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I'd like to write a method that converts CamelCase into a human-readable name.

Here's the test case:

public void testSplitCamelCase() {
    assertEquals("lowercase", splitCamelCase("lowercase"));
    assertEquals("Class", splitCamelCase("Class"));
    assertEquals("My Class", splitCamelCase("MyClass"));
    assertEquals("HTML", splitCamelCase("HTML"));
    assertEquals("PDF Loader", splitCamelCase("PDFLoader"));
    assertEquals("A String", splitCamelCase("AString"));
    assertEquals("Simple XML Parser", splitCamelCase("SimpleXMLParser"));
    assertEquals("GL 11 Version", splitCamelCase("GL11Version"));
}
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1  
Is this a homework assignment? –  Jonathan Feinberg Apr 1 '10 at 10:47
8  
Have you taken a stab at it yourself? You'll learn more by us helping you with your attempts rather than providing you with the answer. –  Chris Knight Apr 1 '10 at 10:47
5  
First, you will need to specify the rules of the conversion. For instance, how does PDFLoader become PDF Loader? –  Jørn Schou-Rode Apr 1 '10 at 10:47
    
No, this is not a homework assignment :) I wanted to know if someone knew of a robust, tested solution for this problem, or could point me to a library that does this. –  Frederik Apr 1 '10 at 10:49
    
Hehe :D the question is vague as pointed out by Jørn Schou-Rode –  RubyDubee Apr 1 '10 at 10:57
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11 Answers

up vote 148 down vote accepted

This works with your testcases:

static String splitCamelCase(String s) {
   return s.replaceAll(
      String.format("%s|%s|%s",
         "(?<=[A-Z])(?=[A-Z][a-z])",
         "(?<=[^A-Z])(?=[A-Z])",
         "(?<=[A-Za-z])(?=[^A-Za-z])"
      ),
      " "
   );
}

Here's a test harness:

    String[] tests = {
        "lowercase",        // [lowercase]
        "Class",            // [Class]
        "MyClass",          // [My Class]
        "HTML",             // [HTML]
        "PDFLoader",        // [PDF Loader]
        "AString",          // [A String]
        "SimpleXMLParser",  // [Simple XML Parser]
        "GL11Version",      // [GL 11 Version]
        "99Bottles",        // [99 Bottles]
        "May5",             // [May 5]
        "BFG9000",          // [BFG 9000]
    };
    for (String test : tests) {
        System.out.println("[" + splitCamelCase(test) + "]");
    }

It uses zero-length matching regex with lookbehind and lookforward to find where to insert spaces. Basically there are 3 patterns, and I use String.format to put them together to make it more readable.

The three patterns are:

UC behind me, UC followed by LC in front of me

  XMLParser   AString    PDFLoader
    /\        /\           /\

non-UC behind me, UC in front of me

 MyClass   99Bottles
  /\        /\

Letter behind me, non-letter in front of me

 GL11    May5    BFG9000
  /\       /\      /\

References

Related questions

Using zero-length matching lookarounds to split:

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10  
I like your concern for readability –  Yaneeve Apr 1 '10 at 11:46
4  
C'est chic. Oh la la. –  Jonathan Feinberg Apr 1 '10 at 12:02
4  
Awesome. The trick of using look-behind regexes makes this a very elegant solution. Thank you! –  Frederik Apr 1 '10 at 12:42
    
hats off to u.. –  Sankar V Aug 18 '12 at 14:13
1  
The concept works in C# as well (with the same regular expressions, but a little different regular-expression framework, of course). Excellent work. Thanks! –  gmm Jan 7 '13 at 20:08
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If you don't like "complicated" regex's, and aren't at all bothered about efficiency, then I've used this example to achieve the same effect in three stages.

String name = 
    camelName.replaceAll("([A-Z][a-z]+)", " $1") // Words beginning with UC
             .replaceAll("([A-Z][A-Z]+)", " $1") // "Words" of only UC
             .replaceAll("([^A-Za-z ]+)", " $1") // "Words" of non-letters
             .trim();

It passes all the test cases above, including those with digits.

As I say, this isn't as good as using the one regular expression in some other examples here - but someone might well find it useful.

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You can do it with org.apache.commons.lang.SpringUtils

StringUtils.join(
     StringUtils.splitByCharacterTypeCamelCase("ExampleTest"),
     ' '
);
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You can use org.modeshape.common.text.Inflector.

Specifically:

String humanize(String lowerCaseAndUnderscoredWords,
    String... removableTokens) 

Capitalizes the first word and turns underscores into spaces and strips trailing "_id" and any supplied removable tokens.

