x09;&#x0A;&#x0B;&#x0C;&#x0D;&#x0E;&#x0F;</hex00>
        <hex10>&#x10;&#x11;&#x12;&#x13;&#x14;&#x15;&#x16;&#x17;&#x18;&#x19;&#x1A;&#x1B;&#x1C;&#x1D;&#x1E;&#x1F;</hex10>
        <hex20>&#x20;&#x21;...</hex20>
    </hex_character_entities>
    <decimal_character_entities>
        <dec00>&#00;&#01;&#02;&#03;&#04;&#05;&#06;&#07;&#08;&#09;</dec00>
        <dec10>&#10;&#11;&#12;&#13;&#14;&#15;&#16;&#17;&#18;&#19;</dec10>
        <dec20>&#20;&#21;&#22;&#23;&#24;&#25;&#26;&#27;&#28;&#29;</dec20>
        <dec30>&#30;&#31;&#32;&#33;...</dec30>
    </decimal_character_entities>
</root>

Outputs:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> 
<root>
    <hex_character_entities>
        <hex00>&#x09;&#x0A;&#x0D;</hex00>
        <hex10></hex10>
        <hex20>&#x20;&#x21;...</hex20>
    </hex_character_entities>
    <decimal_character_entities>
        <dec0>&#09;</dec0>
        <dec1>&#10;&#13;</dec1>
        <dec2></dec2>
        <dec3>&#32;&#33;...</dec3>
    </decimal_character_entities>
</root>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Miller for the answer. In my case, the data was not supposed to have any line breaks or other special characters, so that's why I went with the simple solution. I have solved the case at hand using @Tim Wilkens's solution, but will definitely look at these suggestions in the future. –  Rasika Sep 1 at 5:08

It makes sense to write a subtitution that finds all entities in the HTML and uses an /e modifier so that the replacement string can be supplied by a block of Perl code.

This example creates the $html_chars regex pattern from your own question that will check whether any single character is within range, and then uses it to test the values of all character entities in the string.

Note that the hash # in the pattern must be escaped as a consequence of the /x modifier that allows whitespace and comments to make the regex more readable.

My test string uses entities for all ASCII character codes in both decimal and hex, and you can see that the substitution removes just the control characters except for HT, LF and CR.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $html_chars = qr/[\x09\x0A\x0D\x20-\x{D7FF}\x{E000}-\x{FFFD}\x{10000}-\x{10FFFF}]/;

my $html = do {
   local $/;
   <DATA>;
};

$html =~ s{ ( &\# ( x[0-9A-Z]+ | [0-9]+ ) ; ) } {
   my ($entity, $code) = ($1, $2);
   $code = hex $code if $code =~ s/x//i;
   chr($code) =~ $html_chars ? $entity : '';
}eixg;

print $html;

__DATA__

Decimal
&#0;&#1;&#2;&#3;&#4;&#5;&#6;&#7;&#8;&#9;&#10;&#11;&#12;&#13;&#14;&#15;
&#16;&#17;&#18;&#19;&#20;&#21;&#22;&#23;&#24;&#25;&#26;&#27;&#28;&#29;&#30;&#31;
&#32;&#33;&#34;&#35;&#36;&#37;&#38;&#39;&#40;&#41;&#42;&#43;&#44;&#45;&#46;&#47;
&#48;&#49;&#50;&#51;&#52;&#53;&#54;&#55;&#56;&#57;&#58;&#59;&#60;&#61;&#62;&#63;
&#64;&#65;&#66;&#67;&#68;&#69;&#70;&#71;&#72;&#73;&#74;&#75;&#76;&#77;&#78;&#79;
&#80;&#81;&#82;&#83;&#84;&#85;&#86;&#87;&#88;&#89;&#90;&#91;&#92;&#93;&#94;&#95;
&#96;&#97;&#98;&#99;&#100;&#101;&#102;&#103;&#104;&#105;&#106;&#107;&#108;&#109;&#110;&#111;
&#112;&#113;&#114;&#115;&#116;&#117;&#118;&#119;&#120;&#121;&#122;&#123;&#124;&#125;&#126;&#127;

