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I'm using Castle ActiveRecord for persistence, and I'm trying to write a base class for my persistence tests which will do the following:

  • Open a transaction for each test case and roll it back at the end of the test case, so that I get a clean DB for each test case without me having to rebuild the schema for each test case.
  • Provide the ability to flush my NHibernate session and get a new one in the middle of a test, so that I know that my persistence operations have really hit the DB rather than just the NHibernate session.

In order to prove that my base class (ARTestBase) is working, I've come up with the following sample tests.

[TestFixture]
public class ARTestBaseTest : ARTestBase
{
    [Test]
    public void object_created_in_this_test_should_not_get_committed_to_db()
    {
        ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.Save(new Entity {Name = "test"});

        Assert.That(ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.Count(), Is.EqualTo(1));
    }

    [Test]
    public void object_created_in_previous_test_should_not_have_been_committed_to_db()
    {
        ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.Save(new Entity {Name = "test"});

        Assert.That(ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.Count(), Is.EqualTo(1));
    }

    [Test]
    public void calling_flush_should_make_nhibernate_retrieve_fresh_objects()
    {
        var savedEntity = new Entity {Name = "test"};
        ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.Save(savedEntity);
        Flush();
        // Could use FindOne, but then this test would fail if the transactions aren't being rolled back
        foreach (var entity in ActiveRecordMediator<Entity>.FindAll())
        {
            Assert.That(entity, Is.Not.SameAs(savedEntity));
        }
    }
}

Here is my best effort at the base class. It correctly implements Flush(), so the third test case passes. However it does not rollback the transactions, so the second test fails.

public class ARTestBase
{
    private SessionScope sessionScope;
    private TransactionScope transactionScope;

    [TestFixtureSetUp]
    public void InitialiseAR()
    {
        ActiveRecordStarter.ResetInitializationFlag();
        ActiveRecordStarter.Initialize(typeof (Entity).Assembly, ActiveRecordSectionHandler.Instance);
        ActiveRecordStarter.CreateSchema();
    }

    [SetUp]
    public virtual void SetUp()
    {
        transactionScope = new TransactionScope(OnDispose.Rollback);
        sessionScope = new SessionScope();
    }

    [TearDown]
    public virtual void TearDown()
    {
        sessionScope.Dispose();
        transactionScope.Dispose();
    }

    protected void Flush()
    {
        sessionScope.Dispose();
        sessionScope = new SessionScope();
    }

    [TestFixtureTearDown]
    public virtual void TestFixtureTearDown()
    {
        SQLiteProvider.ExplicitlyDestroyConnection();
    }
}

Note that I'm using a custom SQLite provider with an in-memory database. My custom provider, taken from this blog post, keeps the connection open at all times to maintain the schema. Removing this and using a regular SQL Server database doesn't change the behaviour.

Is there a way to acheive the required behaviour?

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2 Answers

Not too sure about ActiveRecord, but in NHibernate a transaction belongs to a session, not the otherway round.

If you've used ADO.Net a lot, this will make more sense, as to create an IDbTransaction you need to use the connection. ActiveRecord's TransactionScope (and NHibnerate's ITransaction) essentially wrap an IDbTransaction, so you need to create the SessionScope before the TransactionScope.

What you might also find (depending on if you're using NHibernate 1.2 GA or NHibernate 2.*, and what FlushMode your SessionScope has) is that your call to FindAll() may cause the session to flush anyway, as NHibernate will realise that it can't retrieve the correct data without actioning the last call to Save.

This all said and done, have you tried using SessionScope.Flush() instead of creating a new SessionScope?

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Using SessionScope.Flush() makes my third test fail. As I understand it, Flush() executes the SQL to push my records into the DB, but does not evict objects from the session. That fits with what you say about FindAll() causing a flush.

What I really want is SessionScope.Flush() (to synchronise state of DB with session) plus SessionScope.EvictAll() (to ensure I get fresh objects in subsequent queries). My new SessionScope() was an attempt to simulate EvictAll().

Your comments about the session enclosing the transaction rather than the other way round did give me an idea. I'm not sure how kosher it is to create a new SessionScope inside a TransactionScope inside a flushed SessionScope, and expect it to participate in the transaction, but it seems to work:

public abstract class ARTestBase
{
    private SessionScope sessionScope;
    private TransactionScope transactionScope;
    private bool reverse;
    private IList<SessionScope> undisposedScopes;

    [TestFixtureSetUp]
    public void InitialiseAR()
    {
        ActiveRecordStarter.ResetInitializationFlag();
        ActiveRecordStarter.Initialize(typeof (Entity).Assembly, ActiveRecordSectionHandler.Instance);
        ActiveRecordStarter.CreateSchema();
        InitialiseIoC();
        undisposedScopes = new List<SessionScope>();
    }

    [SetUp]
    public virtual void SetUp()
    {
        sessionScope = new SessionScope();
        transactionScope = new TransactionScope(OnDispose.Rollback);
        transactionScope.VoteRollBack();
        base.CreateInstanceUnderTest();
        reverse = false;
    }

    [TearDown]
    public virtual void TearDown()
    {
        if (reverse)
        {
            sessionScope.Dispose();
            transactionScope.Dispose();
        }
        else
        {
            transactionScope.Dispose();
            sessionScope.Dispose();
        }
    }

    [TestFixtureTearDown]
    public virtual void TestFixtureTearDown()
    {
        foreach (var scope in undisposedScopes)
        {
            scope.Dispose();
        }
        SQLiteProvider.ExplicitlyDestroyConnection();
    }

    protected void Flush()
    {
        reverse = true;
        sessionScope.Flush();
        undisposedScopes.Add(sessionScope);
        sessionScope = new SessionScope();
    }
}

On further thought, this won't allow you to flush more than once in each test case. I think I can handle that by tracking the scopes more carefully. I might look into it later.

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