Maven artifact is: org.modeshape:modeshape-common:2.3.0.Final

on JBoss repository: https://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/repositories/releases

Here's the JAR file: https://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/repositories/releases/org/modeshape/modeshape-common/2.3.0.Final/modeshape-common-2.3.0.Final.jar

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The following Regex can be used to identify the capitals inside words:

"((?<=[a-z0-9])[A-Z]|(?<=[a-zA-Z])[0-9]]|(?<=[A-Z])[A-Z](?=[a-z]))"

It matches every capital letter, that is ether after a non-capital letter or digit or followed by a lower case letter and every digit after a letter.

How to insert a space before them is beyond my Java skills =)

Edited to include the digit case and the PDF Loader case.

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what about digits? –  Yaneeve Apr 1 '10 at 10:48
    
@Yaneeve: I just saw the digits... this might make things more complicated. Probably another Regex to catch those would be the easy way. –  Jens Apr 1 '10 at 10:50
    
@Jens: Will it match the L in PDFLoader? –  Jørn Schou-Rode Apr 1 '10 at 10:52
3  
Now, I vastly admire your Regex skill, but I'd hate to have to maintain that. –  Chris Knight Apr 1 '10 at 11:07
1  
@Chris: Yep, thats true. Regex is more of a write-only language. =) Although this particular expression is not very hard to read, if you read | as "or". Well... maybe it is... I've seen worse =/ –  Jens Apr 1 '10 at 11:18
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I think you will have to iterate over the string and detect changes from lowercase to uppercase, uppercase to lowercase, alphabetic to numeric, numeric to alphabetic. On every change you detect insert a space with one exception though: on a change from upper- to lowercase you insert the space one character before.

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I took the Regex from polygenelubricants and turned it into an extension method on objects:

    /// <summary>
    /// Turns a given object into a sentence by:
    /// Converting the given object into a <see cref="string"/>.
    /// Adding spaces before each capital letter except for the first letter of the string representation of the given object.
    /// Makes the entire string lower case except for the first word and any acronyms.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="original">The object to turn into a proper sentence.</param>
    /// <returns>A string representation of the original object that reads like a real sentence.</returns>
    public static string ToProperSentence(this object original)
    {
        Regex addSpacesAtCapitalLettersRegEx = new Regex(@"(?<=[A-Z])(?=[A-Z][a-z]) | (?<=[^A-Z])(?=[A-Z]) | (?<=[A-Za-z])(?=[^A-Za-z])", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);
        string[] words = addSpacesAtCapitalLettersRegEx.Split(original.ToString());
        if (words.Length > 1)
        {
            List<string> wordsList = new List<string> { words[0] };
            wordsList.AddRange(words.Skip(1).Select(word => word.Equals(word.ToUpper()) ? word : word.ToLower()));
            words = wordsList.ToArray();
        }
        return string.Join(" ", words);
    }

This turns everything into a readable sentence. It does a ToString on the object passed. Then it uses the Regex given by polygenelubricants to split the string. Then it ToLowers each word except for the first word and any acronyms. Thought it might be useful for someone out there.

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2  
This code is in C#, not Java. –  Frederik Aug 18 '12 at 9:25
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I'm not a regex ninja, so I'd iterate over the string, keeping the indexes of the current position being checked & the previous position. If the current position is a capital letter, I'd insert a space after the previous position and increment each index.

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1  
Psssh! Where's the fun in that? –  vbullinger Aug 16 '12 at 15:32
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For the record, here is an almost (*) compatible Scala version:

  object Str { def unapplySeq(s: String): Option[Seq[Char]] = Some(s) }

  def splitCamelCase(str: String) =
    String.valueOf(
      (str + "A" * 2) sliding (3) flatMap {
        case Str(a, b, c) =>
          (a.isUpper, b.isUpper, c.isUpper) match {
            case (true, false, _) => " " + a
            case (false, true, true) => a + " "
            case _ => String.valueOf(a)
          }
      } toArray
    ).trim

Once compiled it can be used directly from Java if the corresponding scala-library.jar is in the classpath.

(*) it fails for the input "GL11Version" for which it returns "G L11 Version".

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RegEx should work, something like ([A-Z]{1}). This will capture all Capital Letters, after that you could replace them with \1 or how ever you can refer to RegEx Groups in Java.

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2  
{1} is redundant. –  Jonathan Feinberg Apr 1 '10 at 11:34
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http://code.google.com/p/inflection-js/

You could chain the String.underscore().humanize() methods to take a CamelCase string and convert it into a human readable string.

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1  
inflection-js is in Javascript. I'm looking for a Java solution. –  Frederik May 4 '10 at 10:06
    
Sorry about that. –  BeesonBison May 5 '10 at 16:12
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