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In Perl we can get the name of the current package and current line number Using the predefined variables like __PACKAGE__ and __LINE__.

Like this I want to get the name of the current subroutine:

use strict;
use warnings;

print __PACKAGE__;
sub test()
{
    print __LINE__;
}
&test();

In the above code I want to get the name of the subroutine inside the function test.

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1  
What output do you want if the current subroutine is anonymous? –  Charles Stewart Apr 1 '10 at 10:51
5  
sub test() {} defines a function with a prototype of "()". I guess you wanted sub test {} –  eugene y Apr 1 '10 at 11:40
    
Also, don't put an ampersand (&) before you subroutine calls because it probably doesn't do what you think it does. –  mpeters Apr 2 '10 at 5:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

caller is the right way to do at @eugene pointed out if you want to do this inside the subroutine.

If you want another piece of your program to be able to identify the package and name information for a coderef, use Sub::Identify.

Incidentally, looking at

sub test()
{
    print __LINE__;
}
&test();

there are a few important points to mention: First, don't use prototypes unless you are trying to mimic builtins. Second, don't use & when invoking a subroutine unless you specifically need the effects it provides.

Therefore, that snippet is better written as:

sub test
{
    print __LINE__;
}
test();
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Check the caller() builtin.

(caller(0))[3] will give you the full name (including the package name).

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2  
which gives you main::__ANON__ for an anonymous sub (or foo::__ANON__ if the anonymous sub is defined in package 'foo') –  mirod Apr 1 '10 at 11:31
5  
@mirod: local *__ANON__ = "foo"; -- this can be used to set some name for anonymous subroutines. –  eugene y Apr 1 '10 at 11:54
    
nice! (not that I would do that of course...) –  mirod Apr 1 '10 at 13:14
3  
helpdesk.wisc.edu/middleware/page.php?id=4309 has a good example showing caller in action. The example uses 2 functions, whoami() & whowasi() and shows the caller stack in action. –  slm Sep 6 '11 at 11:57

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