Hex
&#x00;&#x01;&#x02;&#x03;&#x04;&#x05;&#x06;&#x07;&#x08;&#x09;&#x0A;&#x0B;&#x0C;&#x0D;&#x0E;&#x0F;
&#x10;&#x11;&#x12;&#x13;&#x14;&#x15;&#x16;&#x17;&#x18;&#x19;&#x1A;&#x1B;&#x1C;&#x1D;&#x1E;&#x1F;
&#x20;&#x21;&#x22;&#x23;&#x24;&#x25;&#x26;&#x27;&#x28;&#x29;&#x2A;&#x2B;&#x2C;&#x2D;&#x2E;&#x2F;
&#x30;&#x31;&#x32;&#x33;&#x34;&#x35;&#x36;&#x37;&#x38;&#x39;&#x3A;&#x3B;&#x3C;&#x3D;&#x3E;&#x3F;
&#x40;&#x41;&#x42;&#x43;&#x44;&#x45;&#x46;&#x47;&#x48;&#x49;&#x4A;&#x4B;&#x4C;&#x4D;&#x4E;&#x4F;
&#x50;&#x51;&#x52;&#x53;&#x54;&#x55;&#x56;&#x57;&#x58;&#x59;&#x5A;&#x5B;&#x5C;&#x5D;&#x5E;&#x5F;
&#x60;&#x61;&#x62;&#x63;&#x64;&#x65;&#x66;&#x67;&#x68;&#x69;&#x6A;&#x6B;&#x6C;&#x6D;&#x6E;&#x6F;
&#x70;&#x71;&#x72;&#x73;&#x74;&#x75;&#x76;&#x77;&#x78;&#x79;&#x7A;&#x7B;&#x7C;&#x7D;&#x7E;&#x7F;

output

Decimal
&#9;&#10;&#13;

&#32;&#33;&#34;&#35;&#36;&#37;&#38;&#39;&#40;&#41;&#42;&#43;&#44;&#45;&#46;&#47;
&#48;&#49;&#50;&#51;&#52;&#53;&#54;&#55;&#56;&#57;&#58;&#59;&#60;&#61;&#62;&#63;
&#64;&#65;&#66;&#67;&#68;&#69;&#70;&#71;&#72;&#73;&#74;&#75;&#76;&#77;&#78;&#79;
&#80;&#81;&#82;&#83;&#84;&#85;&#86;&#87;&#88;&#89;&#90;&#91;&#92;&#93;&#94;&#95;
&#96;&#97;&#98;&#99;&#100;&#101;&#102;&#103;&#104;&#105;&#106;&#107;&#108;&#109;&#110;&#111;
&#112;&#113;&#114;&#115;&#116;&#117;&#118;&#119;&#120;&#121;&#122;&#123;&#124;&#125;&#126;&#127;

Hex
&#x09;&#x0A;&#x0D;

&#x20;&#x21;&#x22;&#x23;&#x24;&#x25;&#x26;&#x27;&#x28;&#x29;&#x2A;&#x2B;&#x2C;&#x2D;&#x2E;&#x2F;
&#x30;&#x31;&#x32;&#x33;&#x34;&#x35;&#x36;&#x37;&#x38;&#x39;&#x3A;&#x3B;&#x3C;&#x3D;&#x3E;&#x3F;
&#x40;&#x41;&#x42;&#x43;&#x44;&#x45;&#x46;&#x47;&#x48;&#x49;&#x4A;&#x4B;&#x4C;&#x4D;&#x4E;&#x4F;
&#x50;&#x51;&#x52;&#x53;&#x54;&#x55;&#x56;&#x57;&#x58;&#x59;&#x5A;&#x5B;&#x5C;&#x5D;&#x5E;&#x5F;
&#x60;&#x61;&#x62;&#x63;&#x64;&#x65;&#x66;&#x67;&#x68;&#x69;&#x6A;&#x6B;&#x6C;&#x6D;&#x6E;&#x6F;
&#x70;&#x71;&#x72;&#x73;&#x74;&#x75;&#x76;&#x77;&#x78;&#x79;&#x7A;&#x7B;&#x7C;&#x7D;&#x7E;&#x7F;
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Yes, this is the alternative approach. I like your implementation. –  Miller Sep 1 at 2:16
    
Thanks Borodin, will definitely check these out next time I have to deal with broken XML data. –  Rasika Sep 1 at 5:09

Try this one.

$xml =~ s{&#[0-9a-z]{1-2};}{}igs;

share|improve this answer
    
-1: You should test your answers before posting them. –  Borodin Sep 2 at 12:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.